Category Archives: Waste and recycling

Keep hazardous waste out of wheelie bins


Earlier this month an emergency was averted by the swift actions of a truck driver undertaking kerbside waste collection on behalf of Redland City Council.

Redland City Mayor praised the JJ Richards employee who noticed his load had caught on fire and jettisoned it in the parking area next to Sel Outridge Park in Redland Bay.

A load had to be quickly jettisoned at Sel Outridge Park, Redland Bay, when it caught on fire during kerbside collection. Luckily the driver was unharmed and the mess was fully cleaned up once the fire was extinguished.

“These types of incidents are being increasingly reported by Council’s kerbside waste collection contractor, JJ Richards, with a ‘hot load’ last year burning right through the metal skin of a truck,” Cr Williams said.

“Hot loads are frequently the result of the wrong type of waste, most notably hazardous waste, being placed in household wheelie bins by residents.”

Cr Williams said there were good reasons for restrictions on what could be put in wheelie bins.

“Hazardous waste can catch on fire while being unwittingly transported in waste collection trucks, causing extensive damage to the vehicle and endangering the safety of the driver and potentially other road users,” she said.

“We’re appealing to residents to keep dangerous materials out of wheelie bins. That includes anything marked as toxic, hazardous, flammable or requiring caution.

“Household batteries and gas bottles are two of the worst culprits.

“In addition to the immediate dangers during transportation, hazardous waste can harm people and our environment when it ends up in our landfill and recycling centres.

“That’s why we’re urging everyone to take their hazardous waste to the appropriate drop-off points.”

Where to take hazardous waste

Council facilities

Gas bottles, car batteries, waste oil and asbestos can the taken to Council’s staffed Recycling and Waste Centre at Redland Bay, Birkdale, Coochiemudlo Island, Macleay Island, Russell Island and North Stradbroke Island.

Residents can safely dispose of an extensive range of hazardous waste at our Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre, including:

  • Acids and alkalis
  • Chemical containers
  • Coolants and brake fluids
  • Engine oil
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Gas bottles, including butane cans
  • Glue and solvents
  • Herbicides
  • Household chemicals
  • Lubricant grease
  • Mercury-containing lamps (unbroken only)
    • Examples are compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and fluorescent tubes
    • Broken lamps should be carefully sealed in a plastic bag and put in a waste wheelie bin
  • Pesticides
  • Petrol
  • Pool chemicals
  • Rust inhibitors
  • Smoke alarms/detectors
  • Thinners
  • Wood preservatives
  • Vehicle batteries

Visit Council’s website for more information on conditions and safe disposal of hazardous waste.

Other facilities

Council does not take all hazardous waste, some requiring other specialist disposal.

Flares and EPIRBS can be disposed of at three different locations. Check the Maritime Safety Website.

Household batteries can be taken to community drop off points.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Putting a lid on household recycling contamination


“Keep it loose and clean. Don’t bag your recycling.”

These are the simple takeaways Redland City Mayor Karen Williams is urging residents to remember as part of a Council campaign to crush a worrying rise in recycling contamination.

“Just five types of materials can be recycled kerbside – paper, cardboard, glass jars and bottles, aluminium and steel cans and firm plastic containers and bottles,” Cr Williams said.

“But we are seeing a lot of other items in yellow-top bins, items that contaminate the load and waste our good efforts.

“The average rate for recycling contamination on the Redlands Coast had been going up since 2018, from 8 per cent to 11 per cent last year, and tracking at a disturbing average of 12.4 per cent in 2021.

Cr Williams said while she applauded residents for their enthusiastic recycling, meeting recycling targets meant more than shifting items from our general waste wheelie bin to the household recycling or green waste bin.

“The right materials need to go in the right bins,” she said.

“When a yellow-top wheelie bin has too much non-recyclable material – or contamination – it decreases the quality of recyclable materials and makes it harder for the good quality products to be extracted in the sorting equipment.

“As well as being a waste of renewable resources, this has the potential to increase Council’s, and therefore ratepayers’, waste management costs as the contaminated recycling may have to be taken to landfill.

“Household recycling is a commercial activity that Council pays for and when the quality decreases the processing costs increase.

“We do not want to reach the point where excess contamination costs may need to be passed on to ratepayers.

“That’s why we’re appealing to residents to not only recycle, but recycle right.”

Cr Williams said getting recycling right was not always easy but was something the council and community needed to work on together.

“With hundreds of recycling labels out there, it can be confusing and even recycling gurus can get it wrong,” she said.

“But the good news is that Australia and New Zealand have rolled out a new labelling information system for food packaging, called the Australasian Recycling Label (ARL), which, hopefully, will end this confusion.

“Planet Ark has run a “Check it! Before You Chuck It national campaign to raise awareness about the new labels, which it says provides easy-to-understand recycling information when you need it most.”

Cr Williams urged residents to check the labels and learn more about what items are okay to put in the yellow bins.

“If you’re unsure about an item, check Council’s online A-Z of waste recycling .”

CONTAMINATING MISTAKES TO AVOID

The main offenders:

  • Bagged items – residents should not place recycling into a kitchen tidy bag or garbage bag or place general waste in the recycling bin
  • Soft plastics items such as bread bags, cereal box liners, pasta packets, chip packets, frozen veggie packets etc can only be recycled if taken to a specialised recycling collection point, such as the ones available in major supermarkets.
  • Soft plastics cannot be processed through Council’s recycling facility and therefore cannot be placed in kerbside recycling.
  • Bubble wrap
  • Food scraps – including excess food in containers. Containers do not need to be fully rinsed before being placed in your recycling bin.
  • Clothing / materials
  • Polystyrene
  • Plastic toys.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Council pilots smart solar compacting bins in popular reserve


Redland City Council has installed 10 smart solar compacting bins at Wellington Point Recreation Reserve as part of a three-year pilot project.

Mayor Karen Williams said the project aimed to reduce the number of litter bin collections, costs and environmental impacts.

“Wellington Point Recreation Reserve has been chosen for this pilot project as it has significantly more bins and litter collections than other Redlands Coast parks,” she said.

“The reserve has about five times the number of litter collections of comparable destination parks, which represents about 13 per cent of the total public litter bin collections across Redlands Coast.

“As part of the pilot project, all bins in the reserve have been removed and replaced with ten 240-litre smart solar compacting bins, which can compact up to eight times the standard bin volume.

“Council will be able to collect valuable data on bin usage and fullness, allowing us to reduce collections from more than 160 to 20 each week and leading to an approximate annual saving of about $28,000.

“Ongoing monitoring and analysis during the pilot will allow us to consider further savings and possible implementation in comparable civic and open spaces.

“Reduced collection requirements may particularly benefit key island locations such as Point Lookout on North Stradbroke (Minjerribah) and on Coochiemudlo Island.”

New smart solar compacting bins have been installed in Wellington Point Recreation Reserve.

Cr Williams said the bins would also include poster panels so Council could provide education around better waste and recycling habits.

“Redlands Coast residents care about our wildlife and our natural environment and we want to help them reduce waste and keep our parks and oceans free from rubbish.

“The majority of the waste going in Council bins is excess packaging from takeaway food and Council would like to work with businesses to reduce this.”

Division 1 Councillor Wendy Boglary said the solar compacting bins provided an exciting opportunity to reduce visual impacts and improve general amenity at the reserve.

“Due to their increased capacity and ability to issue fullness alerts, these bins should significantly reduce any issues of overflowing bins within the reserve,” Cr Boglary said.

“The project also means the litter bin footprint is reduced by 67 per cent, improving the visual amenity of the reserve.

“This means there will be more open space for residents and visitors to enjoy in this popular naturally wonderful park.”

Cr Williams said the pilot project followed the trial of a smart compacting bin in Bloomfield Street Park, Cleveland in 2019.

“The Cleveland trial saw a reduction in the number of weekly collections from five to two,” she said.

“Council decided not to roll this bin model out further, mainly due to its smaller capacity. This initial compacting bin is planned to be relocated to Cleveland Point Recreation Reserve.”

The $95,000 pilot project has been funded through Council’s Transformation Portfolio Fund, and is expected to be recouped in about three years.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Order a green waste bin during May and be in the running to win one of 100 worm farms


Redlands Coast mainland householders have an opportunity to win a worm farm if they sign up for a green waste bin during the month of May.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the promotion was part of Council’s campaign to secure 500 green waste bin orders over the month, starting on 2 May to coincide with International Compost Awareness Week.

“Council wants to boost the uptake of green waste bins because of the benefits they represent for the environment, and because they are convenient and good value for garden lovers,” Cr Williams said.

“Green waste bins currently do not have an establishment fee and homeowners who order before 31 May 2021 will have the chance to go in the draw for one of the 100 worm farms that Council is giving away, valued at $89.95 each.”

An example of the $89.95 worm farms on offer for residents to win.

Cr Williams said at present the ongoing cost associated with a green waste bin equated to just $1.23 a week, or $16 a quarter.

“For keen gardeners who produce a lot of green waste, the fortnightly collection service for bins is an easy and convenient option when compared to loading up the trailer to take it to a recycling and waste centre,” she said.

“People also have the satisfaction of knowing they’ve helped weed out unnecessary waste going to landfill because green bin contents are turned into new enriching organic products, such as soils, soil enhancers and mulch.

“And winners will also get to test out how well worm farms work for composting food scraps in their own homes, which helps to further reduce overall waste sent to landfill.

“The May promotion is part of the broader Council target for 21,000 green waste bins to be in use by the end of 2021 and 35,000 by 2025.”

Green waste bins can be ordered online from Council’s website or by calling 3829 8999.

Acceptable green bin items are:

  • Garden prunings
  • Grass clippings (do not bag if using a green waste bin)
  • Shrubs
  • Weeds and flowers
  • Leaves and loose bark
  • Sawdust
  • Small branches or soft wood (no larger than 75cm in length or 10cm in diameter)

Further details

  • The promotion is only available to mainland residents and new customers.
  • Customers ordering a second bin will be eligible.
  • Annual fees apply and are subject to change.
  • Council recommends tenants interested in green bins contact Council and register their interest so that when green waste bins are available to tenants we can contact them directly. Alternatively, tenants can contact their landlords to request they order a bin on their behalf.
  • Island residents can register their interest by contacting Council.
  • Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling plan is out for consultation and residents can hear more about the focus on reducing waste and increasing recycling from the kerbside bins and have their say until 28 May.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre to close temporarily


The Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre will temporarily close for maintenance for four days a week (Monday to Thursday) over two weeks from 17 May 2021.

Mayor Karen Williams said the closure was necessary for the safety of Council employees, contractors and the community.

“Works are planned to repair a storm water drain which has been damaged following recent heavy rain,” she said.

“The drain runs beside the down exit road and the site needs to be closed so repair works can be completed safely.

“In an endeavour to reduce the impact on residents as much as possible the works will take place between Monday and Thursday over two weeks, from 17 May to 27 May, with the centre to remain open during peak times.

“The centre will need to close on these days, with works to be undertaken during daylight hours, but will reopen from Friday 21 May to Sunday 23 May.”

Cr Williams encouraged residents to either hold on to waste and recyclables for a Friday to Sunday drop-off at Birkdale, or make use of the Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre.

Commercial operators are being asked to use alternative facilities during the closure period.

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges said she acknowledged the temporary closure may be an inconvenience for some people.

“We appreciate the community’s patience during this short-term closure while we improve services to our residents,” Cr Huges said.

“The centre is expected to reopen on Friday 28 May, subject to weather conditions and the progress of the maintenance work that will be required.”

Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre, located at 761-789 German Church Road, is open seven days a week from 7am-5.30pm.

This centre only accepts residential and commercial waste in vehicles with a gross combination vehicle mass (GCVM) of less than 4.5 tonnes. Recyclable material including cardboard and scrap metal is not subject to this limit.

The following commercial items are not accepted at Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre:

  • Commercially generated or transported fibro, cement sheeting and asbestos-containing material. Redland Bay only accepts residential quantities (up to 10sqm)
  • Commercial bricks and concrete
  • Commercial and industrial mixed waste in vehicles greater than 4.5 tonnes GCVM.

Commercial operators are encouraged to go to alternative locations where possible during the closure. Please check with operators regarding what waste is accepted.

Alternative locations include:

  • Chandler Resource Recovery Centre (Brisbane City Council), Tilley Road, Chandler – vehicles less than 4.5 tonnes GCVM
  • Resource Recoveries and Recycling, 706 Mount Cotton Road, Sheldon – does not accept commercial and industrial waste
  • Carbrook Waste and Recycling Facility (Logan City Council), 1801 Mount Cotton Road, Cornubia – vehicles less than 4.5 tonnes GCVM
  • Stapylton Resource Recovery, 144 Rossmanns Road, Stapylton.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Have your say on Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan


Redlands Coast residents can now have their say on Redland City Council’s four-year plan to boost recycling and reduce local waste going to landfill.

Council will open its draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 for four weeks of community consultation from 27 April.

Councillors have also endorsed in principle a longer term draft waste management plan developed by the SEQ Council of Mayors to guide a regional approach to waste management, which will be launched in May.

Mayor Karen Williams said all residents had a vested interest in how Council and its local government neighbours met waste reduction and recycling targets necessitated by significant changes in the waste sector in recent years.

“Better management of our waste and the greater uptake of recycling means more than just helping our environment and progressing to a zero-waste future, it is also critical to minimise extra costs to ratepayers,” Cr Williams said.

“In July 2019 the State Government introduced a waste levy in an attempt to reduce waste being sent to landfill.

“While this levy is currently subsidised by the State Government, we are concerned this subsidy may change in the future, making the investment into improved recycling a better use of community funds.

“Council’s draft plan, developed alongside the broader draft South-East Queensland Waste Management Plan, outlines how we can all work together to better use our existing kerbside waste, recycling and green waste services as efficiently as possible.

“Through it we will work to double the number of households with a green-waste bin for garden organics, as well as halve the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins.

“We also want to ensure everyone knows the importance of using the right bin and reduce the contamination in yellow-lid recycling bins that can undermine residents’ recycling efforts.

“Our aim is for 90 per cent of our community to be correctly recycling 90 per cent of their waste, 90 per cent of the time. This is what it will take to reach Queensland’s recycling target of 70 per cent by 2050, together with other industry action.”

Cr Williams said the draft plan relied on residents working with Council to reduce waste and increase recycling.

“The plan outlines a way we can collectively achieve waste reduction and recycling targets set by the Queensland Government,” she said.

“Community involvement is important to the success of the plan and achieving a collective impact on our waste management and a zero waste future for the Redlands Coast.

“Now that the consultation period has started, I encourage everyone to provide feedback on the priorities and initiatives identified in this draft plan.

“I know how passionate our community is about helping to look after our environment and keeping Redlands Coast naturally wonderful.

“So please take this opportunity to tell us what you think.”

Redland City Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 includes encouraging the improved use of the existing kerbside services such as:

  1. doubling the number of households with a green waste bin for garden organics
  2. halving the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins
  3. reducing contamination (non-recyclable materials) in the yellow-lid recycling
  4. ensuring everyone knows the importance of using the right bin.

Currently almost two-thirds of what goes in Redlands Coast red-lid waste bins could be kept out of landfill, including more than 10,000 tonnes a year of garden organics and 6,000 tonnes of other waste which could be recycled.

Visit Council’s Your Say website https://yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/  to read all about the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 and have your say by 28 May 2021. As an added incentive, those who complete the online survey will have the chance to enter a competition draw to win one of 10 x$50 IndigiScapes vouchers (terms and conditions apply).

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Council recycles road materials to create better roads


Redland City Council is using recycled road materials to deliver better road conditions for the community.

Mayor Karen Williams said the re-use of profilings (the waste by-product collected when roads are resealed) offered a number of benefits to both Council and road users.

“Recycling the profilings and using them in place of gravel not only results in cost savings for Council, but also offers a high quality structural surface and reduces dust,” she said.

“Profilings are a mix of surface bitumen and asphalt and some of the gravel below which are removed as part of the road resealing process, and are reused as part of Council’s support of the circular economy, where materials and products are recirculated for as long as possible.

“They have been used to build Council roads on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands (SMBI) for the past few years as part of the Green Seal program.

“We have also completed several big projects on the mainland, including Billiau Road in Mount Cotton and School of Arts Road in Redland Bay, which used thousands of cubic metres of profilings.”

The road profilings are screened and stored at Council’s quarry and then transported to sites as required.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said profilings had also been used for SMBI road maintenance for about the past two years.

“There is a need for continuous maintenance of unsealed gravel roads and roadside drains on the islands and Council’s road maintenance crews use road profilings – laying it, watering and rolling it to form a better surface,” Cr Edwards said.

“The profilings compact and hold better, reduce dust and have greater longevity than gravel alone.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Island residents support e-waste clean-up


Redland City Council has thanked its island residents for their support of an electronic waste drive which collected almost two tonnes of items over 16 days.

The Council initiative allowed residents to drop outdated technology waste into special bins at island-based Recycling and Waste Centres.

Mayor Karen Williams said it was not surprising that roughly half the e-waste was collected on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), our largest island community.

“Russell, Macleay and Coochiemudlo islands folk also put in a great effort, filling nearly five containers across the three islands.

“Residents were also able to collect a free tree when they dropped off an item for collection on 13 and 14 February,” Cr Williams said.

“During the ‘trees for e-waste’ weekend, Council gave away more than 60 free trees, which is an outstanding effort and good news for our island environments.”

Coochiemudlo Recycling and Waste Centre gatehouse operator John Mahony with some of the native plants for which residents swapped their e-waste.

Cr Williams said Australians generated about 73kg of e-waste per household each year with estimations that about 80% of that ended up in landfill.

“E-waste contains glass, copper, plastics and precious metals, which are able to be processed and eventually used in the manufacture of new products,” Cr Williams said.

“Stopping this waste from going into landfill supports Council’s commitment to a circular economy and the State Government’s goal of a zero-waste-to-landfill future.”

Cr Williams said this was Council’s second annual e-waste collection for our island residents.

“While this latest collection has now finished, Council encourages all island residents to hold onto their e-waste until the next local drive, or to take it to one of the mainland Recycling and Waste Centres wherever possible,” Cr Williams said.

“Mainland recycling and waste centres offer a full-time e-collection service where e-waste is recycled.”

In the 2019/2020 financial year, Council recycled 257 tonnes of e-waste.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Join the events to Clean Up Australia Day on Redlands Coast


Redland City Council is encouraging the community to become involved in this year’s Clean Up Australia Day.

Mayor Karen Williams said local residents could join an existing Clean Up group or create their own, with registrations for the March 7 event now open.

Businesses, community groups, schools and individuals can all take part.

“Getting involved will benefit the Redlands Coast community by creating a cleaner environment and protecting our waterways for everyone to enjoy,” Cr Williams said.

“Clean Up Australia Day is as much about preventing rubbish from entering the environment as it is about cleaning it up.”

Council will supply bins to event organisers, if requested by Friday 26 February, for waste and recyclable materials collected on the day.

Clean Up Australia chairman Pip Kiernan said now was the time for all Australians to step up and help.

“Last year saw disruption to our lives, not least of all to our local environments which have been impacted by increased uptake of single-use, disposable items,” Ms Kiernan said.

“COVID-19 has significantly impacted local environments with a surge in single-use disposable items such as takeaway coffee cups, food packaging, masks and sanitised wipes – all of which have polluted parks, bushland, streets, waterways and beaches.”

According to The Pact Group Community Attitudes to Waste and Recycling Report (July 2020), more than a third (34%) of Australian households reported producing more packaging waste during lockdown periods compared to previous years. More than half (55%) of those surveyed said they were now more concerned about product packaging waste than they were in 2019.

“By planning ahead and signing up to a Clean Up event, you are making a pledge to help conserve the environment for the long-term future, and taking an important action by stepping up for your community,” Ms Kiernan said.

Cr Williams said that in response to COVID-19, additional conditions would be put in place to ensure the health and safety of Clean Up volunteers. There will be limits to volunteer numbers at each event and Clean Up kits will include hand sanitiser and QR codes for registration.

Redlands Coast Clean Up events have already been registered at the following locations:

  • goochie mudlo (Coochiemudlo Island)
  • Victoria Point foreshore
  • Cascade Gardens and Ern Dowling Parklands, Victoria Point
  • South Street Conservation Area, Cleveland
  • Point Lookout, Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island)
  • Peel Street, Redland Bay
  • Merrill and Rob Ovendon Park Creek Catchment, Birkdale
  • Wynnum Redlands Canoe Club, Thorneside.

The Clean Up Australia Day campaign also includes a Business Clean Up Day on March 2 and School Clean Up Day on March 5. To sign up to an event, register your own or make a donation, visit cleanup.org.au.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

E-waste collection planned for island communities


Redland City Council is hoping to collect three tonnes of electronic waste (e-waste) for recycling during an annual collection drive for the island communities in February 2021.

Mayor Karen Williams said e-waste was one of the fastest growing types of waste worldwide and most could be recycled.

“Australians generate about 73kg of e-waste per household each year and it’s estimated that, nationally, more than 80 per cent is sent to landfill,” she said.

“Our mainland recycling and waste centres offer a full-time collection service where e-waste is recycled, and now this special collection will give our island residents the opportunity to thoughtfully dispose of unwanted e-waste items in their homes.”

Cr Williams said e-waste contained valuable materials such as glass, copper, plastics and precious metals.

“These materials are able to be processed and eventually used in the manufacture of new products, which supports not only Council’s commitment to a circular economy but the State Government’s goal of a zero waste to landfill future.”

Cr Williams said Council ran a similar collection on the islands in February last year and it proved to be a very popular initiative, with residents dropping off more than two tonnes of e-waste.

“We are hoping to increase that amount to three tonnes this year,” she said.

“As an incentive, we are also offering 100 free native plants in exchange for e-waste on the weekend of 13 and 14 February.”

Island residents can deliver their e-waste to the recycling and waste centres on Coochiemudlo, Macleay, Russell and North Stradbroke (Minjerribah) islands from Sunday 7 to Monday 22 February 2021 during normal opening hours.

Electronic waste includes:

  • Televisions and sound systems
  • Computer equipment and printers
  • Mobile phones
  • Power drills, fans and vacuums
  • Small kitchen and bathroom appliances

Large whitegoods, such as refrigerators and washing machines, can be delivered to recycling and waste centres as scrap metal at any time during normal opening hours.

Island businesses can deliver household equivalent amounts of e-waste at no charge and are urged to contact Council on 3829 8999 (8am-5pm, Monday to Friday) for advice if they have larger amounts to dispose of.

On the weekend of 13-14 February, the first 25 residents at each of the four island recycling and waste centres can swap their e-waste for a free native plant, courtesy of Redlands IndigiScapes Centre.

There is a limit of one tree per household.

Island recycling and waste centres locations:

  • Coochiemudlo Island, Elizabeth Street: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10am-12pm. Saturday and Sunday 10am-2pm
  • Macleay Island, Eastern Road: Monday-Friday 8am-2pm. Saturday and Sunday 8am-4pm
  • Russell Island, Davidson Road: Monday-Friday 8am-2pm. Saturday and Sunday 8am-4pm
  • North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), Dickson Way: Monday-Friday 8am-2pm. Saturday and Sunday 7.30am-3pm
Print Friendly, PDF & Email