Category Archives: Community

Help shape prized Redlands Coast park


Redlands Coast residents can help shape the future of Thorneside’s William Taylor Memorial Sports Field, with those who complete a two-minute survey by 10 September 2021 able to go into the draw to win one of three $100 gift cards.

Mayor Karen Williams said the survey, which opens on Friday 27 August, would help Council better understand what locals, tenant sporting clubs and other park users would like to see at the popular park.

“We know that Redlands Coast residents value their open spaces and will be enjoying the new tennis and cricket facilities which opened at William Taylor in June and are looking forward to the upgraded public toilets, picnic facilities and a bike skills zone, as well as the renewed play space, skate park, BMX/cycling, petanque court and carpark,” Cr Williams said.

“This survey now gives Thorneside locals and other park users, including sporting clubs, the opportunity to influence a sports, natural environment or discovery theme for the new toddler-primary play space, as well as the option to suggest other ideas.

“Similarly, by letting us know what they like about the existing skate park, our growing skating community will help design a facility with features they would like to use.

“Detailed design of the recreation area will start later this year and will consider the survey results together with the site plan already developed in collaboration with the sporting clubs that call William Taylor home.

“The detailed design will be finalised by June 2022, ready for construction when funding becomes available.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said Council was eager to hear from Thorneside locals and other park users, after having recent formal discussion with committee members of the tenant sporting clubs about the proposed improvements.

“The renewed tennis courts and public cricket nets have already brought a new lease of life to this local sport and recreation hub at William Taylor Sports Reserve,” he said.

“Over the years, I have heard requests for upgrades and changes to reflect diverse needs within our local area. Now, council has committed to provide a play space the neighbourhood will enjoy using as well as a revamped skate, scooter, BMX facility that might encourage even more young people to get outdoors and get active within a safe and family friendly environment.

“We will be letterbox-dropping paper copies of the survey to residents around William Taylor as an additional way for those who live nearby to let us know their views. However, the easiest way to complete the survey is online at yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au

“As local councillor, I really urge locals to share your views. After the survey closes on 10 September, it would be great to have received a high number of participants in this consultation activity, as this is what will help ensure an open space that the entire community can enjoy for years to come.”

To complete the two minute survey and enter the draw to win one of three $100 gift cards, and to find out more about the William Taylor Memorial Sports Field Upgrade, visit yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au. Gift card winners will be selected via random draw.

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Super six tourism experiences for long weekend


Naturally wonderful Redlands Coast is having a big weekend in October and the rest of Greater Brisbane is invited.

Redland City Council is rolling out a tourism campaign highlighting great Redlands Coast getaway ideas which are “just up the road yet a world away” for neighbouring communities whose Ekka long weekend was delayed.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was the perfect spot for Greater Brisbane residents to spend the big break from Friday 29 October, with Council working with local tourism operators and businesses to ensure exceptional COVID-safe experiences.

She said island and coastal escapes in the heart of Quandamooka traditional country were a specialty.

“We have an amazing 335km of coastline and, with fast ferry services available to all our islands, it doesn’t take long to immerse yourself in a whole new world, whether it is taking in the stunning beaches, wildlife and rich cultural history of North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), heading for a family beach holiday on Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) or relaxing at the bowls club with the best-ever view on Macleay Island (Jencoomercha),” Cr Williams said.

“While on Minjerribah, it really is worth joining an Aboriginal Cultural Walk with a Quandamooka guide and hearing sacred stories dating back more than 21,000 years.

“For water sports lovers, there are a number of canoe and kayak launching pontoons if you have your own water craft or you can hire a standup paddleboard, canoe or kayak from one of the local waterfront businesses, join a guided tour or sign up for a sailing adventure.

“There’s also a three-day long weekend visitor itinerary to guide you around our tourism treasures.”

Redlands Coast’s thriving food scene offers on-trend bars, micro-breweries and outstanding dining options.

“There’s no doubt you will find something to satisfy everyone’s taste, with the Redlands Coast online food trail directory a great place to start,” Cr Williams said.

“Visitors hoping to reconnect with nature also won’t be disappointed, with plenty of great experiences from guided eco-education tours by Ranger Stacey at Redland City Council’s IndigiScapes Centre, to bayside and hinterland wildlife spotting, and Point Lookout (Mooloomba) boardwalk on Minjerribah from where you can see an incredible array of marine creatures.

“October is also a great time for divers to see the famous annual visitors to Minjerribah’s Manta ray Bommie, while humpback whales continue on their annual migration past Point Lookout (Mulumba) – one of Australia’s best land-based whale-watching destinations.

“Those who prefer more energetic land-based pursuits, Redlands Coast is blessed with some of the region’s best hinterland mountain bike, hiking and horse riding trails, with more than 60km of tracks in the Bayview Conservation Area alone, which is home to koalas, goannas, glossy black-cockatoos, wallabies and powerful owls. There is also almost 240ha of natural conservation bushland at Redlands Track Park, along with the many kilometres of off-road cycling routes across Redlands Coast.”

Redlands Coast offers a range of accommodation options from island waterfront cottages and camping and beachfront resorts on Minjerribah to glamping at Mount Cotton’s (Boolimba) Sirromet Winery and hinterland getaways.

Half a dozen of the best

Redlands Coast’s October long weekend getaway options can be as relaxing or adventurous as you like. Here’s six to get you started.

Enjoy local arts on the Minjerribah arts trail.

  1. Immerse in a Quandamooka experience. Redlands Coast’s traditional heritage and culture is rich indeed and well worth getting to know. Go to quandamookacoast.com.au or YuraTours.com.au for details of guided cultural tours on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). You can also book a Goompi Trail experience with a Quandamooka guide booked through Stradbroke Ferries which explores Dunwich (Goompi) and covers aspects of Aboriginal life such as the fish ring, bush medicines, local food and how artefacts are made. Complete the experience with a visit to Salt Water Murris’ Quandamooka Aboriginal Art Gallery (9am-2pm, Tuesday-Friday, 8.30am-12.30pm weekends); Island Arts Gallery (open every day 9am-2pm); and Delvene Cockatoo-Collins Studio, renowned Quandamooka artist, where you can buy her handmade wares or immerse in Delvene’s personally guided Art Walk and weaving workshop. Talk to the helpful staff at the Redlands Coast Visitor Information Centre, open 7 days from 9am – 4pm, or phone 1300 667 386, about the cultural tours available.

Wales off North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah).

  1. Go land-based whale watching. The humpback whale migration continues in October, so while you are on Straddie, head to picturesque North Gorge Walk at Point Lookout (Mulumba) and see who can spot the first whale (or a heap of other marine creatures). It is rated one of the best land-based whale-watching spots on the Southern Hemisphere.  If you get the taste for it, you can also get fresh seafood straight from the trawler with Rufus King located at Amity Point (Pulan). Travel to and around the island costs about $30 for an adult (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass) and $16 for a child (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass). Alternatively, Stradbroke Ferries are running specials on selected dates that allow you to take a car over at a discounted rate, so check their website.

  1. Experience Island time in no time on Coochie. Taking the short 10-minute ferry ride over to Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) from Victoria Point (Warrer Warrer) really is one of the best quick escapes in South-East Queensland. The sheltered beach is a little piece of paradise with plenty of barbecue and picnic spots, or you can hire a pontoon barbecue boat or head off on the island’s awesome coastal walking trails. There’s a cafe nearby with its own art gallery offering homemade meals and refreshments. Adults can travel on the water taxi for $10 return and children for only $5 return.

The Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area is great for bush walking.

  1. Hit the tracks. Warm up with a hike to Mount Cotton (Jungalpin) summit for views out to Moreton and North Stradbroke Islands (it’s particularly beautiful at sunrise or sunset). You can begin at the Eastern Escarpment Conservation Area, Gate 2, West Mt Cotton Road (opposite Schoeck Road), Mount Cotton – suitable for hikers, mountain bike riders and horseriders. If that isn’t enough, why not walk or cycle the Eddie Santagiuliana Way from Cleveland to Thornlands (wheelchair and pram friendly) or take in the wild surrounds of Redlands Track Park, Bayview Conservation Park, Venman’s National Park, Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area or the Southern Moreton Bay islands.

  1. Connect with nature. IndigiScapes Environmental Education Centre and Café, located in Capalaba (Kapallaba) is an awesome place for families to go for a wander to learn about our naturally wonderful environment, dine at the eco café, overlooking the natural bushlands, with meals inspired from spices of the bush. Kids will have a blast at the discovery centre and outdoor adventure trails. You’ll find all the details at indigiscapes.redland.qld. gov.au

Macleay Island

  1. Go island hopping. Bring your Go Card and catch the water taxi from Redland Bay (Talwalpin) and make your way around the Southern Moreton Bay Islands. Karragarra Island is the first stop, just a 15-minute ride from the terminal, and a great spot for a picnic on the foreshore and maybe a visit to the community gardens. Next is Macleay Island (Jencoomercha) where you can enjoy a meal on the deck after a fun game of barefoot bowls with its stunning views. Just a short stroll from the bowls club, you’ll find the Macleay Island Arts Complex, showcasing proud local artists wares (10am-3pm, Tuesday-Sunday; art classes available). It is then on to Lamb Island (Ngudooroo), a 2km x 1km peaceful island where you can enjoy the local fishing spots and unwind in the natural environment. Then another seven-minute ferry ride to Russell Island (Canaipa) where there are conveniently located cafes, the perfect spot to enjoy views over Canaipa Passage out to North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). On the water taxi, inter-island travel is free so you can do the whole trip for $16 return for an adult and $8 return for children ages 5-14 year, 0–4 years travel for free. Or for a shorter island trip, walk to King Island at Wellington Point.

Find out more about Redlands Coast getaways by calling the Visitor Information Centre on 1300 667 386 or by going to visitredlandscoast.com.au

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Exciting vision for Birkdale Community Precinct


Redland City Council has formally adopted the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document – another step towards creation of an exciting community heart for Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the ideas from the community and presented as a spatial representation in the vision document provided an exciting glimpse at what the 62-hectare site could become.

The vision concept plan.

“This is not the Council’s vision for the site; it is what the community told us they would like to see there,” Cr Williams said.

“To see many of the ideas suggested by the community during our sensationally supported engagement phase actually placed on a map really gives you an impression of how large a scale this vision is and how much can be accommodated on the precinct.

“It shows how the precinct could operate effectively with a multitude of purposes and outcomes and is an exciting glimpse into what our future generations can enjoy.

“It also begins to show the broader picture. Birkdale Community Precinct will have benefits well beyond its boundaries with major public transport upgrades; employment opportunities during its establishment and then ongoing; and as an attractive location for enterprises and ventures across a wide spectrum.”

Cr Williams said the vision placed a range of rural experiences around a restored Willards Farm.

“It could operate in tandem with bush tucker gardens and agritourism opportunities and more,” she said.

“It respects and protects the precinct’s valuable natural habitat while also providing plenty of room for bush walks, wetlands boardwalks, an aquatic centre and adventure play hub, open lawn spaces and eco-camping facilities.

“The vision places the Redland Whitewater Centre – which will be an event venue for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games – in an existing cleared area adjacent to the aquatic centre and with the area possibly having canoe access from Tingalpa Creek. It clearly shows the centre and associated aquatic playground takes up just a small portion of the overall site.

“The heritage-listed former World War II radio receiving station takes pride of place in the centre of a pedestrian spine running through the precinct, offering the possibility of a memorial site as well as World War II artefact displays. This sits next to a First Nations ceremonial space and cultural history centre.”

Cr Williams said the vision showed Birkdale Community Precinct’s potential to be transformed into a world-class precinct that would be a multi-generational showpiece for Redlands Coast.

“It will be a picturesque, vibrant and diverse destination which provides benefits beyond its boundaries in helping to define Redlands Coast,” she said.

“The plan doesn’t represent a completed design that is ready to be built. It is instead an interpretation of what it could look like.

“This document brings together the ideas gathered from the community during an extensive seven-week engagement program and presents them as concepts. It will be used to inform a draft master plan for the precinct for which there will be further extensive community engagement.

“The vision document is structured around the precinct’s significant heritage, cultural and conservation values, all of which will be protected.

“Remember, this was Commonwealth land before Council bought it in December 2019 to save it from being subdivided after the Federal Government had earmarked it for about 400 housing lots.

“To see it on the path to becoming a world-class community asset is such an achievement.”

Cr Williams said this stage in the visioning process had been shaped by a huge and unprecedented response from the Redlands Coast community.

“When the community was invited to help create a shared vision for the site during the engagement program which ran from March to May this year, the response was phenomenal,” she said.

“All of those, literally, thousands of ideas and creative suggestions and discussions and sharing of personal stories, are now coming together to form the heart of this precinct.

“This is a long-term project that delivers on the diverse views our community showed us they had for future use of this unique site.

“The community will continue to have ongoing input into the planning for what is shaping up as potentially one of this city’s finest achievements.”

Precinct Vision highlights:

Adopted by Redland City Council on 18 August, 2021, the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document is an overarching framework to guide decision making and allow individuals, institutions and businesses to establish a dialogue about the prospective future of the precinct. It brings together the multitude of ideas gathered during the engagement process and presents them spatially on the site as concepts.

Environment and ecology

Whether it’s a bush walk on an Aboriginal art trail or wetlands boardwalk, kayaking along Tingalpa Creek, learning about local wildlife and landscape stewardship on an overnight camping trip, or taking in the scenery from a treetop walk – the precinct could deliver a multitude of sustainable ways for visitors to enjoy and experience the landscape. Key elements include: wetlands walk, bush walks, eco-camping and treetop walk.

Agriculture and rural tradition

The legacy of Willards Farm presents a unique opportunity to create a dynamic cluster of agritourism destinations and community assets that celebrate the region’s rural tradition and history. Key elements include: Willards agrifarm experience, flexible farmer’s market space and paddock-to-plate café and dining.

Heritage and history

Birkdale Community Precinct could incorporate the respectful protection, adaptation and reuse of the area’s significant heritage assets through showcasing local First Nations stories and land management practises and celebrating and reusing Willards Farm and the US Army Corps-built World War II radio receiving station. Key elements include: connection to Country, pioneer past and World War II history

Adventure and recreation

The precinct could offer a dynamic and diverse range of adventurous experiences that cater to all ages and abilities, while also establishing a world-class destination for live sport and events – a truly multidimensional destination with something for everybody, keeping visitors coming back for more. Key elements include: Redland Whitewater Centre, aquatic centre, swimming and water play, adventure play hub and flexible events lawns.

Education and discovery

Engaging learning experiences could be embedded throughout the precinct, with opportunities for local stewardship showcasing everything from Traditional Owner land management techniques and wildlife education, renaturalising processes, as well as innovative agricultural research and technologies. Key elements include: bush tucker garden, ag-tech hub and wildlife and landcare centre.

For more information on Birkdale Community Precinct, go to: yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/imagine

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Applications open for Redland City Council Sponsorship Program


Applications are now open for Round 1 of Redland City Council’s annual Sponsorship Program.

Mayor Karen Williams said almost $140,000 was available over two rounds of sponsorship this financial year to support community-based events and initiatives held on Redlands Coast.

“Council sponsorship helps local organisations, community groups and individuals run a diverse range of events, projects and initiatives that directly benefit our community,” she said.

“From food and wine festivals and vintage markets to fireworks displays, fun runs and fishing competitions, we know that events provide immense economic benefits for Redlands Coast and attract visitors from far and wide.

“Council is thrilled to have the opportunity to support our event organisers in delivering some much-needed light relief to our hard-working community while supporting our local economy.

“Sponsorship can take the form of either financial or in-kind support, and the first round of the program is available for activities planned for December 2021 through to November 2022.

“I would encourage all event and activity organisers to consider applying for this support.”

Since 2016, Council has awarded more than $920,922 in Sponsorship and more than $1,844,587 in Community Grant funding. This includes about $259,000 to support local businesses impacted by COVID-19 in 2019-20.

Applications for Round 1 of this year’s Sponsorship Program will be accepted until 13 September 2021 and will support activities and events that provide tangible and measurable benefits to the Redlands community.

There are categories for minor sponsorship (up to $15,000) and major sponsorship (more than $15,000).

Funding opportunities are also available in the first round of the 2021-2022 Community Grants Program which closes on 23 August, with grants up to $10,000 to support local community organisations and individuals to undertake projects for the benefit of the Redlands Coast community.

Applications for Capital Infrastructure Grants of up to $50,000 will open in September, and a second round of both Sponsorship and Community Grants will open in February 2022.

For eligibility criteria and to learn more about how to apply for grants or sponsorship, visit Redland City Council’s website or call 3829 8999.

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Council raises awareness of safe cycling on Redlands Coast


Redland City Council is rolling out an awareness campaign to promote safe cycling across Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the Ride Redlands Coast campaign aligned with commitments in Council’s Corporate Plan 2021-2026 and Redlands Coast Transport Strategy 2020 to deliver positive active transport outcomes across the city.

“Council has also demonstrated its commitment to cycling, and other forms of active travel, through the recent establishment of the Redlands Coast Active Travel Group,” she said.

“Redlands Coast has a great recreational cycling culture with hundreds of kilometres of tracks and pathways.

“Through the Ride Redlands Coast campaign we want to promote cycling as an easy and enjoyable way to travel, exercise and experience some of our many naturally wonderful attractions while promoting a healthy lifestyle.

“We will also be reinforcing safety messages such as the importance of wearing a helmet, using a bell and checking brakes.”

State Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said the Queensland Government was supporting the campaign through their $252 million investment between 2021–22 and 2024–25 to design, build and maintain cycling infrastructure and fund programs to encourage more people to ride bikes.

“We know when people ride more often it makes our transport system more sustainable, helps us maintain a healthy environment and a more active lifestyle,” Mr Bailey said.

“We’re very pleased to be working with local government to encourage more cycling, more often through campaigns like Ride Redlands Coast.”

Redlands Coast Active Travel Group chair and Division 2 Councillor Peter Mitchell said that as well as the citywide promotion, Council would undertake a targeted campaign in Thornlands and Victoria Point to increase awareness of a raised priority crossing near Pinklands Sporting Complex.

“Council initiatives to encourage active travel include improving cycling and pedestrian facilities, and one example is a new type of raised priority crossing which prioritises pathway users,” Cr Mitchell said.

“The crossings are constructed on a raised platform which increases visibility and reduces vehicle speeds, while providing a safe, direct route for both pedestrians and cyclists.

“The result, we hope, is more active travellers, which is why they are ideal in areas where we want people to cycle more.

“The raised priority crossing at Pinklands is the first to be constructed on Redlands Coast but we are expecting them to become more prevalent.”

Division 3 Councillor Paul Golle said the Pinklands crossing was on a key cycling route.

“The crossing is on an access road off busy Cleveland-Redland Bay Road and is a very visible reminder to motorists to slow down and give way to cyclists and other pathway users,” Cr Golle said.

As part of the Ride Redlands Coast campaign, Council is also conducting an online survey to gather data on cycling in the city and opportunities to improve access and safety. The survey is available on Council’s Your Say webpage.

The campaign will be promoted on social media, and the targeted campaign will include a letter box drop and engagement with local schools in close proximity to the new raised priority crossing.

More information, including cycling safety fact sheets and a video, is available on Council’s Your Say site.

The Ride Redlands Coast campaign has been supported through the Queensland Government’s Cycle Network Local Government Grants program.

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Council hosts workshops ahead of annual survey of Glossy Black-Cockatoo


Redland City Council is supporting an annual survey of the vulnerable Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami) on Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council was hosting free workshops next week to help volunteers participating in the bird count.

“This survey is an important part of ongoing efforts to protect one of the smallest and rarest cockatoos in Australia, and we are lucky to have this stunning species reside on Redlands Coast,” she said.

“Most of the Glossy Black-Cockatoo sightings have been on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah).

“However, late last year there were increased sightings in the Scribbly Gums Conservation Area at Alexandra Hills, and chewed orts (evidence of glossies feeding) were found in the same area in June this year.

“The birds feed exclusively on seeds in the cones of She-oak trees and leave a scattering of chewed seeds (orts) beneath them.

“So these She-oak trees are vital for the continued presence of these beautiful cockatoos on Redlands Coast.

“They also require very large hollows to breed in and these are only found in veteran (old growth) trees.”

A Glossy Black-Cockatoo. Image: Marj Kibby

Cr Williams said Redland City Council had been an active partner of the Glossy Black Conservancy since it was officially formed in 2005 and worked with the community by planting future feed tree resources, education and research of ‘glossies’ and their habitat requirements.

The Glossy Black Conservancy is running this year’s bird count on the weekend of 11 and 12 September.

In preparation, Council is hosting a workshop at IndigiScapes on Sunday 15 August and a virtual workshop on Monday 16 August.

“The workshops are a great way to learn how to identify the Glossy Black-Cockatoo, its feed trees and signs of feeding,” Cr Williams said.

“Participants will also be shown how to record an observation and learn the difference between the three species of black cockatoos in south-east Queensland.

“By being involved in the annual survey your sightings of these birds will provide critical information about their distribution which will assist the long-term management of them in the region.”

The Glossy Black-Cockatoo Survey Training Workshop will be held at IndigiScapes from 9-11am on 15 August. Numbers are capped. For more information, including how to register, visit the IndigiScapes website.

The online workshop will be held, via Zoom, on Monday 16 August from 6-8pm. For details email lisa.bailey@redland.qld.gov.au

Glossy Black-Cockatoo sightings can be recorded any time at glossyblack.org.au

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Council services reopening after COVID lockdown lifts and EKKA holiday arrives


Following the State Government’s announcement this morning that the South-East Queensland lockdown will end at 4pm today, most of Redland City Council services will resume on Tuesday 10 August after the Redlands Coast EKKA public holiday tomorrow on Monday 9 August. Limited services will be in operation tomorrow on the public holiday.

In line with the lockdown lifting, our playground and outdoor exercise equipment, skate parks, BMX tracks and public barbecues are no longer off limits to the community. Please be mindful of current State Government gathering limits of up to 10 people gathering in a public space.

Redland Performing Arts Centre will reopen on Tuesday however, for ticketed and seated shows only 50 per cent of the audience will be allowed, in line with restrictions. This may affect some performances and activities over the next two weeks.

Council services will reopen in line with the current State Government restrictions that remain in place for the next two weeks.

However, Council encourages residents to make full use of Council’s online and telephone services where they can.

Face masks and checking in are required.

Council services reopening on EKKA public holiday, Monday 9 August

Redland Animal Shelter will open from 9am to 12pm, and will return to normal operating days and times from Tuesday. Follow Redland Animal Shelter on Facebook.

Community halls and the tennis courts at Wellington Point will reopen to those with pre-existing bookings on Monday, with new bookings being accepted from Tuesday. In line with current gathering restrictions, there will be limits to the number of people allowed in our community halls at one time.

Cleveland Aquatic Centre will reopen from Monday. Visit the Cleveland Aquatic Centre website for opening hours.

Bin collection services and all Recycling and Waste Centre operations, which have continued throughout the lockdown will run as usual.

Council services reopening on Tuesday 10 August
Council services resuming regular operating hours on Tuesday include:
• All Council customer service centres
• Redland Performing Arts Centre (RPAC) box office. RPAC will operate with 50 per cent capacity with seated, ticket allocations. Follow RPAC on Facebook.
• Cleveland and Capalaba Art Galleries (RAG). Follow RAG on Facebook.
• All Council libraries. Follow Redland City Libraries on Facebook.
• IndigiScapes. Follow IndigiScapes on Facebook.
• Visitor Information Centre at Raby Bay Harbour Park.

Out of hours emergencies
For council-related emergencies, please phone 3829 8999.

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Redland City EKKA show holiday goes ahead this Monday 9 August


Redland City Council has asked the State Government to include Redland City in a proposed extra public holiday later this year after a State Government decision left Council with no time to consider changing this year’s Ekka Public Holiday.

Mayor Karen Williams said that, for the second year running, the State Government had failed to give affected local government areas adequate time to consider whether to change their show holiday date, following the unfortunate cancellation of the EKKA due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“Yesterday Council was provided only a few hours to make a decision and, with no General Meeting scheduled, formally agreeing on a change to the gazetted public holiday within the State’s timeframe was practically impossible,” Cr Williams said.

“To change our show holiday, Council would need to vote on a new resolution to override its 2013 decision to set all our future show holidays on the Monday of Brisbane Ekka week.

“It is disappointing that affected Councils in the region didn’t have time to consider bringing their own local government areas in line with Brisbane, which will have its public holiday postponed.

“As a result, some surrounding Councils have opted to stay with their planned show day.”

Mayor Williams said she was still looking for ways to support Redlands Coast residents with a holiday they could fully enjoy as well as the business community with the economic benefits this holiday would usual bring.

“Council has this morning written to the Office of Industrial Relations suggesting the State Government may wish to consider an additional public holiday for the affected 11 Council areas in the current COVID lockdown to coincide with the yet-to-be confirmed new Brisbane Show Holiday,” she said.

“The addition of a public holiday would be a decision for the State Government and I have also requested that they, in conjunction with local State MP’s, consult fully with the community, local business and Council and decide on an appropriate date that provides the most benefit to all.”

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Historic Willards Farm looks to the future within Birkdale Community Precinct


Maintenance work and an updated Conservation Management Plan (Heritage) are underway for the historic heritage-protected Willards Farm as its future place within Birkdale Community Precinct begins to take shape.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said a program of works was being prepared around future restoration priorities for the site, which is one of the oldest surviving farms and residences on Redlands Coast, believed to date back to the 1870s.

“Works were completed recently to help stabilise the structural integrity of the farmhouse’s main supports,” Cr Williams said.

Historic heritage-protected Willards Farm at Birkdale Community Precinct.

“This is such a well-loved and important property in terms of our city’s European history and it will no doubt become a jewel in the crown of Birkdale Community Precinct as we go forward.

“On-site investigations have been completed as part of developing the updated conservation management plan for Willards Farm.

“There also will be maintenance work carried out on some of the farm’s significant trees in coming months.”

Cr Williams said that as well as Willards Farm, Birkdale Community Precinct’s protected heritage areas included the former World War II radio receiving station built in 1943 by the US Army Signals Corp and its associated rhombic array of radio antennas.

“The heritage values of this precinct are incredibly important, genuinely fascinating and will be protected,” Cr Williams said.

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said Willards Farm, aka The Pines, held a special place in both history and the heart of the Birkdale community.

“There are so many heritage values tied up in this place, there are gateways to knowledge and ongoing stories of significance yet to be explored here,” Cr Bishop said.

The original homestead and surrounding buildings, such as the milking shed and creamery, help to anchor the entire Birkdale Community Precinct within its early European and pioneer context.

“The place is of so much value to future generations it cannot be underestimated.

“The structures were built by the Willards using simple bush carpentry techniques made from local timbers felled on site, including white beech, swamp beech, cedar and pine.

“The exact date the homestead was constructed is uncertain but it was likely around 1876 when owners James and Margaret Willard took out a mortgage on the land they had owned and farmed since 1865.”

An early photo of the Willards farmhouse in Birkdale.

Cr Williams said Council bought the property at 302 Old Cleveland Road East, Birkdale, in March 2016 following community concern that the site was subject to a development approval for subdivision into residential allotments.

“Once Willards Farm was saved, Council worked long and hard to negotiate the purchase of the neighbouring 61-hectares of Commonwealth land,” she said.

“The Commonwealth had indicated this land was tagged as surplus. As such, it also was in threat of being subdivided into residential allotments, with the Government suggesting it could accommodate 400 houses.

“Council managed to secure the purchase of the land in December 2019.

“The combined properties now form Birkdale Community Precinct.

“It is such a large property that a large number of uses and facilities can be accommodated without impacting on the precinct’s heritage values.

“Other uses will also bring attention and appreciation to the heritage-listed sites that it contains.”

Cr Williams said a vision document for the precinct was currently being prepared and would be presented to Council shortly.

“The document will include high level, aspirational concepts for Willards Farm and its surrounding land to reflect ideas as suggested by the community during Council’s seven-week community engagement program earlier this year,” she said

Some of the ideas put forward for Willards Farm by the community include ventures such as farmers’ market place, bush food gardens, a café or restaurant, paddock-to-plate dining experiences, and an agrifarm experience demonstrating traditional and contemporary farming methods.

Further community consultation will occur at the master planning stage, Cr Williams said.

For more information on Birkdale Community Precinct go to: yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/imagine

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Council playgrounds, exercise equipment off-limits during lockdown


Redland City Council playground and exercise equipment, skate parks, BMX tracks, public barbecues and tennis courts have joined the list of places off-limits to the public during the current COVID-19 lockdown, that was today extended to 4pm on Sunday 8 August 2021.

The Queensland Government announced today that the lockdown would be extended by another five days in 11 local government areas across south-east Queensland, including Redland City.

Due to the high risk of COVID-19 transmission, and as required by the State Government, residents must not use Council playground or exercise equipment, skate parks, BMX tracks or public barbecues during the lockdown. The Council-operated Wellington Point Tennis Courts on Birkdale Road are also closed to the public.

Council’s essential services will continue to operate as usual, other services are operating online and some have closed for the lockdown.

Council’s NAIDOC Cultural Celebration at Raby Bay Harbour Park that was planned for this Saturday, 7 August has been cancelled. It had already been postponed from an earlier date due to a previous lockdown.

The following Redland City Council services have moved online or are closed to the public for the duration of the lockdown, pending further advice from the Queensland Government:

Council’s Customer Service Centres
Customer Service Centres at Cleveland, Capalaba and Victoria Point will be closed for the duration of the lockdown, but Council’s online and telephone services will continue.

Council’s Customer Contact Centre is available for all phone enquiries on (07) 3829 8999 Monday to Friday, 8am–5pm, excluding public holidays.

Urgent requests that cannot be performed over the telephone or via email can be requested by contacting Council’s customer contact centre to make an appointment.

Libraries
Redland Libraries are closed but online services will continue, including e-books, e-audio books, e-magazines, music, movies and children’s stories.

For those with children at home, you might like to make use of the Libraries online story time each morning at 9.30am.

Return chutes are closed, with loan and hold periods extended.  No late fees will be incurred.  To access digital library services, visit our website or download the app from the App Store or Play Store.

Art Galleries
Council’s Art Galleries are closed for the duration of the lockdown.

RPAC

Redland Performing Arts Centre is closed for the duration of the lockdown. All scheduled performances and workshops have been postponed.  See RPAC website www.rpac.com.au for latest performance updates.

IndigiScapes Centre
Closed.

Visitor Information Centre
While the Visitor Information Centre at Raby Bay is closed, information is still available by phone on 1300 667 386; or visit the Redlands Coast website.

Redland Animal Shelter
The gates to Redland Animal Shelter are closed, with onsite staff available for appointments and emergency drop-offs only.

Community halls
Indoor venues, including community halls, are closed.

Public swimming pools
Cleveland Aquatic Centre is closed. Bay Islands Aquatic Centre is already closed for winter.

RecycleWorld
RecycleWorld at Redland Bay Recycling and Waste Centre is closed.

Recycling and Waste Centres

While Council’s Recycling and Waste Centres remain open, Council urges residents to avoid generating unnecessary waste and avoid visiting the facilities unless absolutely necessary. Physical distancing, wearing a face mask, and safety requirements apply.

For the latest health information, visit the Queensland Health website.

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