Category Archives: Environment

276,000kg of paint and packaging diverted from landfill


Redland Coast residents and tradies have diverted 276,592kg of paint and packaging from landfill over the past three years.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redland City Council had worked with the Paintback Scheme since its inception in July 2018 to divert unwanted paint products through the Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre.

“In our continuous journey towards a circular economy, it is important that Council seeks out innovative partnerships to dispose of all sorts of waste, so that, where possible, it goes on to have another life,” Cr Williams said.

“Paintback is one such partnership, keeping toxic materials out of drains and kerbside collection bins – and ultimately waterways and landfill – with its collection site at Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre.

“I encourage residents and commercial operators to continue to bring paint that can’t be reused into Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre to give it a second life.”

Deputy Mayor and Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said that while it cost nothing to drop off up to 100 litres of unwanted paint per visit, the paint did need to be secured in containers of 20 litres or less.

“From Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre, the unwanted paint is transported for treatment and repurposing,” she said.

“Currently, it’s being turned into an alternative fuel source replacing coal or having the water extracted and used by other industries, reducing the need to use mains water.

“I understand Paintback is funding research into how it can improve the recovery of paint and pails to reduce demand on virgin resources.”

The following items are accepted:

  • Interior and exterior paint (including architectural paint) – water and solvent based
  • Deck coatings
  • Floor paints
  • Primers
  • Undercoats
  • Sealers
  • Stains
  • Shellacs
  • Varnishes
  • Urethanes
  • Wood coatings (containing no pesticides).
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Council adopts city-wide Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy


Redland City Council has today adopted its Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy (CHAS), a comprehensive, long-term, coastal hazard management plan.

The CHAS is a city-wide strategy to protect the city’s coastline and islands and includes recommended actions to help Council and other stakeholders, including property owners, adapt to coastal hazards such as erosion, storm tide inundation and sea level rise up to the year 2100.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams, who chaired the project’s steering committee, said the adoption of the CHAS was a great achievement for both Council and the Redlands Coast community.

“Today, we reached a key milestone in protecting Redlands Coast against coastal hazards,” she said.

“The CHAS assessed the vulnerability of infrastructure, assets and property to coastal hazards and identified a range of city-wide actions and adaptation responses to assist Council and other stakeholders, including property owners, utility providers, local businesses, and community organisations now and into the future.

“The strategy will help us implement cost-effective mitigation measures, manage development and growth, budget for higher costs, collaborate regionally and seek funding opportunities.

“I’d like to thank the community and external advisory group for being a part of this journey and providing feedback into several of the project’s phases and the draft strategy.”

Cr Williams said the CHAS outlined where coastal protection infrastructure and management strategies would be required, as well as the timing and triggers for these interventions.

“The CHAS recommends a range of actions to enhance Redlands Coast’s adaptive capacity by gathering and sharing information that in turn identifies how infrastructure and assets may need to be modified in response to emerging hazards,” she said.

“The next steps for Council include embedding the consideration of coastal hazard risks and adaptation actions into our planning practices and processes, planning and delivering coastal protection works and initiatives based on an improved understanding of risks and impacts and appropriate adaptation responses and timeframes, and engaging utility and service providers to assist them in adapting their infrastructure and assets to coastal hazards, to the benefit of the community.

“The recommended adaption actions will be continually informed by community input and ideas, new knowledge, and monitoring the effectiveness of actions, and I encourage everyone to visit Council’s online project page to view the final CHAS and look through the online resources.”

Council’s CHAS has been developed in line with and is partly funded through the Local Government Association of Queensland’s QCoast2100 program.

To view the CHAS or for more information about the project, please visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/CHAS.

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Council contributes funding to coastal research project


Research into the causes of coastal erosion at Amity Point (Pulan Pulan) on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) has been given a funding boost of almost $100,000 by Redland City Council.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council was funding the next phase of the university research project which would provide a valuable picture of the coastal processes occurring at the northern tip of the island and how it could be protected.

“We are joining with the Australian Research Council Linkage Funding Scheme to fund the second phase of this study by the University of Queensland, University of Newcastle and American university Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University over the next three years,” Cr Williams said.

“It is vital research work that will provide the Redlands Coast community with insight into what triggers erosion at Amity Point and provide Council and foreshore landowners with data to inform coastal protection works.

“The idea for this research project first came about during the earlier phases of Council’s Amity Point Shoreline Erosion Management Plan project, which underscored the importance of investigating and understanding the causes of events known as flow slides in the area.

“This led to Council funding the project’s preliminary research stage in 2017, which revealed the Rainbow Channel played a significant role in foreshore slumping along Amity Point.

“The second phase of this project, which started early this year, now seeks to understand the causes of flow slides at Amity Point and analyse their link with the Rainbow Channel that flows between the northern end of North Stradbroke Island and the southern end of Moreton Island (Moorgumpin).”

University of Queensland’s Dr Dave Callaghan, who is a member of the research team, said coastal flow slides appeared as sudden erosion in a focussed area along the shoreline, causing the foreshore to collapse.

“The flow slides have been referred to as ‘sinkholes’. This is, however, inappropriate because ‘sinkholes’ appear in association with surface soil slipping into underground cavities. There are no cavities under the Amity Point area. The observed coastal flow slides are triggered by coastal processes including waves, winds and tidal currents, which transport sand and lead to the erosion of shorelines,” Dr Callaghan said.

“Over the next three years, project work will include on-site and satellite image-based surveys of the Rainbow Channel and surrounding waters, tidal monitoring, flow slide and coastline studies, data analysis and modelling of flow slides. The team will then share the research data for peer review at domestic and international conferences.”

Councillor for North Stradbroke Island Peter Mitchell said he was pleased Council could support this research and recognised the work would help foreshore landowners prepare for flow slide events.

“By investigating how and why these flow slide events occur, foreshore landowners at Amity Point have better information to assist them in making preparations to protect their properties,” Cr Mitchell said.

“Council also has an Amity Point Shoreline Erosion Management Plan and Implementation Plan in place, available on Council’s Your Say webpage, which further assists foreshore landowners in taking the necessary steps to protect their property from flow slide events.”

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Redlands Coast Eastern Escarpment upgrades create a regional recreational destination


Redland City Mayor Karen Williams and the Honourable Mick de Brenni MP, Member for Springwood, have met with excited users to take in and celebrate recent improvements through the Redlands Coast Eastern Escarpment Hinterland Experience project.

Councillor Williams said the upgraded Redlands Coast Eastern Escarpment Conservation Area was already being enjoyed by many avid cyclists, bushwalkers, horse riders and nature lovers.

“The major upgrade to this naturally wonderful area has long been on Council’s to-do list and we are delighted that Council’s works were able to be brought forward as a result of Queensland Government’s COVID Works for Queensland funding of $2,050,000 last year,” Cr Williams said.

“Today is a celebration of what can be achieved when different levels of government work collaboratively together to deliver for the community.

“Eastern Escarpment is part of a broader trail network across Redlands and through to Logan with this upgrade enhancing visitor access to recreation and natural areas while protecting biodiversity across this region.

“It was wonderful to meet rising mountain biking (MTB) star, 16-year-old Bailey Meares, and adaptive mountain biker (aMTB), Renee Junga today.

“Bailey – who last year was ranked seventh in the country for Gravity Events such as Downhill and Enduro Racing – tells me he loves the two new black diamond runs, which provide scope of his intense training schedule just five minutes from his school, Sheldon College.

“Renee – who had an accident when training for the Beijing Olympics as part of Australia’s first BXM squad – has more recently taken up adaptive mountain biking and provided accessibility advice so that trails suitable for aMBT could be included at Eastern Escarpment.”

Minister for Energy, Renewables and Hydrogen, Minister for Public Works and Procurement and Member for Springwood Mick de Brenni said the Queensland Government had provided Council with $2.8m for works to the Eastern Escarpment and the Cleveland Aquatic Centre as part of its plan for Queensland’s economic recovery from Covid 19.

“Our government was keen to support more investment in high quality mountain bike trails to meet the growing demand for this incredibly popular sport,” Mr de Brenni said.

“As a mountain biker myself, I’d like to acknowledge the team who delivered the project which has been acclaimed as one of the best rides anywhere in southeast Queensland.

“This Queensland Government Covid-19 Works for Queensland project has created jobs in delivering the infrastructure itself and more broadly in local tourism, hospitality and the cycling economy.”

Redland City Deputy Mayor and Councillor for Division 6, Julie Talty said the popularity of the area had greatly increased since word got out about the new trails and facilities.

“In addition to upgrading 7 km of existing trails, more than 13km of new trails have been created with new wayfinding signage, along with new viewing opportunities out to our Moreton Bay Islands,” Cr Talty said.

“New trailhead facilities at Gate 2 (near Schoek Road) include a small sealed car park, amenities, potable water and shelter with signage incorporating a map.

“As well as providing an improved experience for recreational users, the upgraded trails will also provide better access for the effective management of weeds and fires in the reserve.”

Council bought the 186.68ha parcel of land in 2008, and in 2017 began formal planning for the reserve in consultation with trail runners, bush walkers, horse riders, mountain bike riders, environmental groups, neighbours and the community.

The Redlands Coast Eastern Hinterland Experience was fully funded by the State Government through its 2020-21 COVID Works for Queensland program.

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Bio-retention basin improves stormwater quality from recycling and waste centre


A new bio-retention basin has been constructed alongside Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre to improve the quality of stormwater discharged into nearby waterways.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said as well as the environmental benefits, the basin would also reduce maintenance and operational costs associated with managing stormwater and stormwater infrastructure.

“The construction of the bio-retention basin is part of a wider scope of works at the site following the remediation of the landfill in 2017, and construction of the asphalt hardstand for stockpiled materials in 2020.

“Stormwater runoff from the Recycling and Waste Centre has the potential to cause water contamination or environmental harm in the areas where it is discharged, namely Tarradarrapin Creek which in turn flows into Waterloo Bay.

“However, the water treated through the bio-retention basin will be of a higher quality than previously managed through the stormwater pond it is replacing.”

Playing a pivotal role in that improved water quality are almost 3000 native grasses and plants which cover about 425 sq m of the basin.

Native grasses and plants will play an integral role in the new bio-retention basin alongside Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre.

“The stormwater quality onsite improved significantly following the completion of the asphalt hardstand,” Cr Williams said.

“Now the bio-retention basin is complete, the stormwater will meet quality standards without the requirement for treatment before being discharged, as any sediment or nutrients in the stormwater will be filtered by the plant and filtration media (a combination of soil, sand and gravel).”

Cr Williams said Council saved time and a lot of money on the basin’s construction by using a new product to transform a large amount of silt and contaminated sludge at the bottom of the previous stormwater pond.

“This innovative mud stabilisation product transformed the sludge into a usable material which was then incorporated with other materials to construct the bio-retention basin,” she said.

“The use of this product saved more than $275,000 and reduced construction time by three weeks, achieving a great environmental and financial outcome for the city.”

Division 8 Councillor Tracey Huges said the bio-retention basin met the expectations and compliance standards set by the Department of Environment and Science and modern environmental standards required for an operating waste facility.

“Last year Council resurfaced the gravel area on top of the hill with an innovative bitumen seal that used recycled tyres,” Cr Huges said.

“Earlier this year Council repaired a stormwater drain which had been damaged following heavy rain.

“Now, with the completion of the bio-retention basin on the western perimeter of the Birkdale Recycling and Waste Centre, Council has ensured there is modern and best practice stormwater management infrastructure in place to capture any fine particles or sediment generated through operations onsite.”

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Take your disposable face masks to IndigiScapes for recycling


Redlands IndigiScapes Centre has extended its specialist recycling station to trial a TerraCycle Face Mask Zero Waste Box to recycle single-use face masks on behalf of the Redlands Coast community.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the move came after concerns were raised about the additional litter and burden on landfill resulting from all the disposable masks being worn throughout the pandemic.

“The fact that disposable face masks are not accepted in our kerbside recycling hasn’t presented a problem before, but we find ourselves in changing times,” Cr Williams said.

“As Council’s environmental education hub, IndigiScapes, already houses a recycling station for items such as CDs, VHS, toothbrushes and toothpaste and x-rays; it is the ideal location to trial mask disposal as well.

“Now residents can drop all types of single-use face masks in the TerraCycle box at the Centre, which provides a sustainable and convenient disposal solution.

“When full, the box will be returned to TerraCycle, where the waste will be quarantined for at least three months.

“The contents of the box will then be manually sorted and shredded. The metal from the nose clips is smelted and the plastic is melted down into low-grade plastic pellets. The recycled pellet material is then used by third parties to manufacture a variety of new products including outdoor furniture, park benches and decking.”

Councillor for Division 7 Rowanne McKenzie said that Council encouraged everyone to follow the Queensland Health guidelines on safe disposals of masks.

“Whilst the box is lined with a plastic bag so no one can come into contact with the waste, Queensland Health guidelines require face masks to be placed in a sealed bag prior to disposal,” she said.

“Only non-woven disposable plastic-based face masks can be placed in the mask disposal box at IndigiScapes, including 3-ply surgical, dust masks, KN95, and N95 masks.

“Do not bring in cloth masks or other types of protective gear like gloves, hair nets, or lab coats and garments.

“The mask disposal box is situated in the foyer of IndigiScapes and accessible during the centre’s opening hours, 8am-4pm, seven days per week.

“Why not visit the native nursery, wander through the native botanic gardens, go for a bushwalk or drop into the café while you’re there.

“It’s a naturally wonderful experience.”

Redlands IndigiScapes Centre is located at 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba.

Visit redland.qld.gov.au/waste for more information about waste and recycling and indigiscapes.redland.qld.gov.au to find out what IndigiScapes has to offer.

To learn more about TerraCycle and its programs visit terracycle.com.au.

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Super six tourism experiences for long weekend


Naturally wonderful Redlands Coast is having a big weekend in October and the rest of Greater Brisbane is invited.

Redland City Council is rolling out a tourism campaign highlighting great Redlands Coast getaway ideas which are “just up the road yet a world away” for neighbouring communities whose Ekka long weekend was delayed.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was the perfect spot for Greater Brisbane residents to spend the big break from Friday 29 October, with Council working with local tourism operators and businesses to ensure exceptional COVID-safe experiences.

She said island and coastal escapes in the heart of Quandamooka traditional country were a specialty.

“We have an amazing 335km of coastline and, with fast ferry services available to all our islands, it doesn’t take long to immerse yourself in a whole new world, whether it is taking in the stunning beaches, wildlife and rich cultural history of North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), heading for a family beach holiday on Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) or relaxing at the bowls club with the best-ever view on Macleay Island (Jencoomercha),” Cr Williams said.

“While on Minjerribah, it really is worth joining an Aboriginal Cultural Walk with a Quandamooka guide and hearing sacred stories dating back more than 21,000 years.

“For water sports lovers, there are a number of canoe and kayak launching pontoons if you have your own water craft or you can hire a standup paddleboard, canoe or kayak from one of the local waterfront businesses, join a guided tour or sign up for a sailing adventure.

“There’s also a three-day long weekend visitor itinerary to guide you around our tourism treasures.”

Redlands Coast’s thriving food scene offers on-trend bars, micro-breweries and outstanding dining options.

“There’s no doubt you will find something to satisfy everyone’s taste, with the Redlands Coast online food trail directory a great place to start,” Cr Williams said.

“Visitors hoping to reconnect with nature also won’t be disappointed, with plenty of great experiences from guided eco-education tours by Ranger Stacey at Redland City Council’s IndigiScapes Centre, to bayside and hinterland wildlife spotting, and Point Lookout (Mooloomba) boardwalk on Minjerribah from where you can see an incredible array of marine creatures.

“October is also a great time for divers to see the famous annual visitors to Minjerribah’s Manta ray Bommie, while humpback whales continue on their annual migration past Point Lookout (Mulumba) – one of Australia’s best land-based whale-watching destinations.

“Those who prefer more energetic land-based pursuits, Redlands Coast is blessed with some of the region’s best hinterland mountain bike, hiking and horse riding trails, with more than 60km of tracks in the Bayview Conservation Area alone, which is home to koalas, goannas, glossy black-cockatoos, wallabies and powerful owls. There is also almost 240ha of natural conservation bushland at Redlands Track Park, along with the many kilometres of off-road cycling routes across Redlands Coast.”

Redlands Coast offers a range of accommodation options from island waterfront cottages and camping and beachfront resorts on Minjerribah to glamping at Mount Cotton’s (Boolimba) Sirromet Winery and hinterland getaways.

Half a dozen of the best

Redlands Coast’s October long weekend getaway options can be as relaxing or adventurous as you like. Here’s six to get you started.

Enjoy local arts on the Minjerribah arts trail.

  1. Immerse in a Quandamooka experience. Redlands Coast’s traditional heritage and culture is rich indeed and well worth getting to know. Go to quandamookacoast.com.au or YuraTours.com.au for details of guided cultural tours on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). You can also book a Goompi Trail experience with a Quandamooka guide booked through Stradbroke Ferries which explores Dunwich (Goompi) and covers aspects of Aboriginal life such as the fish ring, bush medicines, local food and how artefacts are made. Complete the experience with a visit to Salt Water Murris’ Quandamooka Aboriginal Art Gallery (9am-2pm, Tuesday-Friday, 8.30am-12.30pm weekends); Island Arts Gallery (open every day 9am-2pm); and Delvene Cockatoo-Collins Studio, renowned Quandamooka artist, where you can buy her handmade wares or immerse in Delvene’s personally guided Art Walk and weaving workshop. Talk to the helpful staff at the Redlands Coast Visitor Information Centre, open 7 days from 9am – 4pm, or phone 1300 667 386, about the cultural tours available.

Wales off North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah).

  1. Go land-based whale watching. The humpback whale migration continues in October, so while you are on Straddie, head to picturesque North Gorge Walk at Point Lookout (Mulumba) and see who can spot the first whale (or a heap of other marine creatures). It is rated one of the best land-based whale-watching spots on the Southern Hemisphere.  If you get the taste for it, you can also get fresh seafood straight from the trawler with Rufus King located at Amity Point (Pulan). Travel to and around the island costs about $30 for an adult (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass) and $16 for a child (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass). Alternatively, Stradbroke Ferries are running specials on selected dates that allow you to take a car over at a discounted rate, so check their website.

  1. Experience Island time in no time on Coochie. Taking the short 10-minute ferry ride over to Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) from Victoria Point (Warrer Warrer) really is one of the best quick escapes in South-East Queensland. The sheltered beach is a little piece of paradise with plenty of barbecue and picnic spots, or you can hire a pontoon barbecue boat or head off on the island’s awesome coastal walking trails. There’s a cafe nearby with its own art gallery offering homemade meals and refreshments. Adults can travel on the water taxi for $10 return and children for only $5 return.

The Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area is great for bush walking.

  1. Hit the tracks. Warm up with a hike to Mount Cotton (Jungalpin) summit for views out to Moreton and North Stradbroke Islands (it’s particularly beautiful at sunrise or sunset). You can begin at the Eastern Escarpment Conservation Area, Gate 2, West Mt Cotton Road (opposite Schoeck Road), Mount Cotton – suitable for hikers, mountain bike riders and horseriders. If that isn’t enough, why not walk or cycle the Eddie Santagiuliana Way from Cleveland to Thornlands (wheelchair and pram friendly) or take in the wild surrounds of Redlands Track Park, Bayview Conservation Park, Venman’s National Park, Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area or the Southern Moreton Bay islands.

  1. Connect with nature. IndigiScapes Environmental Education Centre and Café, located in Capalaba (Kapallaba) is an awesome place for families to go for a wander to learn about our naturally wonderful environment, dine at the eco café, overlooking the natural bushlands, with meals inspired from spices of the bush. Kids will have a blast at the discovery centre and outdoor adventure trails. You’ll find all the details at indigiscapes.redland.qld. gov.au

Macleay Island

  1. Go island hopping. Bring your Go Card and catch the water taxi from Redland Bay (Talwalpin) and make your way around the Southern Moreton Bay Islands. Karragarra Island is the first stop, just a 15-minute ride from the terminal, and a great spot for a picnic on the foreshore and maybe a visit to the community gardens. Next is Macleay Island (Jencoomercha) where you can enjoy a meal on the deck after a fun game of barefoot bowls with its stunning views. Just a short stroll from the bowls club, you’ll find the Macleay Island Arts Complex, showcasing proud local artists wares (10am-3pm, Tuesday-Sunday; art classes available). It is then on to Lamb Island (Ngudooroo), a 2km x 1km peaceful island where you can enjoy the local fishing spots and unwind in the natural environment. Then another seven-minute ferry ride to Russell Island (Canaipa) where there are conveniently located cafes, the perfect spot to enjoy views over Canaipa Passage out to North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). On the water taxi, inter-island travel is free so you can do the whole trip for $16 return for an adult and $8 return for children ages 5-14 year, 0–4 years travel for free. Or for a shorter island trip, walk to King Island at Wellington Point.

Find out more about Redlands Coast getaways by calling the Visitor Information Centre on 1300 667 386 or by going to visitredlandscoast.com.au

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Exciting vision for Birkdale Community Precinct


Redland City Council has formally adopted the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document – another step towards creation of an exciting community heart for Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the ideas from the community and presented as a spatial representation in the vision document provided an exciting glimpse at what the 62-hectare site could become.

The vision concept plan.

“This is not the Council’s vision for the site; it is what the community told us they would like to see there,” Cr Williams said.

“To see many of the ideas suggested by the community during our sensationally supported engagement phase actually placed on a map really gives you an impression of how large a scale this vision is and how much can be accommodated on the precinct.

“It shows how the precinct could operate effectively with a multitude of purposes and outcomes and is an exciting glimpse into what our future generations can enjoy.

“It also begins to show the broader picture. Birkdale Community Precinct will have benefits well beyond its boundaries with major public transport upgrades; employment opportunities during its establishment and then ongoing; and as an attractive location for enterprises and ventures across a wide spectrum.”

Cr Williams said the vision placed a range of rural experiences around a restored Willards Farm.

“It could operate in tandem with bush tucker gardens and agritourism opportunities and more,” she said.

“It respects and protects the precinct’s valuable natural habitat while also providing plenty of room for bush walks, wetlands boardwalks, an aquatic centre and adventure play hub, open lawn spaces and eco-camping facilities.

“The vision places the Redland Whitewater Centre – which will be an event venue for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games – in an existing cleared area adjacent to the aquatic centre and with the area possibly having canoe access from Tingalpa Creek. It clearly shows the centre and associated aquatic playground takes up just a small portion of the overall site.

“The heritage-listed former World War II radio receiving station takes pride of place in the centre of a pedestrian spine running through the precinct, offering the possibility of a memorial site as well as World War II artefact displays. This sits next to a First Nations ceremonial space and cultural history centre.”

Cr Williams said the vision showed Birkdale Community Precinct’s potential to be transformed into a world-class precinct that would be a multi-generational showpiece for Redlands Coast.

“It will be a picturesque, vibrant and diverse destination which provides benefits beyond its boundaries in helping to define Redlands Coast,” she said.

“The plan doesn’t represent a completed design that is ready to be built. It is instead an interpretation of what it could look like.

“This document brings together the ideas gathered from the community during an extensive seven-week engagement program and presents them as concepts. It will be used to inform a draft master plan for the precinct for which there will be further extensive community engagement.

“The vision document is structured around the precinct’s significant heritage, cultural and conservation values, all of which will be protected.

“Remember, this was Commonwealth land before Council bought it in December 2019 to save it from being subdivided after the Federal Government had earmarked it for about 400 housing lots.

“To see it on the path to becoming a world-class community asset is such an achievement.”

Cr Williams said this stage in the visioning process had been shaped by a huge and unprecedented response from the Redlands Coast community.

“When the community was invited to help create a shared vision for the site during the engagement program which ran from March to May this year, the response was phenomenal,” she said.

“All of those, literally, thousands of ideas and creative suggestions and discussions and sharing of personal stories, are now coming together to form the heart of this precinct.

“This is a long-term project that delivers on the diverse views our community showed us they had for future use of this unique site.

“The community will continue to have ongoing input into the planning for what is shaping up as potentially one of this city’s finest achievements.”

Precinct Vision highlights:

Adopted by Redland City Council on 18 August, 2021, the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document is an overarching framework to guide decision making and allow individuals, institutions and businesses to establish a dialogue about the prospective future of the precinct. It brings together the multitude of ideas gathered during the engagement process and presents them spatially on the site as concepts.

Environment and ecology

Whether it’s a bush walk on an Aboriginal art trail or wetlands boardwalk, kayaking along Tingalpa Creek, learning about local wildlife and landscape stewardship on an overnight camping trip, or taking in the scenery from a treetop walk – the precinct could deliver a multitude of sustainable ways for visitors to enjoy and experience the landscape. Key elements include: wetlands walk, bush walks, eco-camping and treetop walk.

Agriculture and rural tradition

The legacy of Willards Farm presents a unique opportunity to create a dynamic cluster of agritourism destinations and community assets that celebrate the region’s rural tradition and history. Key elements include: Willards agrifarm experience, flexible farmer’s market space and paddock-to-plate café and dining.

Heritage and history

Birkdale Community Precinct could incorporate the respectful protection, adaptation and reuse of the area’s significant heritage assets through showcasing local First Nations stories and land management practises and celebrating and reusing Willards Farm and the US Army Corps-built World War II radio receiving station. Key elements include: connection to Country, pioneer past and World War II history

Adventure and recreation

The precinct could offer a dynamic and diverse range of adventurous experiences that cater to all ages and abilities, while also establishing a world-class destination for live sport and events – a truly multidimensional destination with something for everybody, keeping visitors coming back for more. Key elements include: Redland Whitewater Centre, aquatic centre, swimming and water play, adventure play hub and flexible events lawns.

Education and discovery

Engaging learning experiences could be embedded throughout the precinct, with opportunities for local stewardship showcasing everything from Traditional Owner land management techniques and wildlife education, renaturalising processes, as well as innovative agricultural research and technologies. Key elements include: bush tucker garden, ag-tech hub and wildlife and landcare centre.

For more information on Birkdale Community Precinct, go to: yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/imagine

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Islands work funded under stimulus package


Macleay and Russell islands residents are getting a smoother run and a fun park refresh thanks to two works programs funded by a COVID-19 recovery stimulus package.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said road green-sealing work on the islands and a renewal of the Jackson Oval Park play space on Russell Island had been funded under the second phase of the Australian Government’s Local Roads and Community Infrastructure (LRCI) program.

“This Australian Government stimulus funding is over and above Council’s own stimulus spending program,” Cr Williams said.

“The latest round of Redlands Coast-based projects approved under the second phase includes $621,500 for road green sealing on Macleay and Russell islands.

“This work involves using a two-coat bitumen seal to suppress and manage dust and prevent the environmental impact of gravel loss from unsealed roads on the islands.

“It will also improve stormwater management by reshaping roadside drains. Work is scheduled to continue to run through into November, weather permitting.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards said the second island project funded under the LRCI program was a $214,000 renovation of the Jackson Oval Park play node on Russell Island.

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards at Jackson Oval Park on Russell Island during the renovation works.

“The existing play equipment at Jackson Oval had reached the end of its usable life, so I am delighted to see the renewed play facilities for residents and visitors as well as the sporting groups that use the site,” he said.

“The park renewal and the green-sealing are part of more than $5 million being invested in Redlands Coast community infrastructure under the funding.”

The Australian Government’s LRCI program supports local councils to deliver priority projects while supporting jobs and the resilience of local economies to help communities bounce back from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Australian Government has committed $5.3 million to works in Redlands City under the LRCI Program Phase 2.

 

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Council closures during COVID-19 lockdown


The Queensland Government has today announced a three-day lockdown due to COVID-19 for 11 local government areas across south-east Queensland, including Redland City.

Redland City Council’s essential services will continue during the lockdown, with other services operating online or closing for the duration of the lockdown, which is currently from 4pm Saturday 31 July to 4pm Tuesday 3 August 2021.

Kerbside rubbish collection and recycling and waste centres will continue to operate, but now is not the time for a general clean-up.

Other south-east Queensland local government areas affected by the health directive are Brisbane, Ipswich, Logan, Moreton Bay, Sunshine Coast, Noosa, Somerset, Lockyer Valley, Scenic Rim and Gold Coast.

Queensland Health has advised that from 4pm today, people in these areas will be required to stay at home except for essential purposes, including buying food and medications, accessing health care or providing support, exercising locally, and undertaking essential work and study that cannot be done from home.

Masks must be carried everywhere and worn in all indoor spaces and outdoors spaces, except where exemptions apply. Please keep informed by visiting the Queensland Health website.

Under the restrictions, the following Redland City Council services will move online or close to the public from today Saturday 31 July 2021 until close of business on Tuesday 3 August 2021, pending further advice from the Queensland Government.

This includes:

Council’s Customer Service Centres
Customer Service Centres at Cleveland, Capalaba and Victoria Point will be closed for the duration of the lockdown, but Council’s online and telephone services will continue.

Council’s Customer Contact Centre is available for all phone enquiries on (07) 3829 8999 Monday to Friday, 8am–5pm, excluding public holidays.

Libraries
Redland Libraries closed at 12pm Saturday 31 July, but the libraries’ extensive online services will continue, including e-books, e-audio books, e-magazines, music, movies and children’s stories.

Return chutes will also be closed with loan and hold periods extended.  No late fees will be incurred.  To access our digital library services, visit our website or download the app from the App Store or Play Store.

Art Galleries
Council’s Art Galleries will be closed for the duration of the lockdown.

RPAC

Redland Performing Arts Centre will be closed for the duration of the lockdown. All scheduled performances and workshops have been postponed.  See RPAC website www.rpac.com.au for latest performance updates.

IndigiScapes Centre
Closed.

Visitor Information Centre
While the Visitor Information Centre at Raby Bay closed at 12pm Saturday 31 July, information will still be available by phone on 1300 667 386 or visit the Redlands Coast website.

Redland Animal Shelter
The gates to Redland Animal Shelter will be closed, with onsite staff available for appointments and emergency drop-offs only.

Community halls
Indoor venues, including community halls, will be closed.

Public swimming pools
Cleveland Aquatic Centre will be closed. Bay Islands Aquatic Centre is already closed for winter.

RecycleWorld
RecycleWorld at Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre will be closed.

Recycling and Waste Centres

While our Recycling and Waste Centres remain open, Council urges residents to avoid generating unnecessary waste and avoid visiting the facilities unless absolutely necessary. Social distancing and safety requirements apply.

More information
Watch Council’s website and social media for updates. The Queensland Government is the lead agency in managing the public health response to COVID-19.

For more information about the health directive and the latest health advice, visit health.qld.gov.au

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