Category Archives: Environment

Council closes walking tracks during aerial spraying for mozzies


In response to heavy rain earlier in the week, Redland City Council will close some of its walking tracks at Victoria Point and Wellington Point on Friday morning, 22 January 2021, to conduct an aerial treatment of mosquito breeding sites.

Mayor Karen Williams said the larger additional treatment will target both freshwater and saltwater areas.

“A number of freshwater mosquito breeding sites have been inundated, particularly around Wellington Point, Victoria Point and Mount Cotton, causing mosquito larvae to breed in these areas,” she said.

“Council’s Pest Management Team decided to conduct the aerial treatment to target the mosquito larvae in these areas ahead of the Australia Day weekend.

“This is the first time Council has closed walking tracks to undertake mosquito spraying, but it was considered advisable due to the extent of the treatment.

“There is no danger to people, animals or the environment because of the treatment.

“It will be conducted with methoprene, which is a mosquito target-specific product that only kills mosquito larvae.”

The aerial spraying will encompass more than 100 hectares of additional freshwater breeding sites and is expected to occur between 8am and 12pm on Friday 22 January, weather permitting.

Walking tracks to close during this time are at:

  • Geoff Skinner Wetlands Reserve, Blight Street, Wellington Point
  • Point Halloran Conservation Reserve, boardwalk entry at School Road and Orana Street Victoria Point.

Signs have been placed in these areas, and the tracks will reopen as soon as the aerial treatment has been completed.

Regional Mosquito Management Group chairman Cr Paul Golle said while Council would continue to conduct ground and aerial treatments to manage mosquito numbers, it was also important for residents to take a proactive approach and check their backyards for possible breeding sites.

“Mosquitoes can be found breeding even in small amounts of water so residents are encouraged to empty pooling water from items around the yard such as pot plant bases, blocked roof gutters, bird baths, sagging tarps or covers and old tyres,” Cr Golle said.

“People can protect themselves by using insect repellents, maintaining fly screens on windows and doors, and using mosquito coils or plug-in insecticide burners.”

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Council installs baskets to keep litter from Raby Bay canals


Redland City Council will install litter baskets in 272 Raby Bay stormwater catch pits in a move to significantly reduce the amount of rubbish entering the canals.

Mayor Karen Williams said the installation, funded through a Federal Government Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Grant, should be completed by the end of March 2021.

“Local waterways are important to our community and Council is committed to improving waterway health for the benefit of both residents and aquatic life,” she said.

“The Raby Bay canals are cleaned about four to six times each year and the amount of rubbish collected tends to be event driven.

“If there is heavy rain, it typically flushes a lot of debris and rubbish into the canals where it gets stuck on the revetment walls and sits in front of houses.

“Shopping trolleys are regularly found, along with palm fronds, leaves and logs, and pollutants such as plastic, bottles and other rubbish that gets washed off the streets.

“The litter baskets are expected to capture much of this material so it doesn’t make its way into our naturally wonderful environment.”

Litter baskets are being installed in Raby Bay stormwater catch pits.

Federal Member for Bowman Andrew Laming said clean canals meant better water quality.

“Redlanders are mostly doing the right thing but as a last line of defense these litter baskets will make sure the waste ends up where it belongs, and not in our waterways,” he said.

Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell said the litter baskets would be retro fitted into all existing catch pits in Raby Bay and along the canals.

“Council regularly receives calls from residents concerned about rubbish in the estate so any measures to reduce that will be welcomed,” he said.

“There is also a lot of aquatic life in the canals including dolphins, dugongs, turtles, fish, stingrays, prawns, squid and even pockets of seagrass and coral – which will all benefit from a less-polluted environment.”

The litter baskets will be cleaned four times a year, with Council to collate data on the type of rubbish and pollutants collected.

There are litter baskets installed at 43 other locations throughout the city – at Redland Bay and Birkdale.

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Wastewater to hydrogen – Council seeks partners in local renewable hydrogen project


Redland City Council is calling for expressions of interest from partners interested in being involved in the development of a local renewable hydrogen economy on the Redlands Coast.

Council is seeking interest from parties to finance and develop a business case to fund and build a pilot plant to convert wastewater to renewable hydrogen at the Mount Cotton Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP).

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council today released the expression of interest (EOI) to attract funding to develop a business case which would address Council’s ‘Redlands Coast Wastewater to Energy Feasibility Study August 2020’.

“Our aim is to identify partners who can help build a pilot plant that integrates renewable hydrogen production into the Mount Cotton WWTP,” Cr Williams said.

“Hydrogen is in the spotlight worldwide as a viable source of renewable energy and Redlands Coast is looking to be a part of it.

“Multiple hydrogen technologies are being developed on the Redlands Coast, with QUT’s Institute for Future Environments basing its renewable hydrogen projects at the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries Redlands Research Centre.”

Council investigations to date are an extension of the research and development completed by QUT and show how these technologies can be integrated into local communities.

Cr Williams said there were many benefits of establishing a hydrogen economy on the Redlands Coast, including:

  • cheaper, greener energy for local residents and businesses
  • creating jobs and attracting investment to the region
  • ‘decarbonising’ the local economy
  • providing green power for remote and island communities
  • providing efficiencies for energy-heavy assets such as wastewater treatment plants.

The business case has the potential to be used as a blueprint for other wastewater treatment plant integration projects.

To download a copy of the EOI, please go to redland.qld.gov.au/info/20164/tenders_and_contracting/225/current_tenders

The EOI closes on 12 February 2021.

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Council devices keep rubbish from waterways


Redlands Coast residents are being asked to think about how they dispose of their rubbish after a newly-installed trash rack captured 8.5 tonnes of waste from local stormwater in just two weeks.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the newly-installed trash rack was part of Council’s network of 587 stormwater protection devices that helped prevent waste ending up in Moreton Bay.

“Last year Council removed about 280 cubic metres of litter, vegetation and other material from our network of stormwater protection devices – that’s enough to fill more than four average-size backyard swimming pools,” Cr Williams said.

“Anything from trees and logs through to toys, balls and takeaway cups are collected in these devices, and without them this material would have ended up in our local creeks and Moreton Bay.

“With a wet summer expected, there is likely to be increased stormwater runoff into our local catchments, so we are urging residents to think about where you throw your rubbish to ensure it doesn’t end up in our creeks.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said the Birkdale trash rack was installed on Agnes Street, alongside a public park, following concerns about localised flooding and pollutants entering Woodgate Canal.

“Two weeks after it was installed, Council officers inspected the trash rack as part of storm preparedness and noted it was already half full,” Cr Bishop said.

“Further heavy rain filled it further, resulting in it being emptied three months ahead of schedule.

“The trash rack will help reduce road flooding by preventing rubbish from blocking the drain.

“Council officers have advised that no animals have ever been caught in council rubbish traps or gross pollutant devices.”

Redland City Council uses a range of Stormwater Quality Improvement Devices, including bioretention basins, bio-swales, grass swales, vegetated swales, detention basins, sedimentation basins, constructed wetlands, inground and open gross pollutant traps (GPTs), trash racks, litter baskets and sediment traps.

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Council investigates suspected poisoning of trees at Ormiston


Redland City Council is investigating the suspected poisoning of up to 40 trees off Raby Esplanade at Ormiston.

Mayor Karen Williams said the vandalism occurred in an area of vegetation between the esplanade and the waterfront (north of Raby Esplanade Park), and appeared to have been staged over a long period of time.

“Council was contacted this week by a resident who was concerned about some dead trees along Raby Esplanade,” she said.

“When officers investigated they found holes had been drilled in the trees and it appears likely they have been poisoned.

“Our officers then looked at satellite mapping of the area which seems to indicate the vandalism may have started about October last year.

“The mapping shows dead trees located further in among the vegetation and progressively moving towards the road.

“Since June this year, two sites have started browning off further south near Julie Terrace.”

Cr Williams said trees in the northern section had been affected all the way back into the tidal area which is under the jurisdiction of the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, who have been notified.

Affected trees include Casuarinas, Tuckeroos, Acacias and many Eucalypts.

Division 1 Councillor Wendy Boglary said this type of vandalism was abhorrent and impacted the whole foreshore ecosystem.

“This vegetated foreshore is a vital link within our wildlife corridors providing a source of food, for roosting and refuge, and providing nesting for natural breeding of many forms of wildlife,” Cr Boglary said.

“If not managed properly, such vandalism can destroy corridors and cause limb or whole tree failure that can also be a safety issue for pedestrians, vehicles or cyclists.

“It also increases the impact of coastal erosion which may then need costly remediation to protect adjacent infrastructure and private houses.”

Cr Williams called on Redlands Coast residents to come forward if they had any information on the damage to trees in Raby Esplanade.

“We take the vandalism of trees very seriously and anyone who is caught damaging trees can face a $667 fine,” she said.

“Council also has the option to prosecute an offender, and a Magistrate can impose a penalty of up to $6672.”

Damage to trees is also considered wilful damage, which may lead to prosecution by Queensland Police.

Anyone with information on the suspected poisoning of trees off Raby Esplanade, or anywhere else across Redlands Coast, is encouraged to contact Council on 3829 8999 or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

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Redlands Coast maintains its healthy water quality rating


Redlands Coast waterways have maintained environmental conditions according to the 2020 Healthy Land and Water Report Card.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said steady catchment conditions of C+ and a Waterway Benefit Rating of 3.5 stars (out of 5) showed the good work being done across the city continued to yield results.

“We know our community loves our local waterways and Council is committed to improving waterway health,” she said.

“While we know there is still opportunity to improve conditions, it is positive to note pollution loads from the land remained very low.

“This has been aided by Council’s programs, such as our Environmental Partnership Program and the active Erosion and Sediment Control Compliance Program on development sites.

“Ongoing work in this space is increasing the resilience of our catchments to extreme weather events, with more than 1500 erosion and sediment control inspections undertaken over the last year.

“The Report Card also shows the health of the aquatic bug community remained stable, a useful stream health indicator.

“However improvement opportunities still exist for freshwater habitat, with a decline reported in the health of our fish community.

“We know our creeks experience low oxygen in discontinuous pools during dry weather, which can impact on these communities.

“Our need to contribute to a regional approach of waterway health was reinforced by the slight increases in nutrients in Southern Moreton Bay and the previous reports of mud from flows of the Logan and Albert Rivers.”

Cr Williams said the Report Card also showed the high value residents placed on their local waterways.

“The report shows 66 per cent of residents are satisfied with their local waterways, compared to only 62 per cent across all of South East Queensland,” she said.

“Residents also value local waterways for recreation, with 60 per cent of those surveyed using them at least monthly for activities such as walking or running, enjoying nature, cycling, picnics and swimming.

“This has highlighted the benefit of waterways to our community during the challenges of COVID-19.

“Here on the naturally wonderful Redlands Coast, our future is inextricably connected to Moreton Bay and the waters that feed it.

“This reinforces the importance of the ongoing works Council and the community are undertaking to protect and enhance our part of the bay and our creeks for a sustainable future.”

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Spooky Halloween fun on Redlands Coast


UPDATE 23 November: Movie in the Park event cancelled due to wet weather forecast

There’s always plenty to do on naturally wonderful Redlands Coast and Halloween is no exception.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said kids – big and small – were already starting to plan their costumes and activities for some wonderfully spooky fun on and around Saturday 31 October.

“Redlands Coast has a range of community events and activities from which to choose, whatever your interest,” she said.

“Our wonderful local shopping centres and traders have increasingly got into the spirit of Halloween over the years, handing out goodies to little ones whose parents prefer not to door knock.

“This year Victoria Point Shopping Centre has gone a step further, bringing to life augmented reality characters through the Redlands Coast Deals and Rewards App, a free mobile phone app aimed at promoting local businesses and rewarding their customers.

“This will be a fun new use for the Redlands Coast App, which was developed by Redland City Council and has already been download 1574 times for shopping in the city.

“If you are heading to Victoria Point Shopping Centre for Halloween, download the app from the Apple App Store or Google Play in order to spot the friendly monsters and participate in the virtual trick or treating with real treats up for grabs.”

Councillor Williams said there would also be activities around Redlands Coast for nature lovers and movie and history buffs.

“Nature lovers will be able to head to IndigiScapes – Council’s environmental education centre – to learn about our fascinating flying foxes and meet an adorable flying-fox pup from 10am-2pm, 31 October,” she said.

“The team from Bat Conservation and Rescue Queensland will talk about the ways of these crucial pollinators and kids can make a batty badge to take home.

“Redlands Museum and Theatre Redlands are hosting a spine-tingling Halloween Night Walk from 6pm, Friday 30 October.

“This event is not for the faint hearted, with a minimum age of 13 and prior bookings essential.

“Movie buffs can get their fix at Redland Performing Arts Centre (RPAC) on Saturday 31 October, where there’ll be an 11am and 2pm screening of Australian thriller Dead Calm. Prior bookings at www.rpac.com.au are essential.

“And in the lead up to Halloween, a free movies in the park event featuring Hotel Transylvania is planned for Saturday 24 October at William Stewart Park, Thornlands.

“There’s no excuse to stay home this Halloween so head out for some socially-distanced fun.”

Visit the What’s On community calendar on Council’s website for more information on what’s happening on Redlands Coast.

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Help build our regional circular economy and reduced landfill with the ASPIRE digital trading platform


Redland City Council has joined with neighbouring Gold Coast and Logan councils and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) to trial an online platform local businesses can use to source and dispose of unwanted items that would normally go to landfill.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the 12 month ASPIRE digital platform trial had the potential to bolster local business and deliver environmental and economic benefits for the region.

“Under the CCIQ ecoBiz ASPIRE Pilot, Redlands Coast businesses with fewer than 100 employees will have free access to ASPIRE’s easy-to-use tool for trading items that may otherwise end up in landfill,” Cr Williams said.

“As a former small business owner myself, I know that what is no longer useful to one organisation can become a cost-effective manufacturing input – or salvaging opportunity – for another, so this is a great initiative.

“The ASPIRE platform has been instrumental is repurposing items such as old carpet underlay, used office chairs, flat car batteries, animal waste, and more.

“Redlands Coast has an innovative business sector and I have no doubt plenty of local business leaders will use this platform to continue serving the community.

“While the ASPIRE interface is user-friendly, its database uses complex algorithms to connect those who have waste products to dispose of with those who can reuse, repair, remake and recycle the products; which translates into revenue, cost savings, resource recovery and environmental benefits for all.

“What’s particularly exciting is the regional scope of the CCIQ ecoBiz ASPIRE Pilot, with Gold Coast and Logan councils also coming on board.

“This will increase the available trading partners and goods on offer locally, making for a robust online marketplace to develop our regional circular economy.”

Fantastic benefits for businesses include:
• Waste disposal cost savings (including the State Government’s Waste Disposal Levy)
• Potential to trade waste and earn revenue
• Diversion of renewable resources from landfill
• Creation of new supply chains
• CO2 emission savings.

Cr Williams said the ASPIRE platform was already up and running, so interested business operators could jump online the ASPIRE website for a look around, and to view helpful online tutorials and register.

“Our official Redlands Coast launch will be during National Recycling Week at the 2020 Redlands Coast Business and Jobs Expo, where you can stop by the Redland City Council stand, talk to our officers and see a demonstration,” she said.

“This continues Council’s commitment to partnering with local businesses, including the recently launched Championing Redlands Coast initiative.“

Official ASPIRE trial Launch
When: Thursday 19 November 2020
Where: 2020 Redlands Coast Business and Jobs Expo, Alexandra Hills Hotel

For more information and assistance with tapping into this exciting business opportunity, contact Council’s Economic Development team on 3829 8999.

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Recycle e-waste in exchange for a native tree


Redland City Council is encouraging mainland residents to recycle their e-waste and swap it for a free native tree.

Mayor Karen Williams said the initiative would help raise awareness of e-waste recycling to mark International E-Waste Day on 14 October 2020, with a twofold benefit.

“Council hopes to collect 20 tonnes of e-waste from 14 to 18 October and aims to give away about 500 trees in exchange over the same period,” she said.

“Not only will Council be able to recycle this e-waste, thus reducing our carbon emissions, there will also be positive environmental impacts through the planting of hundreds of native trees throughout Redlands Coast.”

Cr Williams said Council was committed to reducing the amount of e-waste going to landfill.

“E-waste is one of the fastest growing waste streams globally and in the last financial year Council received 256 tonnes of e-waste,” she said.

“All items collected are taken to a facility where they are pulled apart and the various components of glass, plastic, wire and metal are sent for recycling; in fact almost 95 per cent of the materials are recovered for further use.

“Council ran a similar e-waste collection drive for island residents in February 2020 and collected more than two tonnes of e-waste, and we plan to hold another drive in February 2021.”

The trees for e-waste campaign runs from 14 to 18 October at Redland Bay and Birkdale recycling and waste centres.

Both are open every day from 7am to 5.30pm.

There is a limit of one tree per household in exchange for e-waste, and there are about 250 tree vouchers available at both recycling and waste centres.

Trees can be collected from either IndigiScapes Nursery on weekdays or IndigiScapes Centre on weekends.

Council accepts e-waste year round at its two mainland recycling and waste centres at Redland Bay and Birkdale, and runs annual collection drives to the island centres.

E-waste items suitable for recycling include:

  • TVs, interactive displays, digital displays, data projectors, video and tape players
  • Computer equipment: desktops/workstations, monitors, thin clients, all-in-ones, notebooks and tablets, monitors including CRTs, servers and storage arrays, switches and routers
  • Mobile phones
  • Printers, copiers and multi-function printers
  • POS equipment
  • Small kitchen, bathroom and laundry appliances: toasters, kettles, hairdryers, shavers and irons
  • Power drills, fans, vacuums and sound systems

For more information on Council’s waste and recycling centres, visit the redlnd.cc/e-waste.

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Recycled tyres drive change at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre


An innovative tyre recycling program is driving change at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre.

Council is working with road construction company RPQ Group to use crumbed rubber blended bitumen to resurface a 22,000sq m upper level section of the recycling and waste centre.

Mayor Karen Williams said the upgrade works would repurpose 550 used tyres.

“We know our approach to waste management makes a difference to our local community, our region and the world around us,” she said.

“Our choices impact quality of life for the 157,000 residents who call Redlands Coast home, as well as future generations.

“The more we can recycle, reuse and recover, the less waste needs to go to landfill.”

Cr Williams said RPQ Group was working with local governments to support the recycling industry and utilise their products in construction projects.

“Council engages a tyre recycling contractor but Australia does currently generate 56 million used tyres every year,” Cr Williams said.

“In 2019-2020 RPQ Group sprayed 18 million litres of crumbed rubber throughout Queensland and NSW, recycling the equivalent of about 280,000 tyres.

“Crumbed rubber blended bitumen is becoming a preferred treatment for environmentally conscious councils, ensuring a viable and ongoing market for recycled tyre products.”

Cr Williams said that each year, on average, Council sent 135 tonnes of tyres received at its recycling and waste centres to a recycling facility – with none being sent to landfill.

“Once shredded, the crumbed rubber is used for construction projects, infill in synthetic grass and playground matting and, equestrian products,” Cr Williams said.

“Powdered recycled tyres are used in glue for the building industry while larger chips are also used by sporting clubs as bullet stop in their shooting range.”

Cr Williams said the Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre project was a practical example of Council supporting the circular economy, the recycling industry and local business.

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges said the resurfacing at Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre would upgrade the drop-off area for green waste, scrap metal, timber, tyres, bricks and concrete, asbestos/cement sheeting, fridges/air conditioning, clean soil, e-waste, car batteries and LPG bottles.

“Transfer stations are no longer just about dumping waste, they are where innovation in recycling and alternative uses are trialled and I am pleased the Birkdale facility is at the heart of that innovation,” Cr Huges said.

She said the centre was currently closed while the upgrades and site maintenance was being carried out, but it was scheduled to reopen on August 17.

“I appreciate the community’s patience and understanding while these vital works are completed.”

Cr Huges reminded residents to either hold onto waste and recyclables or make use of the Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre while the Birkdale facility was closed, with commercial operators being asked to use alternative facilities during this period.

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