Tag Archives: community

Post-COVID recovery discussion during economic round table


Laying the foundations for a local post-COVID economy was a key point of discussion during a meeting of the Redlands Coast Economic Development Advisory Board (EDAB) this week.

EDAB Chair Sam Kennedy said this week’s round table discussions showed a large amount of work had already been done to lay the foundations for how the Redlands economy could rebound from the current pandemic.

“The meeting was a real eye-opener and shows the importance of collaboration in responding to the current economic challenges being faced through the COVID pandemic,” Ms Kennedy said.

“It is clear Council has already done a great deal of work on the city’s social and economic response and on behalf of the Board I congratulate them for moving so rapidly to respond.

“We heard about a number of success stories that have come out of Council’s $2 million stimulus package, including businesses that have used Council’s repurposed grants program to pivot and access professional services so they can continue serving the community.

“The Board also built on that work with some exciting discussions including internet connectivity across the city and how we can use the current situation to keep Redlanders in the Redlands through better connectivity, delivering an economic boost to local businesses. 

“We also discussed some exciting projects that are taking shape and have the potential to be a real game changer for the city.”

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said having some of the nation’s leading economic minds focussed on the Redlands would ensure we were well placed to not only recover from COVID-19 but to grow the local economy beyond the current pandemic.

“We know recovering from the current situation will be a marathon not a sprint, so having the foundations and collaboration is going to be critical,” Cr Williams said.

“The Board this week was able to provide decades of economic experience and suggest a number of key partners who can support Council in helping our initiatives and projects become a reality, ultimately delivering benefits for the broader community.

“This week’s EDAB meeting follows a round table I hosted with local shopping centres recently and a second meeting I convened to discuss how to ensure any projects built in our city deliver jobs for locals.

“It is critical this work gets done now so the plans are in place and ready for when restrictions are lifted so our local economy can benefit.”

Details of Council’s COVID-19 Support for businesses and the community are available at redland.qld.gov.au/info/20166/support

 

Protect your health from bushfire smoke


While there are no fires burning on Redlands Coast air quality is still being affected by smoke haze from fires around the rest of the state. The community is advised to remain alert to the levels of smoke, especially vulnerable people with asthma or pre-existing lung or heart conditions. What can you do:
• Look after vulnerable persons.
• Switch air conditioners to ‘recycle’ or ‘recirculate’ mode.
• Reduce outside activity.
• Seek medical advice if you experience any adverse reactions and stay up to date with local news reports.

For more information: https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/health-alerts/bushfire-smoke-health-alert

Council community grants now available


Applications for the first round of the 2019-20 Community Grants program open this month so now is the time to make your great community-focused idea happen.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the latest round of community grants would support a wide variety of projects and initiatives aimed at strengthening the Redlands Coast community.

“Every year, Council provides more than $300,000 in grants and sponsorship in the categories of Organisation Support, Project Support, Conservation and Capital Infrastructure,” Cr Williams said.

“Last year, Council grants contributed to a variety of projects, from supporting the Minjerribah Respite Community Garden on North Stradbroke Island to Conservation Volunteers Australia with weed control across the Coochiemudlo Island and to providing vital equipment for wildlife carers on Redlands Coast.

“Council also supported first aid training, coach accreditation and strategic planning for a number of sport and recreation clubs as well as for Victoria Point’s Meals on Wheels.

“Council’s Sponsorship Program helped to bring a range of fantastic community events to Redlands Coast last year, including the Cleveland, Camping and Boating Expo and the Quandamooka Festival.

Council is also sponsoring two community days for NAIDOC week, one on Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and one in Capalaba.

“The diversity of previous successful applicants illustrates the range of initiatives supported by our grants and sponsorship program.

“I urge anyone with a project or initiative that can deliver clear benefits to the broader community to apply,” Cr Williams said.

Applications for this round of community grants will be accepted from Monday 15 July until Monday 12 August 2019 in the following categories:
• Organisation Support Grant – for projects associated with becoming more sustainable and improving capacity to deliver services.
• Project Support Grant – for projects that deliver short-to-medium term positive outcomes for the community.
• Conservation Grants – for conservation projects that benefit the environment and wildlife.
• Capital Infrastructure Grants – to assist eligible organisations to build, renovate or refurbish facilities. This category aims to improve community facilities in the Redlands.

For eligibility criteria and to learn more about how to apply for grants or sponsorship, visit redland.qld.gov.au/Grants email grants@redland.qld.gov.au or call 3829 8999.

Redlands Coast experiences named among state’s best


An extraordinary 16 Redlands Coast enterprises have been listed on Tourism and Events Queensland’s 2019 Best of Queensland Experiences.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the result was exceptional and underscored the benefits of Council’s tourism strategy and the growing value of the city’s new brand: Redlands Coast – naturally wonderful.

“Being named among the Best of Queensland Experiences is quite a feather in the caps of those businesses which make it on to the list, and to have 16 of them in Redlands Coast is a great achievement,” Cr Williams said.

“These businesses have shown they can deliver exceptional customer experiences up there with the best in the state, which will help attract more visitors to Redlands Coast, boost our economy and ultimately create more local jobs.

“We now have a clear identity which local residents and businesses helped to create and it is paying dividends in a number of ways – more potential visitors now know what we stand for and the naturally wonderful things we have to offer, while businesses are embracing it with enthusiasm to promote themselves and our city.

“To now have such great representation on Tourism and Events Queensland’s Best of Queensland Experiences list, which recognises the high-quality experiences that best bring the Queensland story to life, is icing on the cake.

“With so many little local treasures now getting the exposure they deserve – from the great spots to visit to top-class eco, adventure and culinary experiences – we hope Redlands Coast’s representations on the list will continue to develop.”

Inclusion on the annual Best of Queensland Experiences is based on independent criteria that incorporates online customer reviews, responses to consumer expectations and reflects industry best practice.

The Redlands Coast businesses named are:
• Allure Resort, North Stradbroke Island
• Alexandra Hills Hotel Suites and Conference Centre
• Aria Cruises
• Bacchus Brewing Co
• Cleveland Motor Inn
• Colour My Pot
• Mt Cotton Retreat
• Redland Performing Arts Centre
• Redland Museum
• Redlands IndigiScapes Centre
• Redlands Kayak Tours
• Samarinda Jewel by the Sea, North Stradbroke Island
• Sanctuary by Sirromet
• The Lighthouse Restaurant
• Stradbroke Ferries
• Straddie Adventures

All operators in the program receive a personalised bench-marking report, allowing them to celebrate their successes and continually deliver exceptional experiences.

Citizenship ceremony celebrates cultural diversity


Redlands Coast was enriched by 77 new Australians during last night’s citizenship ceremony at the Redland Performing Arts Centre.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the city’s newest Australian citizens, originating from 14 different countries, have enhanced the rich heritage of Redlands Coast.

“Census figures show that almost half of our residents identify with another culture,” Cr Williams said.

“Our increasingly diverse community has become one of our greatest assets and it is the differences and contributions of our new Australian citizens that help make Redlands Coast the great place it is.

“Many people are attracted to Redlands Coast because of its breathtaking natural scenery and bayside location, but what makes the Coast an exceptional place to live is our community.

“We have bountiful opportunities here for our community to learn in exceptional educational facilities, work close to home and raise our children in a safe environment.

“These opportunities make Redlands Coast the best place to live, work and play, along with our city of unique villages, islands, and about 335kms of coastline providing naturally wonderful experiences for residents and visitors.”

Last night’s Master of Ceremonies was Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle, with Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges assisting in the presentation of certificates to the new citizens, whose origins included China, Denmark, England, Fiji, Germany, India, Iraq, Nepal, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and the United Kingdom.

Photos of last night’s citizenship ceremony:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/redlandcity/sets/72157707656876964

More land for local sports fields


The future of sport, recreation and conservation in the Redlands has received a boost with 159 hectares of land acquired at Mt Cotton.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said 277-293 Heinemann Road had recently been purchased by Council, with about a third of the area to be used for sports and recreation in the future and the remainder to be preserved as a conservation area.

“Existing sports grounds and facilities are at capacity in the Redlands and this site will provide our residents with more sporting fields and community amenities to enjoy,” she said.

“With its recreational potential and environmental values, this is a unique parcel of land that will support future demand for sporting facilities in the Redlands while also protecting a significant area of natural habitat close to existing Council-owned conservation land.

“Much of this land is heavily vegetated and will be retained as an environmental reserve, while the section already cleared will be used for future sports fields and associated infrastructure, including carparking.”

Cr Williams said Council officers would undertake a detailed planning study over the next 12 months, in consultation with all stakeholders including local sporting groups, to determine the best use of the site and provide recommendations for a future program of works.

“Given the size of this site, a multipurpose approach is most likely, with any number of popular ball sports and specialised recreational activities set to benefit,” she said.

“This precinct will not only be valuable for sporting clubs, but also provide cultural and economic benefits as an event space, cementing our reputation as an events destination.

“We expect to be able to also use the site to host local festivals, national sports events and cultural showcases in the future, like those often held at venues like the Cleveland Showgrounds.”

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said the site and Mt Cotton locality was ideally suited as a sports and recreation precinct particularly for residents in the southern part of the city.

“There is scope to connect this area with existing multiuse tracks and trails in nearby conservation areas like the Bayview Conservation Park, which would be welcomed by horse riders, mountain bikers, trail runners and bushwalkers,” Cr Talty said.

“The site would also link surrounding residential communities and expand the list of family-friendly natural attractions at the southern end of our city.”

Redland City Council looks to traffic congestion-busting alternatives


The absence of funding in the State Budget for Redlands roads highlights the need for alternative and innovative options to be considered to clear traffic congestion hotspots, says Mayor Karen Williams.

Cr Williams said a market-led proposal (MLP) remained the best option to fast-track much-needed roadworks to address worsening traffic congestion in a number of areas of the Redlands.

“Residents made it very clear to us before and during the election campaign that congestion was a major issue, and we know the worst choke point is Cleveland-Redland Bay Road,” she said.

“While this is a State-controlled road, we do not expect it to be on the State Government’s roads agenda any time soon so need to find other ways to upgrade the road, which is one of the major links within our city.

“If we are to get this work started and finished, the best option looks to be a partnership between Council, the Government and the private sector.

“Council is in a strong financial position and we are well placed to be able to contribute funds which could bring forward by several years a project that is urgently needed in the Redlands. Any contribution from us would be an investment in our future and be repayable by the State.

“The reality is we just cannot afford to do nothing. As this road does not seem to be a priority for the State, we have to convince them that it is for us and we are ready to work with them and the private sector to complete the work.”

Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle supported taking action to reduce congestion.

“As the councillor for Division 3, I understand more than most the traffic congestion issues growing out of the push from State Government to continue the forecasted growth in the Redlands,” he said.

“Any opportunity we have to decrease traffic congestion in the area will greatly benefit the residents I stood to represent and look forward to considering ideas to create better community outcomes for the city.”

Cr Williams said a report commissioned by Council as part of work by the Cross Boundary Working Group showed the worst traffic congestion within the Redlands was mainly on State-controlled roads. It identified Cleveland-Redland Bay Road as a priority for consideration as a MLP.

“The one exception was Rickertt Road in the city’s north, which has been a worsening choke point for many months,” she said.

“Redland City Council upgraded the road within Redland City and the main choke points now are within the Brisbane City Council area.

“I am pleased that the Cross Boundary Transport Working Group – consisting of local government, state and federal politicians and council and State Government technical officers – has delivered results, with BCC committing $15 million to the upgrade of Greencamp Road and the Federal Government committing another $5 million for work on Rickertt Road to clear congestion.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said: “I would hope that any proposed allocations of funding would be integrated into a holistic solution that is designed and managed by traffic engineer experts across all departments and levels of government.

“This will ensure long term improvements are made in the most appropriate areas to increase traffic safety and flow, benefiting motorists and cyclists for years to come. While I welcome pledges to assist the issue, I do not support political promises that are not integrated or strategised by expert road network planners.”

New fire trails for the Redlands


Community safety in the Redlands has received a boost with the State Government committing more than $330,000 towards fire trails at Mt Cotton and North Stradbroke Island.

Redland City Disaster Planning Manager Mike Lollback said the community resilience funding came after two years of lobbying by Council, in the wake of the devastating bushfires on North Stradbroke Island in 2014.

“Seventy percent of bushland on North Stradbroke Island was burnt out in January 2014 during the largest bushfire in Queensland’s recorded history,” he said.

“It was an incredibly harrowing time for locals and emergency services alike, who worked around the clock for 16 days straight to preserve lives and property against the ferocious forces of nature and fortunately no lives were lost.

“Preparation is crucial for bushfire management and fire trails help to stop fires spreading.

“Both Mount Cotton and North Stradbroke Island have very high bushfire risks and these new fire trails will provide our emergency services with greater access to inaccessible areas.”

Mr Lollback said Council had worked tirelessly with a number of government agencies over the past two years to lessen the threat from bushfire to local communities while maintaining the natural beauty of these regions.

“On North Stradbroke Island, our emergency services require better planning and coordination for access to the area around Dunwich and Myora Springs,” he said.

“The Minjerribah Fire Mitigation Project takes a balanced approach to bushfire management, increasing the network of fire trails on the island and improving public safety in consultation with the local community to minimise the impact to the island’s unique environment.

“Council will contribute a further $150,000 to the project over the next 12 months to maximise the safety of residents on the island, which will be delivered in partnership with the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation (QYAC) and the local Indigenous community.”

QYAC CEO Cameron Costello welcomed the announcement, noting it as a big win for Minjerribah.

“The new fire trails around native title lands in the Dunwich area will extend the network of fire trails on the island, building capacity of Quandamooka People in fire management and providing firefighters a better chance of stopping fires jumping East Coast Road and threatening lives and property in the area,” he said.

“This project will draw on traditional owner knowledge and environmental sensitivities to help better protect people, flora, fauna and important cultural sites from the effects of future bushfires.”

Visit www.redlandsdisasterplan.com.au to learn more about disaster management in the Redlands.

Redlands investigates water-play parks


Water play may become a feature of Redlands parks in the future following a decision by Redland City Council today to investigate options for installing water-based play equipment in the city.

Division six Councillor Julie Talty today called for a briefing paper about installing water-play equipment in playgrounds, citing the infrastructure was popular with local families, who currently visited water-play parks in surrounding cities.

“Imagine if we had water-play equipment in our city, interactive water features that would rival the beautiful whales at the Wynnum Water Park or the fantastic water fountains at Darlington Parklands, Yarrabilba,” she said.

“Throughout the school holidays, parents have travelled to these popular parks for their children to enjoy free water-based playgrounds and they’re questioning why we don’t have such community facilities locally. I agree with them – why not in the Redlands?

“Today’s decision is the first step and will investigate the type of water-play equipment available in neighbouring cities, how it works and the approximate cost to install and maintain it.”

A briefing paper about water-based play facilities in neighbouring cities will be returned to Council for consideration at a future workshop.

Cr Talty said Council would use the information to make an informed decision about the feasibility of pursuing the idea further.

“Modern playgrounds range from simple, prefabricated ‘plug and play’ designs to elaborate, custom-themed, iconic structures and it’s important we know the options before pursuing this idea further,” she said.

“From the River Heart Parklands in Ipswich to Brisbane’s Rocks Riverside Park and the Redcliffe Lagoon, the number of new and refurbished water-based playgrounds in neighbouring cities has grown in recent years.

“The fact that Redlands families are prepared to travel to visit these parks is testament to the popularity of this type of infrastructure.

“Enhancing our local parks with water-play equipment would ensure the Redlands is known as a destination of choice for families from near and far seeking a fun, affordable day out.”

Ground-breaking chlamydia vaccine trials begin for Redland koalas


Redlands koalas have been thrown a lifeline with a potentially life-saving chlamydia vaccine trial beginning last week.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council had provided $30,000 to the joint University of the Sunshine Coast and Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital trial aimed at finding a vaccine to fight devastating chlamydia disease.

“These trials are an exciting milestone and a ground-breaking step towards hopefully helping Redlands koalas fight this disease,” she said.

“Chlamydia is a cruel disease and Council’s support of this trial shows our commitment to helping our local koala population.

“Chlamydial infections have a huge impact on koala populations, causing conjunctivitis-related blindness and severe bladder and reproductive symptoms leading to infertility and a reduced number of females in the wild able to breed.

“While vaccines have been used on healthy animals in earlier trials, this trial will be the first full evaluation of a newly developed vaccine administered to koalas already clinically diagnosed with chlamydia in an effort to halt and reverse the disease progress. It follows a smaller trial conducted in Lismore last year.”

The initial trial will be conducted over several months and include koalas suffering from chlamydia, with one group receiving the vaccine and a control group receiving the traditional treatment of antibiotics.

The koalas will then be closely monitored during their stay at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital and upon release back into local bushland.

Cr Williams said she was honoured to attend the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital earlier this week to see the chlamydia vaccine in action.

“I was lucky enough to be on hand to see Flann the koala receive his final health check after being the first koala to receive the vaccine,” she said.

“I was very impressed with what I saw and am excited by the obvious potential of this trial and I will be speaking with my Council colleagues about other ways we can support this trial.”

Cr Williams said she had met with Professor of Microbiology at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Peter Timms, last year to see how Council could be involved in the trial.

“The Redlands is known for its koalas and I am keen to see the outcomes of this trial and continue working with the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital and the University of the Sunshine Coast to find solutions that can assist our national koala population,” Cr Williams said.

Professor Timms will lead the research team for this study and said it was wonderful to see the first full vaccine trial begin.

“The koala chlamydia vaccine trial being conducted at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital in conjunction with the University of the Sunshine Coast is a very important and exciting step in the development of a chlamydial vaccine for koalas,” he said.

koala1

Dr Rosie Booth, Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital Director, said Chlamydia was a significant problem for Australian koalas.

“About 38% of koala admissions at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital from July 2014 to July 2015 were due to chlamydiosis, so this vaccine is an important first step towards reducing the number of diseased koalas we’re seeing and creating healthier koala populations in the wild,” Dr Booth said.

Professor Timms’ research team will also use Redland City Council’s $30,000 funding to support other projects to look at whether chlamydial infections can be diagnosed through fresh koala scats and begin training a second koala detection dog to support the work of local koala detection dog Maya.

Cr Williams said efforts to save koalas needed to be multi-faceted – from bushland rehabilitation projects to community education and backing the efforts of scientists.

“The threats facing koalas are complex and varied, requiring the joint efforts of all levels of government, scientific experts and our community members,” she said.

“Council is proud to be associated with this scientific trial, which complements other measures we are taking to protect Redlands koalas, including the recent commitment to a three year comprehensive education campaign to better protect koalas from domestic dog attacks.”