Category Archives: Planning

Green light to support plan for age-friendly community


A five-year action plan to make the Redlands Coast a truly age-friendly community has been given the green light by Redland City Council.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council had today adopted the Redlands Coast Age-friendly Action Plan 2021-2026.

“Like many other communities, Redlands Coast has an ageing population,” Cr Williams said.

“This plan provides a way forward for Council, the community and government to work together to ensure that ageing on the Redlands Coast can be a positive experience where people of all ages can live active fulfilling lives, participating in all aspects of the community.

“It recognises the potential and the value of our older residents’ ongoing contribution to creating a vibrant community.”

Areas identified for action include:

* Outdoor spaces and buildings
* Transport
* Housing
* Social participation
* Respect and social inclusion
* Civic participation and employment
* Communication and information
* Community support and health services

Cr Williams said the Redlands Coast plan was based on the World Health Organisation’s age-friendly cities model which focused on reducing barriers in the physical and social environments so people could remain active and independent for as long as possible.

“This is a plan for our senior citizens, most importantly with valuable input from local seniors and seniors’ organisations,” she said.

“This has helped shape a path that is a true reflection of the needs of our community.

“For example, one of the focus areas will be options for ageing in place on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands.

“Other areas identified for action include improving community transport solutions, building resilient communities, developing research partnerships and intergenerational programs and establishing an age-friendly ambassadors program.”

The plan can be found on the Your Say website.

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Redland City advocates for new Redland Bay precinct


Redland City Council is advocating to the state and federal governments for their continued support of Redland Bay’s Weinam Creek precinct as a coastal village of regional and intergenerational importance.

At its general meeting today, councillors also endorsed the updated Weinam Creek Priority Development Area (PDA) masterplan, which is also being assessed independently by Economic Development Queensland (EDQ).

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council wanted to ensure the revitalised Weinam Creek transport hub was supported with health and other vital services for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands (SMBI) and Redland Bay communities and provided job opportunities for locals.

“The masterplan and Weinam Creek PDA Development Scheme supports the social and economic viability of the project as a coastal community and gateway to Moreton Bay and the SMBIs, stimulating island tourism and economies and enhancing public open space and services for existing and future generations,” Cr Williams said.

“We want to ensure the state and federal governments are part of this and will continue to push for commitments to utilise the precinct for services such as a satellite hospital.”

The Weinam Creek PDA project, which is managed by Redland Investment Corporation (RIC) in consultation with Council, covers about 20ha of land-based works across the existing site that will improve civic open spaces and include new retail, commercial, marine, health and public services.

“The project is now transitioning from the first stage of construction of the public carpark and residential precinct on the southern side of Weinam Creek to detailed master planning of the northern side of the Weinam Creek transport and ferry terminal,” Cr Williams said.

“As the masterplan has evolved from the conceptual to construction stages, minor changes have been made to refine the access and boundaries of the carpark to improve amenity for residents in the area. There are also slight refinements to the siting of the pedestrian bridge, boat ramp and residential zone.

“The result is a masterplan that will make a significant contribution to the community through the revitalisation of the waterfront precinct and the provision of a range of public and community infrastructure.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the proposed development would deliver a high-quality mixed-use development and improved public realm for shopping, working and socialising.

“This will create an appealing, safe and vibrant hub for the mainland and Southern Moreton Bay Island communities,” he said.

“Southern Moreton Bay Island residents and commuters using the Redland Bay Marina ferry terminal will benefit from improved access to services without the need for additional transport.

“This will also fill a gap which currently exists for Redland Bay and surrounding suburbs, while creating a significant number of new jobs, especially for the area’s younger residents.”

 

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Nature-based thinking around the future of Birkdale Community Precinct


With Birkdale Community Precinct rich in protected ecology and environmental values, Redland City Council is encouraging people to consider the area’s natural assets as they imagine and share their ideas for future uses of the land.

The precinct sits within an ecological corridor along the lower Tingalpa and Coolnwynpin Creek catchments and links with a broader network of conservation reserves and protected areas, with almost two-thirds of the precinct being protected by an environmental covenant.

Mayor Karen Williams said the 62-hectare site had potential for a huge variety of community uses, providing they were respectful of the land’s ecology and environment.

“The protections mean the precinct’s habitat, wildlife and heritage will be safe and the community keeps the beautiful greenbelt we now see wrapping around the meandering Tingalpa Creek. I want to make it really clear that these areas are preserved for future generations and will be enhanced and connected to make areas of outstanding ecological importance to our wildlife,” Cr Williams said.

“That doesn’t exclude the community from being able to access and enjoy these beautiful areas in the future, as some low-impact ‘tread-lightly’ ideas that are respectful of their environment are possible. The community will always be the custodians of this protected conservation area which covers almost 40 hectares of the precinct, so how can it be best enjoyed perhaps through education and discovery opportunities?

“It brings to mind such endeavours as interactive nature walks, both day and night-time, and small scale, eco-friendly stay options, such as camping, glamping, perhaps even tree-house accommodation that help facilitate citizen science projects.

“These are just a few of the possible uses and we invite the community to help build the future by sharing their ideas for the site with us. The precinct offers wonderful opportunities for us to transform this site into an environmentally and family-friendly conservation and recreational area that we can all be proud of.”

Cr Williams said Council had undertaken extensive environmental and cultural studies and had implemented management plans for the precinct to protect its unique values.

“There is also the opportunity to enhance habitat connections throughout the site and beyond which is really how we can elevate the importance and quality of the ecology on the land beyond just a single patch,” she said.

“Some of the precinct’s areas that fall under a Community Facilities zone have minimal identified environmental values, allowing potential community uses amid the naturally wonderful environment across the precinct.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said one thing COVID-19 had reminded us all of was the importance of people reconnecting – with themselves and family, within nature.

“In my view, the Birkdale Community Precinct site continues to remind us of the lessons that nature has been offering well before and since European arrival,” Cr Bishop said.

“Set within ancient land and cradled in the curves of a beautiful creek, this area offers an amazing opportunity for individuals and families to reframe our appreciation of economy, ecology and land use planning, as we reconnect with bountiful ecosystems within this place.”

Lat27 director Damian Thompson said reconnecting with nature had become even more critical in recent times as we travelled less and focussed more on our own back yards.

“This site presents an incredible opportunity to connect locals and visitors alike with the unique, largely unknown ecological attributes of this stretch of Tingalpa Creek,” he said.

Mr Thompson was one of five urban design and landscape architecture teams who created ideas boards for the precinct based around themes inherent to the site. His theme was Ecology and Environment.

A June 2020 study of the site’s ecology, commissioned by Redland City Council, discovered 219 flora species on the precinct, of which 146 were considered native species, and a total of 38 fauna species.

Future uses for the area will nurture and continue protecting these flora and fauna species.

The existing native vegetation identified in the report included native foods such as brush cherry, berry saltbush, ruby saltbush, native asparagus, kangaroo grass, warrigal greens (New Zealand spinach) and wombat berry.

For more information about Council’s community consultation on your input into possible future uses for Birkdale Community Precinct, visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au – see expert urban designers’ ideas, watch the videos, read the fact sheets, take a virtual tour of the precinct, and have your say.

Two open days when the community will have the rare opportunity to tour the site firsthand are planned for Friday April 16 and Saturday April 17, from 10am to 4pm. Full details on yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

Consultation closes on Tuesday 4 May 2021.

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Council tests new version of PD Online


Redland City Council’s PD Online portal is temporarily unavailable but Council hopes to have a new version online soon.

Council is testing a new version of Planning Xchange, of which PD Online is one component.

Dependent upon the outcome of testing, Council hopes to go live with this newer version of PD Online as soon as possible.

Council apologises for any inconvenience caused by PD Online going offline.

While PD Online is temporarily unavailable, residents wishing to obtain information on existing development applications can send an enquiry via email to pdonlineenquiries@redland.qld.gov.au, phone Council on 3829 8999 or visit one of Council’s Customer Contact Centres.

To obtain property information relating to zones and overlays in Red-e-Map, council has provided instructions on its PD Online webpage.

 

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Council moves to preserve local heritage places 


Redland City Council has asked the State Government for approval to add a number of local properties to its local heritage register.

Redland City Deputy Mayor Julie Talty said today’s decision followed public consultation on Council’s Heritage Major Amendment package that ran late last year.

“Today’s decision shows Council’s commitment to support our local heritage on Redlands Coast,” Cr Talty said.

“More than 300 places that contain European Heritage Values were examined by a heritage expert and in January 2019, Council made a resolution to commence the major amendment process to list priority sites to ensure that all local heritage themes identified in the City were represented.

“Today’s decision follows a 55-day public consultation period that resulted in 45 places proposed for inclusion in the Heritage Schedule.

“Almost 800 website visits and 37 submissions were received, including questions from property owners about the effect of adding their places on Schedule 7 (Heritage Schedule) of City Plan.

“Councillors have now adopted the public submission review report that was informed by submissions received during the consultation period as well as one-on-one meetings between interested property owners, Council officers and its heritage expert.

“Prior to commencement of the proposed amendment, Council will also consider an associated incentive packages to support affected property owners.”

Cr Talty said the amendment process had now reached a critical stage.

“Before any planning scheme amendment can be implemented, the Planning Minister must consider the proposal and provide approval to adopt it.

“Council will work with owners, the community and State Government in coming months in an effort to facilitate the preservation of our local heritage places.”

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New video showcases proposed Weinam Creek PDA master plan


Redland City Council has released a 3D flythrough video of the proposed Weinam Creek Priority Development Area (PDA) master plan, which is currently with the State Government for approval.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council was excited to showcase the proposed master plan and offer the community an opportunity to see the valuable infrastructure and community benefits expected from the completed project.

“The overall master plan will be delivered in stages, transforming the waterfront of Redland Bay,” she said.

“The project will provide much-needed community infrastructure for local families, improve the usability of the transport hub, attract visitors, create jobs, and drive economic development in the area.”

Council partnered with Council-owned subsidiary Redland Investment Corporation to deliver Stage 1 of the project, which was completed late last year.

This included a new footbridge and connecting pathways from the Moores Road car park to provide more direct access to the marina ferry terminal, accommodating foot traffic and bicycles as well as mobility scooters.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the project would include increased ground level and multi-deck car parking facilities, with a mix of short and long-term options as well as allocated disability parking.

“Other features of the proposed plan include improved drop-off and storage facilities for Southern Moreton Bay Island residents, more than 21,000 sqm of new public open space, the rejuvenation of 46,920 sqm of existing parkland, new pedestrian and cycleways and the construction of a new public boat ramp,” Cr Edwards said.

“There is also expected to be mixed use and medium-density residential development, retail and commercial spaces including cafes, restaurants and grocery outlets, as well as a health precinct for mainland and island residents.”

State Member for Redlands Kim Richards said the proposed master plan was the catalyst for transformation of the waterfront precinct and gateway to the beautiful islands.

“The project will provide important amenity to enhance and create a vibrant precinct for our growing southern Redlands mainland and island communities,” she said.

“It will drive economic development and create a spectacular waterfront destination for locals and visitors to enjoy and celebrate our unique coastal and island lifestyle.”

Redland Investment Corporation will host a series of 18 Meet the Planner sessions in the Redlands Coast Lifestyle Information Centre at the Marina Ferry Terminal between February 15 and 25.

To book a session, and to view the flythrough video of the master plan, visit Redland City Council’s Your Say page.

The master plan has been lodged with Economic Development Queensland for assessment and approval.

There will be further opportunities for public comment and submissions during a public notification period in a couple of months.

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Council committed to improving access provisions for Kinross community


Redland City Council will advocate to the State Government for a public transport corridor and bus service at the Kinross Road Structure Plan (KRSP) area.

Deputy Mayor Julie Talty said a Ministerial condition requiring the transport corridor was placed on the structure plan area in 2011.

“The provision of this corridor continues to remain the responsibility of the State Government through TransLink,” Cr Talty said.

“Unfortunately, TransLink has not indicated intention to provide the corridor or a bus service, but Council will advocate to the State Government to ascertain when this public transport link will be constructed, operational, and providing this much needed service to the Kinross community.”

This week’s Council report followed a Notice of Motion from Division 7 Councillor Rowanne McKenzie to investigate better access for residents.

“As part of a longer term strategy, Council will also review the potential for a further road connection for the Kinross community,” Cr McKenzie said.

“This will include in the first instance determining whether there is a need for a further road connection, with investigations to commence in 2021 as part of the next Local Government Infrastructure Plan review.

“The KRSP area is continuing to grow, and Council has conducted extensive investigations in the past into alternative access points.

“Council will continue to advocate to the State Government and investigate options to provide better access to serve this expanding community.”

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Have your say on the future of Redlands Coast


Redland City Council is inviting feedback on its new draft corporate plan: Our Future Redlands – A Corporate Plan to 2026 and Beyond.  

Mayor Karen Williams said all local governments in Queensland were required to produce a new corporate plan every five years, with the strategic document providing councils with clear direction for decision-making on matters such as budget and resource prioritisation.

“Our draft corporate plan outlines Redland City Council’s priorities for the next five years,” Cr Williams said.

“Unlike previous corporate plans, the draft Our Future Redlands also sets a long-term vision and goals to 2041.

“The new draft plan has been informed by what our community has told us is important.”

Cr Williams said analysis of community feedback from strategic planning and policy programs from 2010 to 2019 identified community views and values, while consultation with divisional Councillors ensured community needs were addressed.

“This analysis and consultation highlighted that many of the community’s views have remained constant over recent years, and Council remains committed to delivering a corporate plan that provides clear direction for decisions about the natural environment, strong communities, a thriving economy, city leadership, and Council as an effective and efficient organisation,” she said.

“Liveable neighbourhoods is also included as a strategic goal as Councillors and the community all prioritised city and transport planning as key focus areas.”

Cr Williams said that in addition to goals and the 20-year vision for Redlands Coast, the draft corporate plan also outlined key initiatives and catalyst projects.

“We have a draft corporate plan and now we want to hear from the community on whether we have it right, with the final plan to include revisions based on what we hear back from the community,” she said.

“I urge everyone to read the information available and have their say on the future of Redlands Coast before consultation closes on 11 November 2020.

“The easiest way to do this is to visit Council’s Your Say site for a copy of the plan and other information, including an online survey that can be completed.

“Additionally, Council is encouraging individuals, families and community groups to hold a DIY Conversation using the step-by-step guide that can also be downloaded from the Your Say site or collected from one of our Customer Service Centres.”

The new corporate plan will supersede the 10-year-old Redlands 2030 Community Plan.

For more information and to provide your feedback on the draft Our Future Redlands – A Corporate Plan to 2026 and Beyond, visit Council’s yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au and be in the draw to win one of five $100 gift cards.

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Have a say on future Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area land uses


Redland City Council is supporting the local jobs of tomorrow by prioritising economic development in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, with residents now invited to have their say.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council had focussed on jobs creation as part of a planning investigation for the area after Council had been directed by the State Government to consider the potential future growth area.

“This land has been the subject of almost 20 years of planning and community debate, disrupted by changing directions,” she said.

“The State Government previously included part of the area in the urban footprint, which would have seen the area used for residential development.

“But this decision was then reversed, with the State Government then nominating it as a Potential Future Growth Area and directing Council to undertake planning investigations to determine the preferred future use of the area.

“Council has been firm that this area should be used for jobs, not small lot housing and so we have developed a plan to reflect this commitment.

“The proposals include areas for mixed industry and business, intensive horticulture, education, training and recreation, a transport precinct, storage and larger home-based industry enterprise activities,” she said.

Cr Williams said Council had also drawn a line in the sand by clearly stating that land not used for economic uses should only be used for larger rural living blocks (i.e., with a minimum lot size of 1 hectare) and not small lot housing.

“Given this area has seen a number of uses suggested over the years, Council wanted to make it clear that we do not support small lot housing and will only support rural living, which fits with the character of the area while also addressing homebuyer demand for this sort of rural product.”

Cr Williams said Council had also resolved to consult the whole community on the proposed use of the area at the same time the proposed plan was sent to the Minister.

“The Minister wrote to Council asking us to engage with landowners in the plan area, but Council believes this land is strategically important for the entire city and given we are focussing on job creation in the area we felt everyone should have the opportunity to have a say,” Cr Williams said.

“As such we have today opened engagement and are inviting the community to provide feedback. The views of the community will be used to inform a potential future amendment to City Plan.

“There has been a lot of debate and history to these land use recommendations, and Council wants to hear the community’s feedback on the proposed balance of future economic and residential use of the land.”

For more information about the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area, and to have your say on the draft proposals for preferred future land uses, visit the project’s page on Council’s Your Say site.

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Council supports Covid-19 urban planning flexibility – not unintended legacies.


Redland City Council will not opt into state government Covid-19 planning regulation changes, for now, saying the Redland City Plan already aligns well with the majority of proposed changes.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council fully supports the need to facilitate flexible support for businesses, jobs and economic growth in response to impacts of Covid-19.

“Responses to Covid-19 need to help support business innovation, improved processes and help them to adapt and invest for long term futures.

“Good planning will facilitate this, and the Redland City Plan already aligns well the majority of changes proposed by the State.

“Where it doesn’t, it has been a deliberate decision to encourage appropriate planning uses and outcomes.

“Some of the Covid-19 planning concessions proposed by the State may well result in permanent unintended planning outcomes for the city,” Cr Karen Williams said.

“Examples include allowing specific non-industrial uses to establish in existing tenancies in industrial zones without the need for planning approval or expanding gross floor area of specific existing uses by up to 10 per cent or 100m2.

“Expanding floor areas without assessing the impacts may end up permanently reducing the number of parking spaces provided, thus affecting adjoining businesses, or impact site landscaping. 

“Proposed changes in uses allowed in an industrial zone that do not need to locate in these areas, will reduce suitable land set aside for future industry.

“Councils submission to the State will acknowledge minor and helpful changes while calling for more detail on some parts of the proposed changes.

“Council has received positive responses to date to its COVID-19 Business Support Grant and Innovation grants for Redlands Coast businesses. 

 “We will continue to work closely with business and new investors to the Redlands Coast to make sure there are no unnecessary impediments, including through city planning.

 

 

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