Tag Archives: weeds

Weed of the Week: Salvinia


Name: Salvinia

Scientific name: Salvinia molesta

How to identify the weed: A floating aquatic fern with green, spongy oval leaflets from 0.5cm – 3cm wide. Leaves are covered with water-repellent hairs which give buoyancy to the plant. Mature leaves have a mid-rib fold. Juvenile plants are a lot smaller, lay flat on the surface of the water and look very different to the mature plants. The mature plants have long filamentous roots which when pulled from the water look like wet hair.

Why is the weed a problem: Introduced from South America and is spread by fragmentation. This plant has the ability to choke wetlands, displace fauna, reduce water quality and harbour disease-bewaring vectors such as mosquitos. The plants can form thickets on top of the water which can restrict water flow and irrigation as well as increasing the risk of entaglement for people and livestock. This plant also increases water evaporation fourfold during summer.

How to manage the weed: Preventing the sale and distribution, as well as stopping the introduction of the weed into waterways from aquariums, are the best forms of control. An intergrated approach using mechanical (hand and machine), biological (salvinia weevil) and herbicide being the most effective way to eradicate this weed. For more information, please contact IndigiScapes on 3824 8611.

Any other interesting facts: Salvinia was known to be used as a tactical tool in war times. It was grown over dams and set-up to look like helicopter landing pads. When the enemy landed they would sink into the water body.

Salvinia molesta

Salvinia molesta

Salvinia molesta

Salvinia molesta

 

Weed of the Week: Ochna


Name: Ochna

Scientific name: Ochna serrulata

How to identify the weed: A small woody shrub growing to around 1.5m in height. It has glossy leaves with serrated margins. Flowers are yellow and have five petals. When the petals fall they leave sepals that turn bright red when the fruit appears which come through green and turn black when ripe.

Why is the weed a problem: Introduced from Africa, it has been readily dispersed by humans because of its visual appeal. It is also spread by birds who can quickly spread the seeds into a disturbed area where the plants form dense colonisations and out-compete native vegetation.

How to manage the weed: Mechanical removal of plants is the most successful method of control. Hand pulling small plants after rain and grubbing larger plants is recommended. The plant has an angled tap root so you must ensure you remove the entire root system, otherwise it will regrow. There are also a number of registered herbicides suitable for controlling this weed and optimum times of the year for treatment. For more information, please contact IndigiScapes on 3824 8611.

Any other interesting facts: Ochna is also commonly known as Mickey Mouse plant, due to its bright red, yellow and black colours.

Ochna serrulata

Ochna serrulata

Ochna serrulata

Ochna serrulata

 

 

 

Weed of the Week: Cats claw creeper


Name: Cats claw creeper

Scientific name: Macfadyena unguis-cati

How to identify the weed: A long-lived woody climber with fibrous roots and tubers.  Stems become woody with age and adhere to supports via short rootlets.  The leaves are oppositely arranged, consisting of a pair of oval leaflets and a claw-like leaf tendril that enables the plant to grow to heights of over 30m.  The bright yellow flowers are borne singly or in small clusters, consisting of a five-petalled tubular flower 4-10cm long.  The elongated and flattened seed capsules contain numerous papery seeds.

Why is the weed a problem: This very invasive plant grows as a groundcover and climber and quickly outcompetes native vegetation in riparian and rainforest communities.  It can completely smother existing vegetation, including tall canopy trees.  A combination of shading and sheer weight from the climber, leads to an early death for most native plants.  It is spread by dumping of garden waste and the movement of its papery seeds by wind, floods and soil relocation.

How to manage the weed: For minor infestations, manual removal of climber, seeds, roots and tubers is an effective of control.  For large infestations, chemical treatment would be required.  Cut climbers close to the ground and treat with a suitable herbicide.  Regrowth can be retreated using foliar spraying. For more information, please contact IndigiScapes on 3824 8611.

Any other interesting facts: This plant was introduced as an ornamental garden plant from tropical America.  It is now listed on the Global Invasive Species Database.

Cats claw

Cats claw

Cats claw

Cats claw

Cats claw

Cats claw

Weed of the Week: Asparagus fern


Common name: Asparagus fern

Scientific name: Asparagus aethiopicus

How to identify the weed: Commonly found in backyards this weeds is a low-growing, herbaceous perennial with arching, spiny stems up to 2m long with creeping underground stems and tubers.  Waxy pale green fern-like ‘leaves’ up to 2.5cm, singley or in clusters.  Its small white or pink flowers are borne in clusters.  Small round, glossy berries can be present all year round, turning from green to red as they ripen.

Why is the weed a problem: Introduced from southern Africa, this plant readily adapts to most conditions forming a dense thicket that smothers understorey vegetation and prevents natural regeneration.  It is quickly spread to new areas through dumping of garden waste and birds consuming the berries.

How to manage the weed: Remove the crown of the plant by cutting the bulk of the roots from the ground with a sharp knife and dispose of the entire plant. For more information, please contact IndigiScapes on 3824 8611.

Any other interesting facts: The underground tubers only store water and play no part in reproduction.

Asparagus fern

Stopping the spread of weeds


Redland City Council is managing the spread of weeds with the removal of a known problem weed, Cabomba caroliniana, from Tarradarrapin Creek, Birkdale.

Deputy Mayor Alan Beard said managing weeds is an important environmental issue and Council is tackling the challenge through its pest management plan.

“Cabomba caroliniana, an aquatic weed, is recognised as one of the worst weeds in Australia due to its invasiveness, potential spread and economic and environmental impacts,” Cr Beard said.

“Many people don’t think about aquatic weeds and their presence in waterways but they can smother native species, choke waterways and kill wildlife.

“Removing this weed helps to improve the health of Tarradarrapin Creek, increases aquatic flora and fauna biodiversity and in the long-term reduces waterway maintenance costs.

“Council encourages residents to learn more about weeds including how to identify and manage them in your own backyard.

“I encourage residents to sign up to Council’s Facebook page and follow the ‘Weed a Week’ post over summer. It will provide information on how to spot a Redland’s weed and tips on how to manage it.

“We need the help of residents to stop the spread of weeds as they don’t discriminate between property boundaries. Keeping an eye out for weeds and removing them is important in stopping them from increasing their territory in the Redlands.”

Weeds can have a number of negative impacts including: damage to our natural, agricultural, water and coastal systems; impact on agriculture and the poisoning of animals; changing our biodiversity by out-competing native plants and degrading wildlife habitat; impact on recreational activities and our gardens; and increase of fire hazard in bushland areas.

For further information about Weeds in the Redlands pick up an information booklet, Environmental weeds of the Redlands, from IndigiScapes or contact Council on 3824 8611 or visit www.indigiscapes.com.au.

A copy of Council’s pest management plan can be viewed on Council’s website: wwww.redland.qld.gov.au.

cabomba

Cabomba caroliniana – photo courtesy of Abyss Diving.

Redlands Wiping out Weeds


The Redlands community is helping to wipe out weeds with over 800 bags of weeds swapped for native plants at Trees for Weeds Days held in four locations across the city last month.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Trees for Weeds Days received enormous community support this year and helped residents learn more about weeds including how to identify and manage them.

“The event was held at IndigiScapes, North Stradbroke, Coochiemudlo and Macleay islands,” she said.

“Residents collected 40 bags of weeds at Coochiemudlo, another 40 on North Stradbroke Island and 248 bags on Macleay Island, while a massive 501 bags of weeds were handed in at IndigiScapes.

“Residents have made their backyards wildlife friendly and reduced their future garden maintenance as they replanted with their free native plants.

“Council was especially encouraging residents to look out for Climbing Nightshade, Coral Berry, Dutchman’s Pipe and Duranta sp. on the mainland and Fishbone Fern and Mother of Millions on the Islands.

“I would like to thank the community for removing so many weeds.”

Weeds’ guides are available from IndigiScapes to learn more about local weeds. To make gardening easier and save you a trip to the waste transfer station order your green waste bin from RedWaste on 1300 362 036. The green bins are a great way to manage your home green waste.

Woody Weed mascot at IndigiScapes

Woody Weed mascot at IndigiScapes

Trees for Weeds at Macleay Island

Trees for Weeds at Macleay Island

Weed weaving workshop at IndigiScapes

Weed weaving workshop at IndigiScapes

Redland residents Jenny & Steve Anthony picking up a free tree

Redland residents Jenny & Steve Anthony picking up a free tree

Swap weeds for free trees in October


Redland City Mayor Karen Williams is inviting residents to swap shopping bags of weeds for native plants at Trees for Weeds Days held in three locations across the city in October.

“Now in its 12th year, Trees for Weeds is a fantastic community initiative that has attracted more than 300 residents each year and has swapped more than 10,000 bags of weeds in the last decade,” Cr Williams said.

“Trees for Weeds Days are an opportunity for residents to replant their gardens with up to five free local native plants that are available per person. The events are being held at IndigiScapes, Coochiemudlo and Macleay Islands.

“Using native plants in your own backyard offers lower maintenance gardening, water saving and helps expand habitat for our wildlife.

“Weed experts will be on hand to help residents learn more about weeds including how to identify and manage them and to help find suitable native plants as replacements.

“Council is especially encouraging residents to look out for Climbing Nightshade, Coral Berry, Dutchman’s Pipe and Duranta sp. on the mainland and Fishbone Fern and Mother of Millions on Coochiemudlo and Macleay Islands.

Residents will also be able to participate in a ‘weed weaving’ workshop to be held at IndigiScapes Trees for Weeds Day on 6 October, between 10am and 4pm.

Cr Williams said the Redlands’ subtropical weather conditions provided an ideal environment for the rapid spread of weeds.

“We hope to equip residents with information to prevent new weeds from establishing and stop the spread of those already in existence,” Cr Williams said.

“Managing weeds is an important environmental issue and Trees for Weeds Days complement Council’s own weed management program.”

Weeds can have a number of negative impacts including:

  • damage to our natural, agricultural, water and coastal systems;
  • impact on agriculture and the poisoning of animals;
  • changing our biodiversity by out-competing native plants and degrading wildlife habitat;
  • impact on recreational activities and our gardens; and
  • promote fire in bushland areas.

Trees for Weeds Days will be held on the following dates and locations across the city:

Mainland Event
When: 10am to 4 pm, Saturday 6 October 2012
Where: Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba

Bay Island Events
When: 8.30am – 10.30am, Saturday 20 October 2012
Where: Coochiemudlo Island Jetty, Coochiemudlo Island; and
Macleay Island Progress Hall, 2 Russell Terrace, Macleay Island

For further information about Trees for Weeds contact 3824 8611 or visit www.indigiscapes.com.au.

Mother of Millions

Mother of Millions

Climbing Nightshade

Climbing Nightshade

Coral Berry

Coral Berry

Duranta sp.

Duranta sp.

Dutchman's Pipe

Dutchman’s Pipe

Fishbone Fern

Fishbone Fern