Tag Archives: city plan

Updated Flood and Tidal Responds To Community Needs


Redland City Council has listened to the community by refining the storm tide hazard mapping in the latest Draft City Plan endorsed by councillors at a Special Meeting today (Tuesday 28 Feb).

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council responded to community feedback by engaging an independent expert to ensure the draft plan was built on the most accurate information.

“As a city of islands it is vital we have the latest information so we can ensure the city is resilient to coastal hazards such as erosion and storm tides,” she said.

“Council responded by engaging an independent consultant to review the existing storm tide information so the updated Draft City Plan includes revised mapping built on the latest information.

“The updated mapping shows fewer properties across the city with the potential to be impacted by flood or storm tides, particularly in our canal estates of Raby Bay, Sovereign Waters and Aquatic Paradise.

“This result gives our residents greater confidence that their properties are safe and resilient.”

Cr Williams said the revised mapping was not only good news for existing residents, it also provided the latest information to plan for the growth of our community.

“The result is a plan that identifies areas of potential storm tide inundation, meaning we can tailor planning requirements to ensure the future Redland City is resilient and safe,” she said.

“A perfect example of this is in the coastal township of Amity, where we know coastal erosion is impacting on development in existing urban areas.

“The amended Draft City Plan responds by restricting certain development in these areas to structures that require a coastal location or temporary buildings that are able to be readily relocated.

“This planning complements Council’s Coastal Hazard adaptation strategy, which together reflects our coastal location.”

Cr Williams said the amended storm tide mapping was one of the most significant changes made from the original draft plan, reflecting Council’s commitment to listening to the community.

“There were 181 submissions received during public consultation regarding flood, drainage constrained land and storm tide and Council has responded by ensuring future planning reflects the needs of the community,” she said.

“We cannot control Mother Nature, but we can plan for its impact, which is what this amended Draft City Plan does.

“The new storm tide information and mapping is in line with the State Planning Policy, including considering the projected impacts of Climate Change.

“As part of today’s decision Council will formally write to every submitter advising of the outcome of their submission,” Cr Williams said.

“If the Minister agrees to the draft City Plan, Council will meet again to formally agree to the new City Plan being adopted and a date for commencement.”

Environment and Heritage Winners Under Amended Draft Plan


Environment and heritage outcomes for Redland City have been strengthened in the amended Draft City Plan.

The updated plan was endorsed by Council at a special meeting today (Tuesday 28 February), and will now be sent to the State Minister for Planning for review.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said changes included strengthening regulations around clearing of native vegetation of significance in waterway corridors and 15 open space, environmental management or conservation properties that were previously slated for sale by council remaining as they are rather than being zoned residential.

“The draft City Plan has been amended to apply a zero clearing threshold to areas covered by both the environmental significance overlay and the waterway corridors and wetlands overlay,” Cr Williams said.

“This strengthens the draft plan’s intention to establish waterway corridors as the key ecological corridors through the city and provides additional protection to vegetation in some areas that may not be protected by the State Government’s Vegetation Management Act.

“This means any potential removal of vegetation in a waterway corridor would in future require an application to Council and would need to adhere to very strong environmental provisions including contributing to the restoration of waterway or land-based ecological corridors, maximising retention of native vegetation and significant habitat features and retaining and protecting areas of high biodiversity or environmental significance.”

Cr Williams said the new Draft City Plan also included updated mapping of environmental values and ensured smaller properties were protected by environmental significance overlays.

“The environmental significance overlay will be applied on lots larger than 1000m2 rather than lots larger than 2000m2 under the previous draft of the City Plan.

“This is designed to protect vegetation on lots in the urban area that may have some development potential for small-scale subdivision or small unit development.

“The change will mean an additional 2800 lots will come under the environmental significance overlay, meaning environmental values will be considered as part of any application for development. Of the more than 2800 new lots that have been identified, more than 1000 of them have more than 500m2 of mapped vegetation on them.”

Cr Williams said a property Council purchased at 61 Macmillian Road, Alexandra Hills, for the purpose of delivering a better environmental outcome would be changed to conservation to ensure that houses could not be built there.

“There will also be better protection for vegetation in the area between Double Jump and Bunker Roads, Victoria Point, with a new zero clearing threshold on the area,” Cr Williams said.

“This will remove the risk of patches of native vegetation being pre-emptively cleared, eroding the value of the broader area. Under the amended draft plan, any clearing of vegetation in this area will now require Council approval.”

Cr Williams said the Draft City Plan aligned with the Redlands Rural Futures Strategy that identified over-regulation that was hindering establishment of rural businesses in the city.

“Rural enterprises are one of eight key economic sectors identified for future job and business growth in the Redlands,” Cr Williams said.

“The Draft City Plan aims to unlock rural land for rural enterprises that will diversify the city’s economic base and create jobs in areas such as agriculture, horticulture, rural production, wholesale nurseries, aquaculture, animal industries, farm-door sales, outdoor recreation and bed and breakfasts with limited building footprint.

“To do this the Draft City Plan allows three threshold levels for clearing on rural zoned properties.

“On vacant land, up to 2500m2 can be cleared without approval, while properties with an existing house can only clear up to 500m2 without approval.

“Clearing between 500m2 and 2500m2 where there is an existing house will be self-assessable and require compensatory plantings on the site.

“This is intended to facilitate rural enterprises and to stimulate the rural economy without significantly disturbing the rural amenity or landscape character of the area.

“It is important to note that this will not allow properties in the rural area to be subdivided for housing.”

Cr Williams said the updated Draft City Plan also specifically referenced the importance of heritage values of Commonwealth land at Birkdale that adjoins Willard’s farm at Old Cleveland Road East, which has recently been listed on the local heritage register.

“Council is also undertaking a comprehensive review of heritage in the city.”

Cr Williams said Council had taken on board feedback from those who provided submissions to Draft City Plan.

“I thank all those who took the time to provide their comments.”

Amended Draft City Plan Improves Street Scapes and Design


Redland City’s amended draft city plan responds to residents’ requests for better designed homes and more aesthetic neighbourhoods.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the amended Draft City Plan endorsed by councillors at a Special Meeting today (Tuesday 28 Feb) included increased frontages and larger minimum lot sizes in some areas of the city.

“We know the Redlands is a beautiful city and we don’t want that beauty ruined by poorly designed residential properties so we have amended the Draft City Plan to ensure that doesn’t happen,” she said.

“This includes removing the opportunity for multiple dwellings in the low density zones and increased minimum lot sizes from 350m2 to 400m2 across the significant area of low density residential zoning in the city (currently Urban Residential).”

Cr Williams said Council had responded to community feedback by amending the Draft City Plan being.

“Residents told us they wanted larger lots and we have responded by strengthening the minimum lot size requirements as well as increasing the proposed 400m2 minimum lot size to 2000m2 minimum lot size for hundreds of low density residential properties in Alexandra Hills, Wellington Point and Birkdale.

“We have also changed the minimum lot size in the low-medium density zone from 250m2 to 400m2.

“Setting these restrictions, draws a line in the sand and sets an expectation for what our residents can expect to see in their community.”

Cr Williams said the amended Draft City Plan also strengthened design outcomes to retain the aesthetics of local neighbourhoods.

“The amended Draft City Plan acknowledges the need for housing diversity in the Redlands, while at the same time setting design outcomes that will mean future homes are visually pleasing,” she said.

“The draft plan includes site layout and design as separate performance outcomes, meaning Council can assess an application on building design, ensuring future neighbourhoods have well designed and laid out homes.

“These improved provisions coupled with increased environmental restrictions means our city will retain its open space and environmental characteristics.

“This is a direct response to community feedback, showing Council has listened throughout the City Plan process and has responded.”

Cr Williams said parking spaces would also increase for most new two- and three-bedroom plus units in the city.

“The amendment to the plan increases parking spaces to 1.6 spaces (up from 1.25 spaces) for a two-bedroom unit and to 2.1 spaces (also up from 1.25 spaces) for a three-bedroom plus unit within 800m of a train station and 400m of a bus stop with more than 10 services a day, which is the majority of unit blocks.”

Council adopts Draft City Plan Submission Review


Council has listened to community feedback in its updated response to over 5000 Draft Redland City Plan submissions at a Special Council meeting today (Tuesday 28 February).

The Draft plan had already removed the opportunity for multiple dwellings in the low density residential zones and increased minimum lot sizes from 350m2 to 400m2 across the significant area of low density residential zoning in the city (currently Urban Residential).

In response to submissions, Council further strengthened the minimum lot size requirements while other submission changes have included reversing the proposal for 400m2 minimum lot size to 2000m2 minimum lot size for hundreds of low density residential properties in Alexandra Hills, Wellington Point and Birkdale, and making changes to minimum lot size and frontage in the low-medium density zone from 250m2 to 400m2 and 7.5m to 10m.

Other significant amendments include regulating all vegetation clearing in waterway corridors; extending application of Matters of Environmental Significance overlays to all properties over 1000m2 rather than 2000m2; remapping storm tide areas across the entire city including Raby Bay, Sovereign  Waters and Aquatic Paradise and ensuring heritage values are specifically considered and protected in any future planning investigations of the Commonwealth land at Birkdale.

At the Special Council councilors formally decided to agree to the amendments proposed to the Draft Plan and submit the Draft Plan to the Planning Minister asking the Minister for approval to adopt the Plan.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said that under Queensland Government provisions for local government planning (Making and amending local planning instruments known as MALPI) the review document can only deal with the response to submissions, drafting errors or changed planning information.

“Council has responded to feedback from residents who made submissions during the public consultation period,” Cr Williams said.

“The change back from 400m2 low density residential (LDR) to LDR1 (2000m2) for almost 400 properties in Grenaid Court, Mossip Court,  Nelson Road and Marlborough Road, Wellington Point; Birdwood and Haig Roads, Birkdale; and Alexandra Court and Hanover Drive,  Alexandra Hills acknowledges the strong desire by community to retain larger property areas as a lifestyle choice.

“The amendments still allow diversity of housing in and around our centres, while ensuring minimum lot size and frontages, setbacks and good design outcomes.

“The unique character of the Southern Moreton Bay islands has been addressed through the Character Residential zoning provisions on the islands.

“The area between Double Jump Road and Bunker Road, Victoria Point, has also been included as an Emerging Community Zone, which now requires structure planning and affords greater protection to existing vegetation.

Council received more than 5000 properly made submissions by close of the extended 11-week consultation period between 14 September and 27 November 2015 (almost twice that required as the default period).

Consultation included division-specific letters to all Redland households and notification to all businesses and landowners; face to face activities that attracted more than 2000 attendees to 13 open house forums, 13 pop-up displays at shopping centres, markets and parks and stakeholder briefings; as well as website information that attracted more than 13,000 visits.

At the close of the public notification, 5347 properly made submissions were received by Council. Of these, 240 were individually drafted submissions, 10 submissions were submitted as petitions and the balance 5097 submissions were pro-forma submissions.

“Following the Council elections in March 2016, these submissions have been subject to intensive review with Councillors spending almost 100 hours in 26 internal workshops with council officers to consider the details of all submissions and draft responses,” Cr Williams said.

“This process has been achieved after exhaustive consideration of all the issues and in a spirit of compromise.  We all agree that each individual councillor will not achieve 100 per cent of what they want but we agreed we have compromised to find the middle ground, because we all know that is in the best interests of the city and the community.

“We acknowledge that we live within the constraints of numerous State Government law, policy and guidelines. However, when we set out on the journey to review City Plan we all agreed to say what we mean and to mean what we say within those State constraints. We are at that point.”

Cr Williams said the intensive submission review process had been completed, with a majority of Councillors supporting the decision to now submit the Draft Plan to the State Minister as part of the next step.

“Today’s decision includes writing to every submitter advising of the outcome of their submission,” Cr Williams said.

“If the Minister agrees to the draft City Plan, Council will meet again to formally agree to the new City Plan being adopted and a date for commencement.

“The City Plan is a living document open to future amendments. While the plan must be fully reviewed every 10 years, major amendments that reflect changing community and planning needs can be brought forward for community consultation and possible amendment.

“Future major amendments have already been identified and will be brought forward for community consultation as soon as we legislatively can so that the plan continues to be responsive to the needs of our community.”

The detailed submission review and draft responses report can be viewed on Council’s Website and on Your Say Redland City.

Video and audio transcripts of the Special meeting are available on Council’s website after the meeting as usual.

Draft City Plan Submission Review to go to Council on Tuesday


Council has listened to community feedback in its updated response to over 5000 Draft Redland City Plan submissions which will now go to a Special Council meeting this Tuesday 28 February.

The Draft plan had already removed the opportunity for multiple dwellings in the low density residential zones and increased minimum lot sizes from 350m2 to 400m2 across the significant area of low density residential zoning in the city (currently Urban Residential).

In response to submissions, Council further strengthened the minimum lot size requirements while other submission changes have included reversing the proposal for 400m2 minimum lot size to 2000m2 minimum lot size for hundreds of low density residential properties in Alexandra Hills, Wellington Point and Birkdale, and making changes to minimum lot size and frontage in the low-medium density zone from 250m2 to 400m2 and 7.5m to 10m.

Other significant amendments in the report to Council include regulating all vegetation clearing in waterway corridors; extending application of Matters of Environmental Significance overlays to all properties over 1000m2 rather than 2000m2; remapping storm tide areas across the entire city including Raby Bay and Aquatic Paradise and ensuring heritage values are specifically considered and protected in any future planning investigations of the Commonwealth land at Birkdale.

Tuesday’s Special Council meeting will formally decide whether to agree to the amendments proposed to the Draft Plan and whether to submit the Draft Plan to the Planning Minister asking the Minister for approval to adopt the Plan.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said that under Queensland Government provisions for local government planning (Making and amending local planning instruments known as MALPI) the review document can only deal with the response to submissions, drafting errors or changed planning information.

“Council has responded to feedback from residents who made submissions during the public consultation period,” Cr Williams said.

“The change back from 400m2 low density residential (LDR) to LDR1 (2000m2) for almost 400 properties in Grenaid Court, Mossip Court,  Nelson Road and Marlborough Road, Wellington Point; Birdwood and Haig Roads, Birkdale; and Alexandra Court and Hanover Drive,  Alexandra Hills acknowledges the strong desire by community to retain larger property areas as a lifestyle choice.

“The amendments still allow diversity of housing in and around our centres, while ensuring minimum lot size and frontages, setbacks and good design outcomes.

“The unique character of the Southern Moreton Bay islands has been addressed through the Character Residential zoning provisions on the islands.

“The area between Double Jump Road and Bunker Road, Victoria Point, has also been included as an Emerging Community Zone, which now requires structure planning and affords greater protection to existing vegetation.

Council received more than 5000 properly made submissions by close of the extended 11-week consultation period between 14 September and 27 November 2015 (almost twice that required as the default period).

Consultation included division-specific letters to all Redland households and notification to all businesses and landowners; face to face activities that attracted more than 2000 attendees to 13 open house forums, 13 pop-up displays at shopping centres, markets and parks and stakeholder briefings; as well as website information that attracted more than 13,000 visits.

At the close of the public notification, 5347 properly made submissions were received by Council. Of these, 240 were individually drafted submissions, 10 submissions were submitted as petitions and the balance 5097 submissions were pro-forma submissions.

“Following the Council elections in March 2016, these submissions have been subject to intensive review with Councillors spending almost 100 hours in 26 internal workshops with council officers to consider the details of all submissions and draft responses,” Cr Williams said.

“This process has been achieved after exhaustive consideration of all the issues and in a spirit of compromise.  We all agree that each individual councillor will not achieve 100 per cent of what they want but we agreed we have compromised to find the middle ground, because we all know that is in the best interests of the city and the community.

“We acknowledge that we live within the constraints of numerous State government law, policy and guidelines. However, when we set out on the journey to review City Plan we all agreed to say what we mean and to mean what we say within those State constraints. We are at that point.

Cr Williams said the intensive submission review process had been completed, with a majority of Councillors supporting the decision to now take the Draft Plan to a Council meeting to decide the next step.

“If the meeting on Tuesday agrees to the amendments and submission to the Minister, Council will formally write to every submitter advising of the outcome of their submission,” Cr Williams said.

“If the Minister agrees to the draft City Plan, Council will meet again to formally agree to the new City Plan being adopted and a date for commencement.

“The City Plan is a living document open to future amendments. While the plan must be fully reviewed every 10 years, major amendments that reflect changing community and planning needs can be brought forward for community consultation and possible amendment.

“Future major amendments have already been identified and will be brought forward for community consultation as soon as we legislatively can so that the plan continues to be responsive to the needs of our community.”

The detailed submission review and draft responses report can be viewed on Council’s Website and on the Your Say Redland City website.

The Special Council meeting [PDF, 47KB] is open to the public and will be held at 9:30am on Tuesday 28 February 2017 at Redland City Council Chambers, cnr Middle and Bloomfield Streets, Cleveland. Video and audio transcripts of the meeting will be available on Council’s website after the meeting as usual.

Community encouraged to have their say on proposed zone changes


Redland City Council is encouraging residents to have their say on the proposed rezoning of Council owned land as part of the Draft City Plan 2015.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said residents needed to be aware of what was in the draft plan so they could be part of the city’s future.

“The Draft City Plan aims to protect the city’s important conservation and environmental areas by encouraging growth as ‘in-fill’ development in existing suburbs and in designated greenfield areas,” she said.

“The draft currently includes a proposal to rezone some Council owned land that has been identified as surplus to our needs.

“Some of this land is currently zoned open space or conservation so Council is keen for residents to have a look and provide feedback through a formal submission.

“If any land is sold, the profits will go straight back into the city and if any conservation land is rezoned and sold, more land can be acquired for conservation land so there is no net-loss.

“It is important that the community understands that very few Council properties are proposed to be rezoned for housing; in most cases it is proposed the land be rezoned for conservation, recreation or community facilities reflecting their existing use and retaining the land for the surrounding community to use.”

Some important information:
– All rezonings are proposed for the community’s consideration only. Nothing has been decided.
– If residents do not agree with the proposed rezoning they are encouraged to make a formal submission as part of the City Plan process. This is the only way to have your thoughts considered in the final plan.
– There will be no net loss of conservation land. If any properties currently zoned conservation are rezoned to a residential zone, other more suitable land can then be acquired to add to Council’s conservation estate.

Cr Williams said Council owned 7,779 parcels of land that cost ratepayers $11 million to maintain, which was about five per cent of Council’s total annual operational budget.

“This land has been amassed over decades and, in some cases as the city has changed, what was originally planned for the land may no longer fit with the surrounding area.

“For example, the land may have been designated for open space but it is now covered in trees, so it is proposed to change the zoning to conservation.

“In other cases land may have been acquired for a use that never eventuated, so we are looking at what else it could be used for and want the community’s input.

“This process follows a number of studies completed over the years to identify land surplus to requirements, including Council’s Open Space Strategy.”

Cr Williams said while the proposed rezoning of land was usual practice when drafting a new City Plan, she wanted the community to know what was being proposed.

“Although the land proposed for rezoning is available through the City Plan consultation process we want it to be as transparent and accessible as possible, so we have also listed the properties on Council’s website and sent a complete list to media.

“Rezoning land is not uncommon for councils, but doing it as part of the new City Plan ensures the process is completely transparent and the community has a chance to have their say.”

Council’s planning and assessment spokesperson Cr Julie Talty said even if some of the properties were rezoned it did not necessarily mean their use would change.

“With Council land costing ratepayers million to maintain each year it is prudent and responsible for us to look at our land to ensure it is working for the community,” she said.

“A handful of the properties have been identified as possibly being commercially attractive if they are rezoned and this process provides the opportunity for the community to have their say on these properties before any decisions are made regarding their potential sale.

“It may be that some of the land is rezoned and sold, or it could be rezoned and kept as it is. It all depends on the individual parcel of land, which is why it’s so important for people to know what’s happening.

“It needs to be clear that even if land is rezoned it cannot be sold or transferred to Council’s investment arm Redland Investment Corporation (RiC) without approval from Councillors through a resolution in a Council meeting.”

To view the land proposed for rezoning or make a submission visit Council’s City Plan website and click on Draft Redland City Plan 2015 documents on the right.

Draft Redland City Plan 2015 – be part of your city’s future


The draft Redland City Plan 2015 was today released for public consultation, with Council encouraging the community to be part of the city’s future by having their say.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said today’s opening of the public consultation process was a milestone in developing a new blueprint for the city.

“Council has been working towards this moment for more than a year, so it is exciting the community can now view the draft plan and have their say,” she said.

“From today residents will find a raft of information on Council’s website, including the draft city plan and information specific to individual suburbs.

“Today also signifies the beginning of an extended public consultation period with the first community engagement session being held in Cleveland this Thursday.

“This plan will help shape the future of the city and because of its importance we will be keeping public consultation open for 11 weeks, nearly twice as long as we are required to, providing plenty of opportunity for the community to get involved.

“Up until 27 November a consultation roadshow will be rolled out across the city including engagement sessions and pop-up displays.  Council will also write to every resident to encourage them to get involved.”

Council’s City Planning and Assessment spokesperson Cr Julie Talty (Division 6) said Council’s draft city plan was designed to balance the needs of our growing city with the Redlands’ unique environmental character.

“The State Government has asked us to find room for an estimated additional 50,000 people and 26,000 new homes between now and 2041 and this draft plan focuses development in existing residential areas rather than new green field sites,” she said.

“It’s about getting the balance right so new residents can be accommodated while maintaining all the things we love about the city.

“The draft Redland City Plan 2015 is also easier for people to use, meaning residents will have a better understanding of how it will guide the city’s future moving forward.

“Public submissions can be made either by hard copy or online.  Council officers are on hand to show people how to make a submission and answer any questions.”

Consultation events will include:
· Open House events at locations across the City
· More than a dozen pop-ups information booths across the city
· Permanent displays at Council Customer Service Centres
· Meet the planner 20-minute sessions – on Tuesday each week, telephone Council 3829 8999 to book

Collateral
· Six-page Divisional Householder Brochure mailed to each city residential address – includes a summary of division specific changes
· Fact sheets mailed to absent landholders, organisations and businesses
· A dedicated website, including factsheets and divisional information
· Email updates to registered users
· Facebook, Twitter promotion and video content

To view the draft Redland City Plan 2015 and the full list of engagements visit www.redland.qld.gov.au/cityplan.

Proposed City Plan sent for Ministerial sign-off


Redland City Council has submitted an amended draft Redland City Plan to the Queensland Government that addresses matters raised through a state interest review.

The details of the new City Plan review remain confidential until Deputy Premier and Minister for Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning, the Hon Jackie Trad, agrees to its public release for consultation.

A key principle underlying the work done to date on the City Plan has been to reduce the complexity of the planning scheme and make it easier to understand and more user-friendly.

If approved by the Minister, the next step for the plan will be widely advertised public consultation including community forums, online information and activities, library displays, mail-outs to all residents, fact sheets, meet the planner sessions and meetings with key groups.

The public consultation on the City Plan and all residents are encouraged to have their say at that time.”

Providing a blueprint for the future development of the city over the next decade the plan will enable the city to manage and take advantage of economic and growth opportunities, while maintaining the distinctive character and lifestyle that makes us one of the most ecologically sustainable cities in Australia and a great place to live,” she said.