Category Archives: Environment

Native orchids strike a pose right across Redlands Coast


Redlands Coast has been putting on an unexpected display of late, with recent rain resulting in bumper flowering of native orchids.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was home to a number of Australia’s 1200 species of native orchids, many of which were not found in any other countries.

“The largest local mass flowerings in 10 years have recently been observed by Redland City Council officers who support and regularly visit local properties participating in the Land For Wildlife program,” Cr Williams said.

Slender hyacinth orchid, Dipodium variegatum

“Often orchid plants can be difficult to find and get overlooked, so such a spectacular and broad flowering event provides a great chance to rediscover orchids that have been dormant.

“We’re encouraging all Redlands Coast residents and visitors to keep an eye out for these beauties while bushwalking or otherwise enjoying our conservation areas.

“If you suspect you’ve found one, please take a photo and send it to our team, who can help you identify it.”

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said she was delighted to learn of the abundance of flowering orchids found on a Land for Wildlife property in Redland Bay with the help of young nature-lover Emily Wilkinson.

Emily Wilkinson with a flowering dipodium variegatum orchid found on her family’s Redland Bay property

“I hear Emily was keen to show our Environmental Partnerships team member around her property while undertaking her own nature treasure hunt,” Cr Talty said.

Councillor Williams said that, as a free voluntary program, Land For Wildlife encouraged and assisted private landholders such as Emily’s family to enhance habitats for native plants and animals on their properties.

“While supported locally by Council, the regionally coordinated program has just registered its 5000th participant in south east Queensland.”

“Your property can still be primarily managed for other purposes while reaping the benefits of the Land For Wildlife Program.”

To find out whether Land For Wildlife or one of our other Environmental Partnership Programs could benefit you and your property, visit indigiscapes.com.au or email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au.

Five finger orchid, Calandenia catenata

Send your native orchid photograph into Council for ID

Email environmentalpartnerships@redland.qld.gov.au with your photograph and details of where it was found but please don’t pick or dig it up.

Native orchids are protected by law and if you take them out of their natural environment they are unlikely to survive.

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Council adopts plan to maintain healthy waterways


Redland City Council has adopted a new plan to help maintain the health of local waterways and Moreton Bay.

Mayor Karen Williams said the development of the Redlands Coast Bay and Creeks Plan 2021-2031 and supplementary Action Plan 2021-2026 reflected an ongoing commitment to sustainable stewardship of our waterways and Moreton Bay.

“This plan provides a strategic approach to protect, maintain and enhance the resilience of our waterways and the bay,” she said.

“It aligns with and supports other Council plans and strategies, such as the Corporate Plan 2021-2026, the Coastal Adaption Strategy and the Conservation Land Management Strategy 2010.

“In conjunction with the Action Plan, it also operationalises Council’s implementation of the Lower Brisbane-Redlands Coastal Catchment Action Plan that Council endorsed in 2018.”

Cr Williams said management of the waterways and bay was a complex issue.

“There is need for a plan with a clear vision to identify priorities, set a clear future direction and drive coordinated and targeted actions,” she said.

“Council has invested significantly in assessing and improving the condition of our waterways and the bay, with initiatives such as waterways monitoring and assessment programs, implementing actions to reduce sediment loads from construction sites and through the commitment to plant one million native plants by 2026.

“While this work is yielding results, we recognise there are opportunities for improvement.

“The Action Plan identifies high priority activities Council will implement over the next five years to protect and enhance the resilience of the waterways and bay.”

Cr Williams said the plan’s aim was to ensure Council and community actions left a positive legacy for the future.

“Over the 10-year life of the plan we intend to develop a better understanding of what’s happening in our waterways and adjacent lands.

“We want to ensure we’re budgeting for ongoing maintenance of our waterways and operating at best practice. We also want to see an improvement in water quality.”

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Celebrate World Environment Day at IndigiScapes’ Environment and Community Fair


Celebrate this year’s World Environment Day at IndigiScapes’ Environment and Community Fair on Saturday 5 June. Entry is free.

Mayor Karen Williams said the Environment and Community Fair was one of the first major public events to be hosted at the expanded Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, which has been subject to various COVID-related restrictions since its reopening.

“As Redland City Council’s centre for environmental education, IndigiScapes is a much loved community asset that generations of Redlands Coast locals and visitors have visited and loved,” Cr Williams said.

“We are very proud of the upgrades that have been made, including the refurbishment of the buildings, interpretive centre and café, and improvement and relocation of the native plant nursery.”

“World Environment Day is a very fitting time to invite our community to rediscover all IndigiScapes has to offer while enjoying the Covid-safe, fun fair atmosphere.”

Ranger Stacey will MC the day

Division 7 Cr Rowanne McKenzie said there would be plenty on offer to keep the whole family engaged.

“Along with the eco markets, there will be environment and sustainability-themed speakers and information, free outdoor family activities, live entertainment and delicious food available from the café and food vans,” she said.

Councillor Williams said visitors would also be able to meet local wildlife as well as Council’s new environmental ambassador Ranger Stacey, who will be MC for the day.

“We’re so excited that Stacey has joined our team. Like us, she is passionate about Redlands Coast and is happy to chat about Council’s environmental programs and services,” Cr Williams said.

“Please make her welcome by coming to say hello.”

EVENT DETAILS

Environment and Community Fair
When: Saturday 5 June 2021, 9am to 2pm
Where: Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, 17 Runnymede Rd, Capalaba
Free entry.
Additional parking accessible via the Nursery entry or Lyndon Road and Korawal Street.

• Celebrate World Environment Day
• Meet Ranger Stacey and local wildlife
• Engage with environmental and community organisations and speakers
• Nursery open for native plant sales and advice
• Learn about Council programs and services
• Enjoy the Eco Markets, suitcase rummage and rack sale
• Free outdoor family activities, nature craft, art and face painting
• Enjoy entertainment and live music
• IndigiCafe open plus food and coffee vans.

More information: indigiscapes.redland.qld.gov.au

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Karragarra compost trial launch sows seeds for food waste recycling revolution


Karragarra Island Organics Composting Trial officially opens on April 30, heralding an important trailblazer for more community-based organics recycling schemes.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the collaboration between Council, the University of Queensland’s Centre for Recycling of Organic Waste and Nutrients (CROWN) and three island-based community groups was an important step closer to having a zero organic waste community.

“Karragarra Island produces about 16,000kg of organic food waste a year that goes to landfill,” Cr Williams said.

“It would be fantastic if that amount could be reduced by half.

“With 26 households already signed up, and capacity for a total of about 50 to join the trial, we are well on our way to testing if the community can do that.”

CROWN director Johannes Biala said the Karragarra Island project would be a model and source of information and inspiration for others to follow.

“It has placed Redlands Coast islands ahead of many mainland communities,” Mr Biala said.

“There is no doubt it will continue to thrive well beyond the trial end date in July 2021.”

CROWN has been a key driver in the composting scheme, helping to organise funding through a Goodman Foundation Moreton Bay (Quandamooka) Research Grant, engaging the community and designing the novel, forced-aeration composting system.

“The idea for the solar-powered composting system came from a California-based website,” Mr Biala said.

“Two solar panels are generating power that is stored in lithium batteries.

“This power is then converted to 240V and used to drive a blower, which operates on a time switch.

“Air is supplied via sub-surface pipes to the base of the new compost bays, which is then drawn up into the composted material due to the heat generated by the composting process.”

Division 5 Councillor Mark Edwards urged more island households to sign up to the trial.

“If more organic food waste can be retained for beneficial use within the island communities, it will not only be a great saving to Council but a clever way for islanders to become more self-sufficient as food growers,” Cr Edwards said.

“Taking part in the trial is a simple process, with supplied kitchen caddies and compostable liners available at Karragarra Community Garden.

“People can empty their caddies into 240-litre bins that have been placed at the community garden and near the island jetty.”

From left, Rose Childe of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, CROWN director Johannes Biala and Shirley Lindsay of Karragarra Community Garden.

Rose Childe, of Running Wild Youth Conservation Culture, said conservation and land management trainees would help process the compost.

“It’s an exciting opportunity for them to use the innovative technology and we’re pleased to be involved in something that engages with the community and ties in with the environmental focus of our organisation,” Ms Childe said.

Shirley Lindsay, of Karragarra Community Garden, said she was hopeful the trial would convert people to separating and composting food waste.

“I think people will want to be part of a great success story,” she said.

“The community garden would use all the compost generated for vegetable crops and fruit trees.

“As a good gardener, you can never have enough compost and mulch.

Jettie Berkhout, of SMBI Permaculture, said the trial aligned with permaculture principles.

“Permaculture is a way of living ethically, caring for the earth and taking care of people and future generations,” Ms Berkhout said.

“SMBI Permaculture believes this is a wonderful beginning in creating a resilient community on Karragarra Island. We hope this program is successful and it will extend soon to the other islands.”

 

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Order a green waste bin during May and be in the running to win one of 100 worm farms


Redlands Coast mainland householders have an opportunity to win a worm farm if they sign up for a green waste bin during the month of May.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the promotion was part of Council’s campaign to secure 500 green waste bin orders over the month, starting on 2 May to coincide with International Compost Awareness Week.

“Council wants to boost the uptake of green waste bins because of the benefits they represent for the environment, and because they are convenient and good value for garden lovers,” Cr Williams said.

“Green waste bins currently do not have an establishment fee and homeowners who order before 31 May 2021 will have the chance to go in the draw for one of the 100 worm farms that Council is giving away, valued at $89.95 each.”

An example of the $89.95 worm farms on offer for residents to win.

Cr Williams said at present the ongoing cost associated with a green waste bin equated to just $1.23 a week, or $16 a quarter.

“For keen gardeners who produce a lot of green waste, the fortnightly collection service for bins is an easy and convenient option when compared to loading up the trailer to take it to a recycling and waste centre,” she said.

“People also have the satisfaction of knowing they’ve helped weed out unnecessary waste going to landfill because green bin contents are turned into new enriching organic products, such as soils, soil enhancers and mulch.

“And winners will also get to test out how well worm farms work for composting food scraps in their own homes, which helps to further reduce overall waste sent to landfill.

“The May promotion is part of the broader Council target for 21,000 green waste bins to be in use by the end of 2021 and 35,000 by 2025.”

Green waste bins can be ordered online from Council’s website or by calling 3829 8999.

Acceptable green bin items are:

  • Garden prunings
  • Grass clippings (do not bag if using a green waste bin)
  • Shrubs
  • Weeds and flowers
  • Leaves and loose bark
  • Sawdust
  • Small branches or soft wood (no larger than 75cm in length or 10cm in diameter)

Further details

  • The promotion is only available to mainland residents and new customers.
  • Customers ordering a second bin will be eligible.
  • Annual fees apply and are subject to change.
  • Council recommends tenants interested in green bins contact Council and register their interest so that when green waste bins are available to tenants we can contact them directly. Alternatively, tenants can contact their landlords to request they order a bin on their behalf.
  • Island residents can register their interest by contacting Council.
  • Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling plan is out for consultation and residents can hear more about the focus on reducing waste and increasing recycling from the kerbside bins and have their say until 28 May.
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Connect and restore at IndigiScapes Eco Markets


Celebrate with Redlands IndigiScapes Centre the natural wonders of Redlands Coast at the environmental centre’s series of Eco Markets, kicking off tomorrow (Saturday 1 May, 2021).

Mayor Karen Williams said the May event – the first of four scheduled for this year – would be held in the centre’s beautiful native botanic gardens and include market stalls featuring sustainable products, upcycled fashion, fresh produce and more.

“There will also be live music, local arts and crafts, books and displays, including permaculture and native beekeeping,” she said.

“The IndigiScapes nursery, cafe and gardens will all be open for the community to come along and connect and restore in nature.

“Redlands Coast, from islands to coastal areas and hinterland, boasts a wonderfully diverse natural environment, with 40 per cent protected green space, and so much to see and do.

“Council’s IndigiScapes is one of those great places where people can immerse in nature and discover more about their own naturally wonderful home.

“You will be able to visit the markets, buy native plants from the nursery, enjoy the walking tracks and native botanic gardens, visit the Discovery Centre and gift shop, and choose from a range of delicious food.

“If you like, you can also pack a picnic basket and rug and relax in the gardens while the children enjoy the nature playground and maze.”

Division 7 Councillor Rowanne McKenzie said the Eco Markets in May would be followed by an Environment and Community Fair on Saturday 5 June, to mark World Environment Day.

“This will be a celebration where people can explore more about global conservation movements and how they can contribute to them with action at home,” Cr McKenzie said.

“The year’s theme is Ecosystem Restoration, which can take many forms, such as growing trees, greening cities, rewilding gardens, changing diets, or cleaning up rivers and coasts.

“With World Oceans Day falling on 8 June, the Environment and Community Fair will include marine environment groups and highlight the impact of single-use plastics on our ocean and marine life, encouraging reduced reliance on plastics leading into Plastic Free July.

“Redlands Coast is an amazing place to live, work and play, and I encourage everyone to come along and play in nature at these IndigiScapes events.”

EVENT DETAILS

FREE ENTRY

WHEN: 8am to noon – Saturday 1 May 2021; Saturday 5 June 2021; Saturday 4 September 2021; Saturday 4 December 2021

WHERE: 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba. Additional parking available via the nursery and My Horizon entry

WHAT: Market stalls, live music, upcycled fashion, fresh produce, native nursery, cafe and more

MORE INFORMATION: indigiscapes.redland.qld.gov.au or 3829 8999

The events will operate under a COVID-safe plan

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Trailblazing drones trial to beat mozzies and protect environment


In a South-East Queensland first, Redland City Council is trialling drones as a tool for managing mosquitoes in hard-to-reach and environmentally sensitive areas within Moreton Bay Marine Park.

Mayor Karen Williams said the six-month trial had exciting potential for Redlands Coast, where mosquitoes are endemic due to its natural environment.

“We are leading the way as one of the first councils in our region to use drones as part of our Mosquito Management Program,” Cr Williams said.

“Of course, safety is our number one concern. The chemicals used in the drone trial are safe for people and their pets, environmentally friendly and only target mosquito larvae.

“They are the same as those used in Council’s regular ground and helicopter treatments.”

“Treatment via drone has proven successful and now it’s hoped the program can be expanded to protect our sensitive environments as well as the wellbeing of Redlands Coast residents.”

From left, Redland City Mayor Karen Williams, Mozzie Taskforce Chairman and Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle, Proagco Director Brendon Hare and Council Pest Management Team Coordinator Russell Manby.

Due to finish at the end of this mosquito breeding season, the focus of the trial has been on Geoff Skinner Wetlands Reserve at Wellington Point; Point Halloran Conservation Area at Victoria Point; German Church Road wetlands at Mt Cotton; and Rocky Passage Road at Redland Bay.

Cr Williams said agricultural digital solutions provider Proagco supplied two sorts of drones for the trial.

“The smaller drones were equipped with many cameras to pinpoint and map mozzie breeding grounds, with two larger ones used to transport and deliver the chemical directly over mosquito breeding sites,” she said.

“After rain events, our high-density hard-to-reach conservation areas that are lush with mangroves and casuarinas typically contain puddles of water that present prime breeding grounds for mosquito larvae.

“These environmentally sensitive areas are often difficult to access and require officers to travel by foot to apply treatments manually by hand, wearing 25kg backpack blowers.

“Access to other areas might also require the use of the Argo and quad bikes.

“Drones are proving much more versatile, with the ability to travel direct to the breeding site to deliver chemical that is target-specific and only toxic to mosquito larvae.

“This method is increasing the efficacy of treatments while also improving safety for Council officers by reducing manual handling, heat stress and fatigue.”

Regional Mosquito Management Group Chairman Cr Paul Golle said the trial showed drones could be used in treating up to 40 per cent of existing mosquito breeding sites currently treated by hand.

“They also have potential to treat sites presently inaccessible by foot or helicopter,” he said.

“Drone supplier Proagco has collaborated to progressively modify their drones as Council officers discovered how the new technology enables them to better deliver mosquito larvicides effectively.

“Key modifications have enabled the drones to deliver granules, sand and pellets and, with the capacity to fly at up to 30m high.

“Using the drone we are now able to treat two hectares of mosquito breeding sites in about 10 minutes.”

Proagco director Brendon Hare said the $50,000 large drones were originally designed to sow seeds and powdered products in China.

“What we have achieved in working with Redlands’ Mosquito Management Program, developing ways to allow Council to use drones for mosquito control in many different and difficult-to-access settings, is leading-edge technology,” Mr Hare said.

 

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Have your say on Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan


Redlands Coast residents can now have their say on Redland City Council’s four-year plan to boost recycling and reduce local waste going to landfill.

Council will open its draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 for four weeks of community consultation from 27 April.

Councillors have also endorsed in principle a longer term draft waste management plan developed by the SEQ Council of Mayors to guide a regional approach to waste management, which will be launched in May.

Mayor Karen Williams said all residents had a vested interest in how Council and its local government neighbours met waste reduction and recycling targets necessitated by significant changes in the waste sector in recent years.

“Better management of our waste and the greater uptake of recycling means more than just helping our environment and progressing to a zero-waste future, it is also critical to minimise extra costs to ratepayers,” Cr Williams said.

“In July 2019 the State Government introduced a waste levy in an attempt to reduce waste being sent to landfill.

“While this levy is currently subsidised by the State Government, we are concerned this subsidy may change in the future, making the investment into improved recycling a better use of community funds.

“Council’s draft plan, developed alongside the broader draft South-East Queensland Waste Management Plan, outlines how we can all work together to better use our existing kerbside waste, recycling and green waste services as efficiently as possible.

“Through it we will work to double the number of households with a green-waste bin for garden organics, as well as halve the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins.

“We also want to ensure everyone knows the importance of using the right bin and reduce the contamination in yellow-lid recycling bins that can undermine residents’ recycling efforts.

“Our aim is for 90 per cent of our community to be correctly recycling 90 per cent of their waste, 90 per cent of the time. This is what it will take to reach Queensland’s recycling target of 70 per cent by 2050, together with other industry action.”

Cr Williams said the draft plan relied on residents working with Council to reduce waste and increase recycling.

“The plan outlines a way we can collectively achieve waste reduction and recycling targets set by the Queensland Government,” she said.

“Community involvement is important to the success of the plan and achieving a collective impact on our waste management and a zero waste future for the Redlands Coast.

“Now that the consultation period has started, I encourage everyone to provide feedback on the priorities and initiatives identified in this draft plan.

“I know how passionate our community is about helping to look after our environment and keeping Redlands Coast naturally wonderful.

“So please take this opportunity to tell us what you think.”

Redland City Council’s draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 includes encouraging the improved use of the existing kerbside services such as:

  1. doubling the number of households with a green waste bin for garden organics
  2. halving the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste bins
  3. reducing contamination (non-recyclable materials) in the yellow-lid recycling
  4. ensuring everyone knows the importance of using the right bin.

Currently almost two-thirds of what goes in Redlands Coast red-lid waste bins could be kept out of landfill, including more than 10,000 tonnes a year of garden organics and 6,000 tonnes of other waste which could be recycled.

Visit Council’s Your Say website https://yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/  to read all about the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025 and have your say by 28 May 2021. As an added incentive, those who complete the online survey will have the chance to enter a competition draw to win one of 10 x$50 IndigiScapes vouchers (terms and conditions apply).

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Nature-based thinking around the future of Birkdale Community Precinct


With Birkdale Community Precinct rich in protected ecology and environmental values, Redland City Council is encouraging people to consider the area’s natural assets as they imagine and share their ideas for future uses of the land.

The precinct sits within an ecological corridor along the lower Tingalpa and Coolnwynpin Creek catchments and links with a broader network of conservation reserves and protected areas, with almost two-thirds of the precinct being protected by an environmental covenant.

Mayor Karen Williams said the 62-hectare site had potential for a huge variety of community uses, providing they were respectful of the land’s ecology and environment.

“The protections mean the precinct’s habitat, wildlife and heritage will be safe and the community keeps the beautiful greenbelt we now see wrapping around the meandering Tingalpa Creek. I want to make it really clear that these areas are preserved for future generations and will be enhanced and connected to make areas of outstanding ecological importance to our wildlife,” Cr Williams said.

“That doesn’t exclude the community from being able to access and enjoy these beautiful areas in the future, as some low-impact ‘tread-lightly’ ideas that are respectful of their environment are possible. The community will always be the custodians of this protected conservation area which covers almost 40 hectares of the precinct, so how can it be best enjoyed perhaps through education and discovery opportunities?

“It brings to mind such endeavours as interactive nature walks, both day and night-time, and small scale, eco-friendly stay options, such as camping, glamping, perhaps even tree-house accommodation that help facilitate citizen science projects.

“These are just a few of the possible uses and we invite the community to help build the future by sharing their ideas for the site with us. The precinct offers wonderful opportunities for us to transform this site into an environmentally and family-friendly conservation and recreational area that we can all be proud of.”

Cr Williams said Council had undertaken extensive environmental and cultural studies and had implemented management plans for the precinct to protect its unique values.

“There is also the opportunity to enhance habitat connections throughout the site and beyond which is really how we can elevate the importance and quality of the ecology on the land beyond just a single patch,” she said.

“Some of the precinct’s areas that fall under a Community Facilities zone have minimal identified environmental values, allowing potential community uses amid the naturally wonderful environment across the precinct.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said one thing COVID-19 had reminded us all of was the importance of people reconnecting – with themselves and family, within nature.

“In my view, the Birkdale Community Precinct site continues to remind us of the lessons that nature has been offering well before and since European arrival,” Cr Bishop said.

“Set within ancient land and cradled in the curves of a beautiful creek, this area offers an amazing opportunity for individuals and families to reframe our appreciation of economy, ecology and land use planning, as we reconnect with bountiful ecosystems within this place.”

Lat27 director Damian Thompson said reconnecting with nature had become even more critical in recent times as we travelled less and focussed more on our own back yards.

“This site presents an incredible opportunity to connect locals and visitors alike with the unique, largely unknown ecological attributes of this stretch of Tingalpa Creek,” he said.

Mr Thompson was one of five urban design and landscape architecture teams who created ideas boards for the precinct based around themes inherent to the site. His theme was Ecology and Environment.

A June 2020 study of the site’s ecology, commissioned by Redland City Council, discovered 219 flora species on the precinct, of which 146 were considered native species, and a total of 38 fauna species.

Future uses for the area will nurture and continue protecting these flora and fauna species.

The existing native vegetation identified in the report included native foods such as brush cherry, berry saltbush, ruby saltbush, native asparagus, kangaroo grass, warrigal greens (New Zealand spinach) and wombat berry.

For more information about Council’s community consultation on your input into possible future uses for Birkdale Community Precinct, visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au – see expert urban designers’ ideas, watch the videos, read the fact sheets, take a virtual tour of the precinct, and have your say.

Two open days when the community will have the rare opportunity to tour the site firsthand are planned for Friday April 16 and Saturday April 17, from 10am to 4pm. Full details on yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

Consultation closes on Tuesday 4 May 2021.

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Ranger Stacey wild about joining Redland City Council team


Redland City Council is excited to welcome Stacey Thomson, better known as Ranger Stacey, to Council’s Environment and Education team this week.

Mayor Karen Williams said Ranger Stacey, former host of the long-running, nature-themed television show Totally Wild, which ended recently, would be based primarily at IndigiScapes at Capalaba.

“We are delighted that Ranger Stacey has brought her wealth of conservation knowledge and experience to our community,” she said.

“She has a passion for inspiring a love of nature and Australian wildlife, and we are thrilled to have her working as part of our Council team.”

Ranger Stacey said working on Redlands Coast for Council was the start of an exciting new chapter for her, championing conservation and inspiring a new generation to connect with nature.

“I’ve been coming to Redlands Coast for recreation since I was a little girl and was married at Cleveland’s Grand View Hotel,” she said.

“I love it here.

“Redlands Coast is a beautiful, diverse environment with so much to offer from the coastal zones and islands to the hinterland.

“This is a very green part of the world with lots of parklands and vast tracts of bushland still in place.

“When the television show ended, I wanted to do something I believed in and where I could lend my skills.

“This is a very exciting new start for me and I’m looking forward to spending more time on Redlands Coast and getting to know the community better.

“The people here really value where they live and I’m looking forward to playing an active part in helping to showcase the many natural wonders that are found here.”

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