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Record $327m budget investment in Redlands Coast


Restarting Redlands Coast is at the heart of Council’s record $327 million COVID-affected budget for 2020-21 which provides a $3 million safety net for those most impacted by the pandemic.

The budget includes an expanded $80 million capital investment in the city aimed at generating and preserving local jobs and adding to and sustaining vital community infrastructure and services.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said it was expected Council’s finances would take a multi-million-dollar hit from COVID, including $3 million in COVID recovery funding that had been allocated to help the city recover from the pandemic.

“Right now we need money spent in our city and, with Council being one of Redland Coast’s largest employers, we are taking up the challenge by ensuring local money creates local jobs,” Cr Williams said.

“Council has been diligent in maintaining low levels of debt and a strong balance sheet over the years in preparation for a rainy day and the rain has arrived, so with local businesses struggling we are going to spend local to keep locals employed.

“A significant part of this record spend is thanks to the strong financial reserves that we built for a situation such as this.

“We are also topping up our COVID recovery fund by a further $1 million, providing a total of $3 million safety net to be used by those most impacted by the pandemic.

“While some Councils have chosen to spread rate relief broadly, we have adopted a deliberate strategy of supporting those who need it most by keeping money aside to provide relief when that need is better understood,” Cr Williams said.

“We know the full impacts of the COVID pandemic won’t be known until later this year when support like the Federal Government’s Job Keeper program have ended and this funding will allow us to do that.

“This may be through rates relief, business support or grants to the community; we will keep an eye on the impacts and have that money on hand to respond when and where it is needed most.”

Cr Williams said Council would absorb as much of the COVID impacts as possible, without passing on the impact to residents.

“We will do this by adopting an operating deficit budget and keeping the increase in general rates revenue to 2.99 percent taking in all rating categories – or about 62 cents a week for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied household, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges.

“The extra money collected in rates through this year’s increase will contribute towards further COVID-19 recovery measures to help areas hardest hit by the pandemic response.

“We have also reduced other charges, with the environment separate charge down 4.7 percent and the landfill remediate charge down almost 26 percent.”

Cr Williams said as part of its COVID response Council had strengthened its focus on spending locally to help stimulate the economy.

“It is about getting people out an about again, getting the economy moving, supporting residents, backing businesses, restoring the climate for local employment and creating opportunity.

“It has allowed us to offer total pensioner rates and utilities rebates of almost $3.5 million, with rates rebates of $335 a year for a full pensioner or $167.50 for a part-pensioner.”

Cr Williams said it was disappointing the State Government had increased bulk water costs by a further 6.4 per cent, meaning the city’s total bulk water costs were now $43.4 million.

“This increase is on top of hefty increases over the last three years and comes despite us asking the State to hold bulk water costs to help residents respond to the COVID pandemic.

“To put this in perspective, the city’s bulk water bill is more than half of what we will spend in our capital expenditure program to provide vital community infrastructure.

“Despite this increase Council has kept its retail water consumption increase to just 2.13 percent.”

The 2020-21 budget at a glance:

  • Record $327 million investment in Redlands Coast.
  • An increase in general rates revenue of 2.99 percent taking in all rating categories – or about 62 cents a week for a typical category 1a, owner-occupied household, excluding separate charges, utilities and State Government charges.
  • Capital expenditure of almost $80 million.
  • The State Government’s bulk water charge, over which Council has no control, increases by about $36 for the average ratepayer to fund a total cost of almost $43.4 million this year.
  • Environment separate charge down 4.7 percent and the landfill remediation charge down almost 26 percent – a reduction of $16 on last year for both charges.
  • Council’s retail water consumption charge up by about 2.13 percent.
  • Total pensioner rebates rises to almost $3 million, with rates rebates of $335 a year for a full pensioner or $167.50 for a part-pensioner and other utility charge remissions and rebates totaling $467,000.

Capital expenditure program at a glance:

  • $30 million for transport, roads and traffic projects.
  • $3.2 million for other infrastructure projects.
  • $10.2 million for marine and foreshore projects, including canal and breakwater works.
  • $12.7 million for water, waste and wastewater projects.
  • $13.8 million for parks, open space and conservation.
  • $2 million for community and cultural development.

Go to our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for full budget information.

Investment keeps Redlands Coast naturally wonderful


Redland City Council will spend more than $31 million enhancing and maintaining the city’s naturally wonderful parks, conservation areas and sports areas in 2020-21.

It builds on a multi-million-dollar program of park and playground upgrades across the city in recent years and follows the acquisition of key strategic land for community use, including the former Commonwealth land at Birkdale, historic Willard’s Farm, the Redlands Coast Regional Sport and Recreation Precinct at Mt Cotton and the former Department of Primary Industries land at Alexandra Hills.

Mayor Karen Williams said the Redland City budget, delivered today, includes $13.8 million for improving popular community parks and sports fields alone.

“There is $1.6 million for the Hanover Drive Park upgrade at Alexandra Hills, $1.3 million for
Apex Park at Wellington Point, $1.1 million for Headland Park at Point Lookout and close to another $1 million for the next stage of Thornlands Community Park,” Cr Williams said.

“We have also seen substantial works either completed or underway in Raby Esplanade Park and at Pt Lookout Oval.

“These are just some of the parks across the city to benefit from major makeovers, as we know Redlanders love their outdoors spaces and we want them to be the best they can be.

“Simply maintaining our parks – mowing and cleaning to keep them in tip top shape and safe – will take the total investment to $30.2 million in 2020-21, while fire mitigation alone costs almost $2 million.”

Cr Williams said she was excited by the potential of the former Commonwealth land at 362-388 Old Cleveland Road East, Birkdale, which was acquired last December.

“Council has backed heritage protection for key features of the site, including the former US Army Radio Receiving Station used in World War II,” she said.

“We worked hard over several years to purchase this land to ensure it becomes a great community asset for Redlands Coast.”

Cr Williams said the commitment in this year’s Budget followed more than $3.5 million in park upgrades set to open in the coming week.

“I know Redlanders love their parks and they will have a whole lot more reason to love them with upgraded parks including Thornlands Community Park, which opens this Saturday; Raby Esplanade Park in Ormiston that opens mid next week; and Apex Park at Wellington Point,” Cr Williams said.

“As part of this year’s Budget we will continue that investment, providing plenty of exciting new parks for local families to enjoy.”

Cr Williams said Council was also committed to supporting sports groups, with major renewal projects planned for Thorneside’s William Taylor Memorial Sportsfield and Redland Bay’s Charlie Buckler Sportsfield.

“We also have earmarked $612,000 to progress the Redlands Coast Regional Sport and Recreation Precinct proposal for Heinemann Road, Mount Cotton,” Cr Williams said.

“The masterplan for this new multi-million-dollar regional sport and recreation precinct has been approved, with the project implemented in stages to provide exciting new sporting facilities.

“With our sports group particularly hard hit by measures to keep COVID-19 at bay, we have already moved quickly to provide them with access to a $50,000 operational funding pool from last year’s budget to help them continue supporting the local community.

“Council is also continuing to work with any clubs suffering financial hardship to ensure they are supported through COVID-19.”


Major parks and sportsground projects

Hanover Drive Park upgrade, Alexandra Hills, $1.6 million

Apex Park renewal, Wellington Point $1.3 million

Headland Park upgrade, Point Lookout $1.1 million

Thornlands Community Park stage 2B $996,000

William Taylor Memorial Sportsfield renewal, Thorneside $827,000

Charlie Buckler Sportsfield carpark renewal and expansion $800,000

Raby Esplanade Park stage 2 $777,000

Redlands Coast Regional Sport and Recreation Precinct $612,000

Go to our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for full budget information.

Redlands Coast island infrastructure boost


Redlands Coast island communities will benefit from more than $11.1 million in major infrastructure and roads spending in the 2020-21 Redland City Council budget.

Mayor Karen Williams said the allocations to projects across the Southern Moreton Bay, North Stradbroke and Coochiemudlo islands underscored Council commitment to improving island infrastructure.

“And we hope this is just the start of the post-COVID investment, with Council continue to push hard for state and federal government funding assistance to bring forward shovel-ready projects for island communities,” Cr Williams said.

“We see projects such as the Glendale Road emergency access road on Russell Island and a range of footpath projects and road improvements as vital to the islands’ futures.”

Council’s 2021 budget, adopted today, includes multi-million-dollar investments in the Southern Moreton Bay Islands as part of a total of a $21.6 million to be spent directly on caring for Redlands Coast island communities – up $1.7 million on last financial year.

“Big ticket projects such as the Russell Island pontoon upgrade, which will cost $3.5 million this financial year, the Weinam Creek car park, which will cost $3.4 million, and another $1.5 million for the islands’ Green Seal program will help to significantly improve conditions for islanders,” Cr Williams said.

“These three key projects are critical to improving access to and around the Southern Moreton Bay islands, with the Russell Island pontoon the start of major marine transport infrastructure renewal program which will now to be accelerated to include upgrades to the jetties, gangways and pontoons at Macleay, Lamb and Karragarra islands over three years.

“One of Redlands Coast’s largest-ever marine projects, this partnership with the Department of Transport and Main Roads will have significant transport, tourism and recreational benefits for the region.

“Another $795,000 will be spent on the Canaipa Point Drive off-road footpath on Russell Island, with $259,000 allocated to upgrade Macleay Island Community Park.

“Island waiting sheds and bus shelters will be upgraded at a cost of $404,000.”

Other major island projects include the upgrade of Point Lookout’s Headland Park on North Stradbroke Island ($1.1 million) and park and streetscape asset renewal on Coochiemudlo Island ($270,000).

Go to our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for full budget information.

Massive boost to make it easier to get around Redlands Coast


More than half of Redland City Council’s projected record capital spend for 2020-21 will go towards transport and traffic solutions, with a dozen big-ticket projects and programs alone costing more than $30 million.

The capital outlay in today’s budget also has a strong focus on active transport options, with more than $5.8 million directed at footpaths and cycleways alone to make it easier for our community to leave the car at home and get on their bikes or head out for walks.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council would continue to work with the state and federal governments to bring forward further funding for a multi-million-dollar catalogue of other shovel-ready road and transport infrastructure projects.

“The $80 million in budgeted capital expenditure is expected to hit a record more than $90 million once carry-over funds and anticipated state and federal assistance is factored in,” Cr Williams said.

“More than $9 million will be injected into the city’s Road Renewal Program, with $1.8 million going to Regional Road Alliance Program projects and another $1.7 million to the Roads to Recovery Program.

“Another $1.5 million will go towards our bus shelter and seat renewal program and $525,000 for the Cleveland Rail bus station. We want to encourage more residents to use public transport than just have machines laying bitumen.

“Our island communities will benefit from the start of a $28.6 million two-year project to upgrade the jetties, gangways and pontoons at Russell, Macleay, Lamb and Karragarra islands, with $3.5 million for the Russell island project.

“At Weinam Creek, the gateway to the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, we have dedicated $3.4 million for the carpark development, and we have committed another $1.5 million to the sealing of island roads.

“All this is not only vital to our island residents but also to the development of a sustainable tourism industry to support local jobs creation.”

Cr Williams said Redlands Coast’s great attraction – its waterways and foreshores – came with a substantial cost.

“With more than 335km of coastline, our operating maintenance costs for marine infrastructure, including boat ramps and jetties, foreshore work and canals will total $8.5 million over and above the $10.2 million earmarked for capital works this financial year,” she said.

Cr Williams said Council was also seeking vital infrastructure commitments from the State Government under its Works for Queensland program and the Federal Government under its Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program and Financial Assistance Grants to add impetus to its infrastructure investment.

“We already have 64 projects worth almost $83 million that are shovel-ready and which, if funded, will support jobs growth and deliver improvements for our community,” Cr Williams said.

“These include community disaster resilience and infrastructure improvements worth
$10.4 million for North Stradbroke Island and $8.6 million for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, communities which have been particularly hard hit.

“It also includes millions of dollars’ worth of upgrades to the Redlands Coast transport network, including 6.2km of footpaths, 26km of resurfacing mainland roads and 3.7km of green seal for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands in the next financial year alone to help residents and visitors move around the city faster and safer.”

Major road, traffic and transport projects and programs

Road Renewal Program $9 million

Russell Island pontoon upgrade $3.5 million

Raby Bay revetment walls and groynes $3.7 million

Weinam Creek development carpark $3.4 million

Wellington Street and Panorama Drive road upgrade $3.3 million

Southern Redland Bay boat ramp $1.8 million

Regional Road Alliance Program $1.8 million

Roads to Recovery Program $1.7 million

Southern Moreton Bay Green Seal program $1.5 million

Bus shelter and seat renewal program $1.5 million

Canaipa Point Drive off-road footpath (Oasis Drive – Keats Street) Russell Island $795,000

Kinross Road upgrade, Thornlands $700,000

Main Road, Wellington Point, footpath and retaining wall upgrade $650,000

Cleveland Rail bus station $525,000

Moreton Bay Cycleway, Victoria Point (School Road – Pt O’Halloran Road) $500,000

Go to our website at redland.qld.gov.au/budget for full budget information.

Councillors and senior officers forgo pay rise


Redland City Councillors have forgone a pay rise at the Special Budget Meeting today, saving the City $25,137.

Mayor Karen Williams said Councillors unanimously voted to not accept the remuneration set out for Councillors by the Local Government Remuneration Commission for the 2020/21 financial year.

“Considering the hardship being experience by some of our residents and business community, we could not in good conscience accept a pay rise,” she said.

Cr Williams said the decision by Councillors had been further supported by Council’s senior and executive officers who had also proactively agreed to not accept a pay increase.

“The combined impact of Councillors and Council’s 22 senior officers not accepting a pay increase will save residents about $150,000, which in the current economic environment will be welcome news for the community,” she said.

“Council has worked hard to deliver stimulus packages to ease the burden of locals where possible.

“While our salary savings may not seem a lot in the grand scheme of things, it is a statement of our solidarity with the Redlands Coast community.”

Redland City seeks State freeze on charges


Redland City Council has urged the State Government to freeze its charges to Council for bulk water and business waste so the savings can be passed on to the local community.

Mayor Karen Williams said maintaining the charges at 2019-20 levels would help to ease the burden on residents and businesses as Council managed the city’s emergence from the impacts of COVID-19.

“It would allow Council to deliver this month’s recovery budget based on the lowest and most accurate water and waste costs; supporting us in our efforts to reboot the local economy and provide the services residents tell us they want while helping those adversely impacted by COVID-19,” Cr Williams said.

“A freeze on charges outside of our control – such as what the State charges Council for commercial waste going to landfill and especially for bulk water, considering the hefty increases imposed over the past several years – would significantly assist us to do that.

“Bulk water costs and the commercial waste levy are passed on to users and the saving from a freeze would be significant. For bulk water alone, the published price for 1 July 2020 suggests it would be around $36 a year for average users.

“These cost increases have a budget impact and Council wants to ensure that every cent at our disposal is available for supporting the community by bringing forward the infrastructure projects that will help support the local economy and local jobs.”

She said Council’s 2020-21 budget was due to be delivered on Thursday 25 June despite the State Budget being postponed.

“We fully appreciate the State Government’s need to suspend its budget because it is simply not sensible to produce economic forecasts in these unprecedented times but Council, as the direct provider of essential community services, must push ahead with its budget and get Redlands Coast moving again,” Cr Williams said.

Cr Williams said Council was also seeking vital infrastructure commitments from the State Government under its Works for Queensland program and the Federal Government under its Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program and Financial Assistance Grants.

“We already have 64 projects worth $82.9 million that are shovel-ready and which, if funded, will support jobs growth and deliver improvements for our community,” Cr Williams said.

“These include community disaster resilience and infrastructure improvements worth
$10.4 million for North Stradbroke Island and $8.6 million for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, communities which have been particularly hard hit.

“It also includes millions of dollars’ worth of upgrades to the Redlands Coast transport network, including 6.2km of footpaths, 26km of resurfacing mainland roads and 3.7km of green seal for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands in the next financial year alone to help residents and visitors move around the city faster and safer.

“These job packages, along with a freeze on charges outside of Council’s control, can provide immediate relief and create a positive ripple effect across the community.

“We are, indeed, all in this together and I look forward to the State and Federal governments’ support for our plans.”

For details of Council’s recovery plans and assistance, go to the COVID-19 Business and Community page at redland.qld.gov.au

Enjoy safely all that Redlands Coast has to offer


There’s a lot to do at Redlands Coast as restrictions ease and we head into the cooler months that are perfect for hiking, cycling and exploring.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said that with people able to travel up to 150km from tomorrow, Saturday 16 May 2020, there were  many naturally wonderful hidden treasures and little adventures to explore on Redlands Coast.

“Please remember to exercise social distancing and buy local where you can,” Cr Williams said.

So what will it be for you this weekend?

Redlands Coast has everything from hiking in the bush at Venman Bushland National Park at Mt Cotton, to the all-abilities playground at Capalaba Regional Park to the King Island walk at Wellington Point Recreation Reserve.

Mountain bikers can get an adrenalin rush on the tracks at Redlands Track Park at Cleveland while all cyclists can enjoy the Moreton Bay Cycleway from Thorneside through Wellington Point and Cleveland to Victoria Point and Redland Bay.

You can also get out on our waterways kayaking, windsurfing, paddle boarding or boating, with restrictions removed from Saturday 16 May 2020 for boating around North Stradbroke Island.

All Redlands Coast Islands are also open for day trippers, with restrictions on North Stradbroke Island lifted on Saturday 16 May 2020.

Venman Bushland National Park

West Mount Cotton Road, Mount Cotton (Jungalpin/Tungipin)

Within the beautiful hinterland of Mount Cotton you’ll discover this reserve, with a variety of walking tracks amongst the forest of eucalypt and melaleuca trees. You may even be lucky and spot a koala so keep an eye out! The reserve also acts as a haven for many other native animals including greater gliders, powerful owls and red-necked wallabies, so it is the perfect place to explore.

Raby Bay Foreshore Park

Masthead Drive, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

Raby Bay Foreshore Park boasts sprawling parklands with sandy beaches, a playground and scenic walking and bike paths. It’s a great place to take the family to cool off, enjoy a picnic and relax overlooking the bay. The calm waters are suitable for swimming and you can hire a kayak or stand-up paddle board right on the shore. Coffee, drinks and snacks are available from the coffee trailer. Don’t forget your furry friends. The park is dog-friendly, with a popular designated off-leash beach area.

Wellington Point Recreation Reserve

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

Wind surfing, stand up paddle boarding, kayaking, boating and coastal fishing are just some of the water activities that entice people from far and wide to the Wellington Point peninsula.

Surrounded by coast on three sides, Wellington Point Reserve is popular for picnics, launching a boat into Moreton Bay, and, at low tide, walking to King Island – home to an abundance of coastal wildlife.

Scattered with historic Moreton Bay Fig Trees, with a sandy beach, wooden jetty and brilliants, it is an Instagrammers delight.

Children love the established playgrounds that weave among the shade of Moreton Bay fig trees while the adjacent café and takeaway store offers a great menu and superb view.

King Island Walk

Main Road, Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen)

‘Walking on water’ across the spectacular low-tide sand bridge from Wellington Point to King Island is a Redlands Coast signature experience and one of the most unique walks in South-east Queensland.

A stunning sand causeway emerges from beneath the Moreton Bay waters between the Wellington Point (Cullen Cullen) mainland and the tiny, uninhabited King Island at low-tide, forming a natural bridge for walkers.

It’s a 2km return walk – great for kids who can paddle along the way and spot birds and crabs and you can take your dog (on leash) on week days too.

Make sure you check tide times before you head out too – it’s a strictly low-tide affair.

Put this one on your weekend bucket list for some time soon!

Cleveland Point Recreation Reserve

Shore St West, Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie)

With magnificent Moreton Bay on three sides, Cleveland Point is one of the most iconic, must-visit sites on Redlands Coast.

Cleveland Point is family-friendly with a park, children’s playground, shaded picnic areas and toilets, plus a picturesque pathway around the point for leisurely strolls and cycles – it has a significant link to the city’s past too with the historic Cleveland Point Lighthouse, a Redlands Coast and South-east Queensland icon.

There are plenty of reasons to stop and stay a while at the Cleveland Point Reserve too. Aside from the picturesque location and mesmerising views, the fish and chippery serves up great seafood.

Moreton Bay Cycleway

Redlands Coast

Start at Thorneside or at the other end at Redland Bay and cycle through Redlands Coast’s naturally wonderful villages taking in taking in the unique coastline and mangrove vegetation.

Redlands Track Park

Cleveland (Nandeebie/Indillie) and Alexandra Hills

Looking to discover a new coast this weekend? You can in Redlands Coast. The Redlands Track Park is a multi-use trail for mountain biking, walking and cycling. You may even spot a wallaby or two in the Scribbly Gum Conservation area. Add some excitement to your day by exploring the Scorpion Rock, the Hammer, and the Upper and Lower Magic trails.

IndigiScapes Centre

Runnymede Road, Capalaba (Kapallaba)

Immerse yourself in nature at Redlands Coast’s environmental education centre. Whilst the IndigiScapes building and café might be closed, you can still make the most of the tracks and trails that wind their way through the native bushland that surrounds the centre. Wander the paths that lead you through unspoilt greenery and follow the banks of Coolnwynpin Creek, or stroll the native botanical gardens and get inspiration for your own backyard. There is plenty of space for you to you pull up a picnic, and a playground for those looking to burn some energy! Keep an eye out for the local wildlife that like to call the area home – if you’re lucky you might spot swamp wallabies, lizards and an array of native birds.

For more places to discover on Redlands Coast visit visitredlandscoast.com.au.

Don’t waste our naturally wonderful parks and foreshores


Redland City Council is urging residents and visitors to help keep Redlands Coast naturally wonderful at this time when bulky takeaway food containers and disposable coffee cups are more popular than ever… even in our bins!

There has been a significant influx of people enjoying our parks and foreshores – and combined with an increase in takeaway, rather than eat-in dining – there is additional demand on our bins from these bulky takeaway items.

While Council has increased bin collections at our mainland parks and foreshores, including two daily collections on weekends, and is planning on additional collections on week days from next week, you can help by:

  • Crushing and compacting food containers and coffee cups before putting them in public place bin
  • If the bins are full or none are available, take your waste home to either be recycled or placed in your household bin.

Straddie reopening announcement leaves little notice for businesses to prepare


Redland City Mayor Karen Williams would have liked more notice to be given to North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) businesses and residents to prepare for the reopening of the island from tomorrow (Saturday 16 May 2020).

The State Government announced today (Friday 15 May 2020) that the island would be open for business from midnight tonight after being locked down under a special restricted access directive since 26 March 2020.

Cr Williams, the Chair of the Redland Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG), said that a longer lead time to reopening the island to tourists would have been preferable to ensure business were ready for the expected increase of visitors.

“The LDMG requested a staged approach to reopening the island to tourists and for businesses to be given prior notice to prepare,” Cr Williams said.

“We asked for those with holiday homes allowed to access the island in the first stage, followed by tourists in the second stage, to help manage crowds and give businesses time to re-establish themselves.

“Ferry companies have reduced the number of vessels they are operating and their staff have taken leave – they need time to return their services to normal.

“Our other businesses also need to ensure they have enough staff – many of whom left the island when businesses closed.

“Businesses also need time to restock basic items – much of which comes from the mainland, and requires transporting to the island.”

Cr Williams said while the island needed an economic boost, she asked people to remain patient and use common sense.

“We want people to love visiting the island, but with less than 24 hours’ notice not all businesses will be open so people need to take that into account and call ahead before making the journey to the island,” she said.

“People also need to continue practicing social distancing and good hygiene because there are vulnerable residents on the island who need to be respected and protected.”

Redlands Coast islands have topped the list in Queensland for employment vulnerability resulting from COVID-19, according to research from the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE) at the University of Newcastle.

“This data reinforces the need for Redlands Coast islands to be recognised as regional communities in order to be able to access regional support funding from other levels of government and help with their recovery post COVID-19,” Cr Williams said.

“With sand mining ceasing on North Stradbroke Island last year it was always going to be difficult but now there will be an even greater need to rebuild the tourism economy the State Government predicted would fill the mining void.

“Some businesses that have closed on the island will really struggle to reopen soon, if at all.”

Redland City Councillor Peter Mitchell (Division 2, which includes North Stradbroke Island) said North Stradbroke Island businesses had said they needed assistance to market the island once reopened.

“Straddie needs to be ready to market itself competitively as a holiday destination domestically when it is up and running,” he said.

“COVID-19 and the cessation of mining last year through a State Government decision have been a double whammy – decimating jobs, businesses and livelihoods.”

Park facilities, libraries and other Council services to reopen under eased restrictions


As COVID-19 restrictions begin to ease across Queensland, Redland City Council is preparing to reopen its libraries, park facilities, animal shelter and community halls from this weekend.

Mayor Karen Williams said Council appreciated the restrictions have been challenging and thanked community members for their work in helping to slow the spread of COVID-19.

“These are difficult times that none of us have lived through before, yet the Redlands Coast community’s positive response to this rapidly changing situation has helped keep the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 low,” she said.

“As restrictions are steadily lifted, it is important we all continue with physical distancing, regular handwashing, and cough and sneeze hygiene; and to stay at home if we are unwell.

“I’m pleased that we can all soon enjoy being out and about more, but keeping up the practices we’ve learned over recent months is vital to also keeping the spread of this virus slow and continue saving lives.”

Reopening from this weekend is the following, with physical distancing (1.5m), gathering rules, and hygiene measures continuing to apply:

Park facilities

Parks, playground equipment, skate parks, outdoor exercise equipment, basketball hoops and picnic settings will be open from Saturday 16 May 2020.

Under the State Government’s guidelines for easing Queensland restrictions, gatherings of up to 10 people will be permitted in outdoor, non-contact activity.

With almost 120 public barbecues across Redlands Coast, these will be turned on progressively over coming weeks as electrical safety testing is completed.

This is expected to take at least two weeks, which means that not all public barbecues will be available for immediate use.

Mainland Libraries

Council’s mainland libraries, at Cleveland, Capalaba and Victoria Point, will reopen from Saturday 16 May 2020, with physical distancing, gathering rules and hygiene measures applying.

Library hours are Saturdays 9am to 4pm; Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm.

A maximum of 10 people will be permitted in each library at any one time.

Due to the State Government’s guidelines on the number of people allowed onsite, the libraries will be open for borrowing purposes only, not for computer use, meetings, or reading books or newspapers.

The libraries will not be open during the evenings at this time.

Council’s home library service has also restarted for people who are unable to leave their homes due to illness or disability, and for full time carers.

Online library services are continuing and you can plan your visit to the library by checking the online catalogue and placing a hold on a book to collect at a branch.

The mobile library will also recommence its usual service on Monday 18 May 2020.

Island Libraries

Russell Island library will reopen on Saturday 16 May 2020 during its usual hours, with physical distancing, gathering rules and hygiene measures applying.

Dunwich Library will reopen on Saturday 16 May 2020, with physical distancing, gathering rules and hygiene measures applying. It will be open during its normal hours on Saturdays and Thursdays, but will temporarily remain closed during its normal Tuesday hours.

Point Lookout will reopen on Tuesday 19 May 2020, and Amity Point Library will reopen at a later date, to be advised.

The number of people permitted in these libraries at one time will be based on library size.

Animal Shelter

Council’s Animal Shelter at 265 South Street, Cleveland will reopen from Saturday 16 May 2020, with physical distancing, gathering rules and hygiene measures also applying.

The shelter’s opening hours are 9am to noon Saturday and Sunday; 8.30am to 4.30pm Monday to Friday.

Community halls

Council’s mainland and island community halls are open for bookings from Saturday 16 May 2020, with physical distancing, gathering rules and hygiene measures applying.

Dog off leash areas

Redlands Coast’s fenced and gated dog off leash areas reopened on Friday 8 May 2020.