Monthly Archives: August 2021

Take your disposable face masks to IndigiScapes for recycling


Redlands IndigiScapes Centre has extended its specialist recycling station to trial a TerraCycle Face Mask Zero Waste Box to recycle single-use face masks on behalf of the Redlands Coast community.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the move came after concerns were raised about the additional litter and burden on landfill resulting from all the disposable masks being worn throughout the pandemic.

“The fact that disposable face masks are not accepted in our kerbside recycling hasn’t presented a problem before, but we find ourselves in changing times,” Cr Williams said.

“As Council’s environmental education hub, IndigiScapes, already houses a recycling station for items such as CDs, VHS, toothbrushes and toothpaste and x-rays; it is the ideal location to trial mask disposal as well.

“Now residents can drop all types of single-use face masks in the TerraCycle box at the Centre, which provides a sustainable and convenient disposal solution.

“When full, the box will be returned to TerraCycle, where the waste will be quarantined for at least three months.

“The contents of the box will then be manually sorted and shredded. The metal from the nose clips is smelted and the plastic is melted down into low-grade plastic pellets. The recycled pellet material is then used by third parties to manufacture a variety of new products including outdoor furniture, park benches and decking.”

Councillor for Division 7 Rowanne McKenzie said that Council encouraged everyone to follow the Queensland Health guidelines on safe disposals of masks.

“Whilst the box is lined with a plastic bag so no one can come into contact with the waste, Queensland Health guidelines require face masks to be placed in a sealed bag prior to disposal,” she said.

“Only non-woven disposable plastic-based face masks can be placed in the mask disposal box at IndigiScapes, including 3-ply surgical, dust masks, KN95, and N95 masks.

“Do not bring in cloth masks or other types of protective gear like gloves, hair nets, or lab coats and garments.

“The mask disposal box is situated in the foyer of IndigiScapes and accessible during the centre’s opening hours, 8am-4pm, seven days per week.

“Why not visit the native nursery, wander through the native botanic gardens, go for a bushwalk or drop into the café while you’re there.

“It’s a naturally wonderful experience.”

Redlands IndigiScapes Centre is located at 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba.

Visit redland.qld.gov.au/waste for more information about waste and recycling and indigiscapes.redland.qld.gov.au to find out what IndigiScapes has to offer.

To learn more about TerraCycle and its programs visit terracycle.com.au.

Super six tourism experiences for long weekend


Naturally wonderful Redlands Coast is having a big weekend in October and the rest of Greater Brisbane is invited.

Redland City Council is rolling out a tourism campaign highlighting great Redlands Coast getaway ideas which are “just up the road yet a world away” for neighbouring communities whose Ekka long weekend was delayed.

Mayor Karen Williams said Redlands Coast was the perfect spot for Greater Brisbane residents to spend the big break from Friday 29 October, with Council working with local tourism operators and businesses to ensure exceptional COVID-safe experiences.

She said island and coastal escapes in the heart of Quandamooka traditional country were a specialty.

“We have an amazing 335km of coastline and, with fast ferry services available to all our islands, it doesn’t take long to immerse yourself in a whole new world, whether it is taking in the stunning beaches, wildlife and rich cultural history of North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), heading for a family beach holiday on Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) or relaxing at the bowls club with the best-ever view on Macleay Island (Jencoomercha),” Cr Williams said.

“While on Minjerribah, it really is worth joining an Aboriginal Cultural Walk with a Quandamooka guide and hearing sacred stories dating back more than 21,000 years.

“For water sports lovers, there are a number of canoe and kayak launching pontoons if you have your own water craft or you can hire a standup paddleboard, canoe or kayak from one of the local waterfront businesses, join a guided tour or sign up for a sailing adventure.

“There’s also a three-day long weekend visitor itinerary to guide you around our tourism treasures.”

Redlands Coast’s thriving food scene offers on-trend bars, micro-breweries and outstanding dining options.

“There’s no doubt you will find something to satisfy everyone’s taste, with the Redlands Coast online food trail directory a great place to start,” Cr Williams said.

“Visitors hoping to reconnect with nature also won’t be disappointed, with plenty of great experiences from guided eco-education tours by Ranger Stacey at Redland City Council’s IndigiScapes Centre, to bayside and hinterland wildlife spotting, and Point Lookout (Mooloomba) boardwalk on Minjerribah from where you can see an incredible array of marine creatures.

“October is also a great time for divers to see the famous annual visitors to Minjerribah’s Manta ray Bommie, while humpback whales continue on their annual migration past Point Lookout (Mulumba) – one of Australia’s best land-based whale-watching destinations.

“Those who prefer more energetic land-based pursuits, Redlands Coast is blessed with some of the region’s best hinterland mountain bike, hiking and horse riding trails, with more than 60km of tracks in the Bayview Conservation Area alone, which is home to koalas, goannas, glossy black-cockatoos, wallabies and powerful owls. There is also almost 240ha of natural conservation bushland at Redlands Track Park, along with the many kilometres of off-road cycling routes across Redlands Coast.”

Redlands Coast offers a range of accommodation options from island waterfront cottages and camping and beachfront resorts on Minjerribah to glamping at Mount Cotton’s (Boolimba) Sirromet Winery and hinterland getaways.

Half a dozen of the best

Redlands Coast’s October long weekend getaway options can be as relaxing or adventurous as you like. Here’s six to get you started.

Enjoy local arts on the Minjerribah arts trail.

  1. Immerse in a Quandamooka experience. Redlands Coast’s traditional heritage and culture is rich indeed and well worth getting to know. Go to quandamookacoast.com.au or YuraTours.com.au for details of guided cultural tours on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). You can also book a Goompi Trail experience with a Quandamooka guide booked through Stradbroke Ferries which explores Dunwich (Goompi) and covers aspects of Aboriginal life such as the fish ring, bush medicines, local food and how artefacts are made. Complete the experience with a visit to Salt Water Murris’ Quandamooka Aboriginal Art Gallery (9am-2pm, Tuesday-Friday, 8.30am-12.30pm weekends); Island Arts Gallery (open every day 9am-2pm); and Delvene Cockatoo-Collins Studio, renowned Quandamooka artist, where you can buy her handmade wares or immerse in Delvene’s personally guided Art Walk and weaving workshop. Talk to the helpful staff at the Redlands Coast Visitor Information Centre, open 7 days from 9am – 4pm, or phone 1300 667 386, about the cultural tours available.

Wales off North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah).

  1. Go land-based whale watching. The humpback whale migration continues in October, so while you are on Straddie, head to picturesque North Gorge Walk at Point Lookout (Mulumba) and see who can spot the first whale (or a heap of other marine creatures). It is rated one of the best land-based whale-watching spots on the Southern Hemisphere.  If you get the taste for it, you can also get fresh seafood straight from the trawler with Rufus King located at Amity Point (Pulan). Travel to and around the island costs about $30 for an adult (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass) and $16 for a child (passenger water taxi return ticket + bus pass). Alternatively, Stradbroke Ferries are running specials on selected dates that allow you to take a car over at a discounted rate, so check their website.

  1. Experience Island time in no time on Coochie. Taking the short 10-minute ferry ride over to Coochiemudlo Island (Goochie Mudlo) from Victoria Point (Warrer Warrer) really is one of the best quick escapes in South-East Queensland. The sheltered beach is a little piece of paradise with plenty of barbecue and picnic spots, or you can hire a pontoon barbecue boat or head off on the island’s awesome coastal walking trails. There’s a cafe nearby with its own art gallery offering homemade meals and refreshments. Adults can travel on the water taxi for $10 return and children for only $5 return.

The Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area is great for bush walking.

  1. Hit the tracks. Warm up with a hike to Mount Cotton (Jungalpin) summit for views out to Moreton and North Stradbroke Islands (it’s particularly beautiful at sunrise or sunset). You can begin at the Eastern Escarpment Conservation Area, Gate 2, West Mt Cotton Road (opposite Schoeck Road), Mount Cotton – suitable for hikers, mountain bike riders and horseriders. If that isn’t enough, why not walk or cycle the Eddie Santagiuliana Way from Cleveland to Thornlands (wheelchair and pram friendly) or take in the wild surrounds of Redlands Track Park, Bayview Conservation Park, Venman’s National Park, Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area or the Southern Moreton Bay islands.

  1. Connect with nature. IndigiScapes Environmental Education Centre and Café, located in Capalaba (Kapallaba) is an awesome place for families to go for a wander to learn about our naturally wonderful environment, dine at the eco café, overlooking the natural bushlands, with meals inspired from spices of the bush. Kids will have a blast at the discovery centre and outdoor adventure trails. You’ll find all the details at indigiscapes.redland.qld. gov.au

Macleay Island

  1. Go island hopping. Bring your Go Card and catch the water taxi from Redland Bay (Talwalpin) and make your way around the Southern Moreton Bay Islands. Karragarra Island is the first stop, just a 15-minute ride from the terminal, and a great spot for a picnic on the foreshore and maybe a visit to the community gardens. Next is Macleay Island (Jencoomercha) where you can enjoy a meal on the deck after a fun game of barefoot bowls with its stunning views. Just a short stroll from the bowls club, you’ll find the Macleay Island Arts Complex, showcasing proud local artists wares (10am-3pm, Tuesday-Sunday; art classes available). It is then on to Lamb Island (Ngudooroo), a 2km x 1km peaceful island where you can enjoy the local fishing spots and unwind in the natural environment. Then another seven-minute ferry ride to Russell Island (Canaipa) where there are conveniently located cafes, the perfect spot to enjoy views over Canaipa Passage out to North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). On the water taxi, inter-island travel is free so you can do the whole trip for $16 return for an adult and $8 return for children ages 5-14 year, 0–4 years travel for free. Or for a shorter island trip, walk to King Island at Wellington Point.

Find out more about Redlands Coast getaways by calling the Visitor Information Centre on 1300 667 386 or by going to visitredlandscoast.com.au

Library staff renew love of reading through Book Week costumes


Redland City Council Library staff will be dressing as their favourite book characters and highlighting the importance of reading during Book Week, from 21-27 August 2021.

Mayor Karen Williams said the annual event run by the Children’s Book Council of Australia was a time for everyone to celebrate books and to highlight amazing Australian authors and illustrators.

“This year’s Book Week theme is ‘Old Worlds, New Worlds, Other Worlds’ and what better way to escape to worlds unknown than through the portal of a book,” she said.

“Reading is for everyone and you don’t need to be an expert.

“It’s also never too early to start reading to your children or engaging them with storytelling.

“You don’t have to limit yourself to printed books either, as our digital libraries have a wonderful trove of resources for you to download, listen to and cherish.

“If you are looking for recommendations you can also ask our library staff for a list of the shortlisted nominations for the Book of the Year Awards and request a copy through our libraries catalogue.

“All you need to unlock new worlds is a library card. Becoming a library member is free and you can sign up either in one of our branches or through the Redland City Council Library app.”

The libraries have organised a special Book Week reading at Redland District Special School on Monday, and staff will dress up for First 5 Forever programs held at Cleveland, Victoria Point and Capalaba Libraries from Tuesday to Thursday and at the Wellington Point Reserve Pop Up Library on Friday.

There are also Book Week-themed digital resources available for children, through Borrowbox and Library apps.

“Library staff are very excited about Book Week and the chance to dress up, and are encouraging children who visit the library to dress up as their favourite characters as well,” Cr Williams said.

For more information on Redland City Council Libraries, including how to join and details on the First 5 Forever programs, visit the library website.

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Community to have its say on draft local plan for Victoria Point


Redlands Coast residents will soon be able to have their say on a structure plan to guide development of an emerging community in Victoria Point.

Mayor Karen Williams said the draft South West Victoria Point Local Plan would progress to community consultation, despite the fact about 40 per cent of the development proposed for the area had already been approved by a State Court.

“The Planning and Environment Court has approved two residential development proposals and one for an over 50s lifestyle village, an outcome which was taken out of our hands,” Cr Williams said.

“Despite this, there are still benefits in continuing to progress the plan to consultation and in continuing to lobby the State Government for the necessary infrastructure to support the development of this new residential community.”

At this week’s General Meeting, Council reaffirmed it would not sign off on the Local Plan until the State Government commits to fund the vital road infrastructure required for the area’s future growth.

“Council’s position in relation to the emerging community has not changed since 2019, when a similar resolution was endorsed,” Cr Williams said.

“Our residents have told us they do not want development without the infrastructure to support the growth and our stance shows Council is listening to these concerns.

“We have previously asked the State to commit to deliver the dual carriage way of Cleveland-Redland Bay Road between Magnolia Parade, Victoria Point and Giles Road, Redland Bay.

“We acknowledge the State’s commitment of $110 million to duplicate part of this state road, between Magnolia Parade and Anita Street, Redland Bay, but ask them to commit to full duplication before we will agree to adopt the Local Plan as an amendment to City Plan.”

Councillors voted to amend the draft South West Victoria Point Local Plan to address State Ministerial conditions. It will then be sent back to the State Planner for final endorsement after which Council will start public consultation, about September.

“The process for this detailed plan began in 2018 so we are happy we are almost at the stage to take it to the community,” Cr Williams said.

The draft local plan covers about 175 hectares of land located between Bunker Road and Brendan Way in the north, Clay Gully Road and Cleveland-Redland Bay Road in the east, Double Jump Road in the south, and Little Eprapah Creek in the west.

Councillor for Division 4 Lance Hewlett said a well-prepared structure plan should ensure that development is appropriate, coordinated and delivered in a timely manner.

“We want this area to be an attractive, functional and walkable urban community that is supported by an accessible neighbourhood centre, integrated open space, active transport network and public transport services,” Cr Hewlett said.

“The local plan will guide new development through a mix of dwelling types, protecting and enhancing ecological habitat and connections, and outline the infrastructure that will be needed to support the new community.”

Clarity sought on Minjerribah land use


Redland City Council is seeking a commitment from the State Government for comprehensive community consultation on its plan for North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) and to detail how it will accommodate the land-use aspirations of traditional owners.

It follows a ministerial direction for Council to amend its planning scheme to rezone 25 lots of native title land on the island for residential, industrial, community and tourism development.

Mayor Karen Williams said that while Council recognised that the direction had been made to give the Quandamooka people important residential and commercial opportunities, a commitment from the State Government was required to undertake a comprehensive and coordinated community consultation exercise.

“It needs to clearly articulate its strategic plan for Minjerribah and reveal how it intends to accommodate the land-use aspirations of the Quandamooka people and deliver on its economic transition commitments,” Cr Williams said.

“Deputy Premier Steven Miles has directed Council to amend its planning scheme to reflect a Temporary Local Planning Instrument (TLPI) that was made in September last year which overrides City Plan and rezones native title land at Dunwich (Gumpi), Amity (Pulan Pulan) and Point Lookout (Mulumba).

“While this is something the State is directing, Council will work closely with communities on the island and continue to advocate on their behalf to make sure the State considers and understands their expectations for real investment to support the island economy and local jobs.”

“Council also seeks a firm commitment from the State that it will provide adequate funding for all the infrastructure and associated costs for the development of these land parcels.

Councillor for North Stradbroke Island Peter Mitchell said that while it was understood that Council would have a role in assessing and deciding development applications for the 25 lots, some applications for the land might require approval by the Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning’s State Assessment and Referral Agency.

“On behalf of Council, I made a submission to the Minister noting Council’s support for the Quandamooka Peoples’ land aspirations and made a number of suggestions to help facilitate a transparent and collaborative process but we did not get a response,” Cr Mitchell said.

“As we now work to amend City Plan in line with the ministerial direction, it is vital that the clarity that Council has sought is forthcoming. We need to ensure all submissions made during this process can be considered on their merits, so it may be appropriate for the State to take an active role in the public consultation and consider taking responsibility for reviewing and commenting on all submissions received during this period.

Visit Redlands Coast for Brisbane Ekka long weekend


Naturally wonderful Redlands Coast will be welcoming visitors for the rescheduled Brisbane Ekka long weekend in October to tick off some top attractions on their local long-break bucket lists.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council would soon roll out a tourism campaign highlighting the great getaway ideas which were “just up the road yet a world away” on Redlands Coast.

“As Redlands Coast has already had its Ekka public holiday, everything will be open and welcoming visitors and locals for the Brisbane, Moreton Bay and Scenic Rim Ekka long weekend from Friday 29 October,” Cr Williams said.

“COVID is likely to present difficulties for longer-distance travel for some time, so we want to make sure the rest of South-East Queensland realise that just down the road on Redlands Coast there are some inspiring natural attractions from glamping and beach camping, bush retreats and activities to bayside and ocean adventures.”

The tourism campaign is part of a Mayoral Minute outlining Redland City Council’s ongoing financial and other support for pandemic-affected local businesses and community organisations and supported by Councillors at today’s General Meeting.

Cr Williams said local government continued to play a vital role in the COVID response.

“During this pandemic Council has responded immediately to help stop the spread of the virus, keep our communities safe and provide critical services to the residents of Redland City,” she said.

“We have spent millions of dollars and countless hours of effort to support the community, including allocating $1 million for a COVID recovery fund; establishing a targeted grants program for community organisations and sporting clubs; contributing grants funding of nearly $17.5 million awarded through State and Federal stimulus programs; and strengthening our Local Buy policy.

“My Mayoral Minute also noted the critical and changing role of Council in responding to COVID-19 and protecting our community. It also committed Council to continuing to remain agile in maintaining and delivering services and support for our community during this pandemic.”

Cr Williams said Council was working with local tourism operators and businesses to ensure exceptional COVID-safe experiences awaited local residents and visitors.

Straddie Chamber of Commerce president Col Battersby said it was imperative to do everything possible to promote Redlands Coast to visitors.

“Council and the city’s chambers of commerce work closely to promote the city and it pays off for tourism operators each time we embark on a campaign,” he said.

“So, if you are having the Ekka long weekend in October I encourage you to take a break on Redlands Coast, and in particular Straddie, that is on your doorstep. October is a wonderful time to come to Straddie and we look forward to welcoming you.”

Redlands Coast Chamber of Commerce president Rebecca Young said local businesses were working hard to ensure they could attract visitors to the city and congratulated Council for supporting them through the Ekka long weekend tourism campaign.

“Tourism is one of the sectors most affected by lockdowns and any support that can be provided to encourage more people to come and spend here is welcomed.”

Find out more about Redlands Coast getaways by calling the Visitor Information Centre on 1300 667 386 or going to visitredlandscoast.com.au.

Exciting vision for Birkdale Community Precinct


Redland City Council has formally adopted the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document – another step towards creation of an exciting community heart for Redlands Coast.

Mayor Karen Williams said the ideas from the community and presented as a spatial representation in the vision document provided an exciting glimpse at what the 62-hectare site could become.

The vision concept plan.

“This is not the Council’s vision for the site; it is what the community told us they would like to see there,” Cr Williams said.

“To see many of the ideas suggested by the community during our sensationally supported engagement phase actually placed on a map really gives you an impression of how large a scale this vision is and how much can be accommodated on the precinct.

“It shows how the precinct could operate effectively with a multitude of purposes and outcomes and is an exciting glimpse into what our future generations can enjoy.

“It also begins to show the broader picture. Birkdale Community Precinct will have benefits well beyond its boundaries with major public transport upgrades; employment opportunities during its establishment and then ongoing; and as an attractive location for enterprises and ventures across a wide spectrum.”

Cr Williams said the vision placed a range of rural experiences around a restored Willards Farm.

“It could operate in tandem with bush tucker gardens and agritourism opportunities and more,” she said.

“It respects and protects the precinct’s valuable natural habitat while also providing plenty of room for bush walks, wetlands boardwalks, an aquatic centre and adventure play hub, open lawn spaces and eco-camping facilities.

“The vision places the Redland Whitewater Centre – which will be an event venue for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games – in an existing cleared area adjacent to the aquatic centre and with the area possibly having canoe access from Tingalpa Creek. It clearly shows the centre and associated aquatic playground takes up just a small portion of the overall site.

“The heritage-listed former World War II radio receiving station takes pride of place in the centre of a pedestrian spine running through the precinct, offering the possibility of a memorial site as well as World War II artefact displays. This sits next to a First Nations ceremonial space and cultural history centre.”

Cr Williams said the vision showed Birkdale Community Precinct’s potential to be transformed into a world-class precinct that would be a multi-generational showpiece for Redlands Coast.

“It will be a picturesque, vibrant and diverse destination which provides benefits beyond its boundaries in helping to define Redlands Coast,” she said.

“The plan doesn’t represent a completed design that is ready to be built. It is instead an interpretation of what it could look like.

“This document brings together the ideas gathered from the community during an extensive seven-week engagement program and presents them as concepts. It will be used to inform a draft master plan for the precinct for which there will be further extensive community engagement.

“The vision document is structured around the precinct’s significant heritage, cultural and conservation values, all of which will be protected.

“Remember, this was Commonwealth land before Council bought it in December 2019 to save it from being subdivided after the Federal Government had earmarked it for about 400 housing lots.

“To see it on the path to becoming a world-class community asset is such an achievement.”

Cr Williams said this stage in the visioning process had been shaped by a huge and unprecedented response from the Redlands Coast community.

“When the community was invited to help create a shared vision for the site during the engagement program which ran from March to May this year, the response was phenomenal,” she said.

“All of those, literally, thousands of ideas and creative suggestions and discussions and sharing of personal stories, are now coming together to form the heart of this precinct.

“This is a long-term project that delivers on the diverse views our community showed us they had for future use of this unique site.

“The community will continue to have ongoing input into the planning for what is shaping up as potentially one of this city’s finest achievements.”

Precinct Vision highlights:

Adopted by Redland City Council on 18 August, 2021, the Birkdale Community Precinct Vision document is an overarching framework to guide decision making and allow individuals, institutions and businesses to establish a dialogue about the prospective future of the precinct. It brings together the multitude of ideas gathered during the engagement process and presents them spatially on the site as concepts.

Environment and ecology

Whether it’s a bush walk on an Aboriginal art trail or wetlands boardwalk, kayaking along Tingalpa Creek, learning about local wildlife and landscape stewardship on an overnight camping trip, or taking in the scenery from a treetop walk – the precinct could deliver a multitude of sustainable ways for visitors to enjoy and experience the landscape. Key elements include: wetlands walk, bush walks, eco-camping and treetop walk.

Agriculture and rural tradition

The legacy of Willards Farm presents a unique opportunity to create a dynamic cluster of agritourism destinations and community assets that celebrate the region’s rural tradition and history. Key elements include: Willards agrifarm experience, flexible farmer’s market space and paddock-to-plate café and dining.

Heritage and history

Birkdale Community Precinct could incorporate the respectful protection, adaptation and reuse of the area’s significant heritage assets through showcasing local First Nations stories and land management practises and celebrating and reusing Willards Farm and the US Army Corps-built World War II radio receiving station. Key elements include: connection to Country, pioneer past and World War II history

Adventure and recreation

The precinct could offer a dynamic and diverse range of adventurous experiences that cater to all ages and abilities, while also establishing a world-class destination for live sport and events – a truly multidimensional destination with something for everybody, keeping visitors coming back for more. Key elements include: Redland Whitewater Centre, aquatic centre, swimming and water play, adventure play hub and flexible events lawns.

Education and discovery

Engaging learning experiences could be embedded throughout the precinct, with opportunities for local stewardship showcasing everything from Traditional Owner land management techniques and wildlife education, renaturalising processes, as well as innovative agricultural research and technologies. Key elements include: bush tucker garden, ag-tech hub and wildlife and landcare centre.

For more information on Birkdale Community Precinct, go to: yoursay.redland.qld.gov.au/imagine

Macleay Island camp ground trial supported


Redland City Council will consider establishing a free or low-cost basic camping ground on the Macleay Island foreshore.

Councillors today supported a Notice of Motion by Division 5 (Redland Bay and Southern Moreton Bay Islands) Councillor Mark Edwards calling for Council to consider options for a 12-month trial of a camping ground at Coast Road Foreshore adjacent to Sandpiper Beach.

“The goal is to boost tourist numbers to the Southern Moreton Bay Islands by providing a small-scale, free or low-cost camping experience for kayakers, cyclists and boaters,” Cr Edwards said.

“It is anticipated that the camp ground would be a maximum two-night (three-day) stay on the foreshore area with only tent sites available and no power, similar to the camp grounds at Lions Boulevard Park, Russell Island.

“Visitors to the island could kayak over and stay at the camp grounds, with portaloos on site. It is not intended that the camp grounds would be for caravans or motor homes.

“The intention would be for a local community group to run the camping ground on behalf of Council.

“This sandy beach at Coast Road Foreshore on Macleay Island is predominantly Council-owned property and has treed and grassed areas, walking tracks, and picnic settings – an ideal site for a low-key camping area.”

Cr Edwards said he had asked Council to consider how a camping ground might be approved, taking into account planning and local laws, risks and budget considerations.

“I have asked that officers research and prepare an options report for further consideration by 15 December 2021 for the proposed camping ground trial at 79-87 Coast Road, Macleay Island,” he said.

“I have received written support from the Macleay Island Progress Association, local group Running Wild and the Wooden Boat Association of Queensland for this small-scale camping ground, while the Tingira Boat Club has offered to provide portable toilets to Council free-of-charge during the trial.

“Running Wild has offered to help run the camp ground during the trial and Tingira Boat Club has also offered to help manage the trial. The fact a licensed club that offers meals and function space is on board will assist in supporting the trial.”

Redland City seeks funding commitment for island master plan


Redland City Council has renewed its call to the State Government to lock in funding for key projects in North Stradbroke Island’s draft Gumpi (Dunwich) Master Plan (GDMP).

At its general meeting today, Council agreed to make a further submission on the draft plan, urging the State to make a firm commitment to deliver critical services and infrastructure and also consider key projects to be delivered through a future South East Queensland City Deal.

Mayor Karen Williams said that while Council was supportive of the master planning work undertaken so far, it was concerned the draft plan had been released for community consultation without addressing crucial issues raised many times by Council over several years.

“We are also concerned that no budget commitment has been outlined for a plan which will cost well over $100 million. There is no detailed implementation plan and no indication of the costs, delivery timeframes or funding sources despite our repeated requests,” Cr Williams said

“There’s not even an indication of who will be responsible for project delivery – another aspect of the process on which Council has unsuccessfully sought clarity.

“We simply cannot support the draft GDMP until these issues are addressed to ensure Minjerribah gets a plan which guarantees a real economic boost and real jobs for locals.

“Also absent is a commitment to the technical studies and planning needed to ensure the delivery of a sustainable, efficient and integrated barge and ferry terminal – something which is critical to the success of State Government’s economic transition strategy for the island.

“These need to be completed as a matter of urgency to determine whether the concept for the Junner Street terminal is both suitable and can actually be delivered.

“The draft master plan is a product of the State’s economic transition strategy for the island which was designed to lift the local economy, which is why it demands certainty in both funding and implementation.”

Cr Williams said Council would make representations to both the State and Federal governments asking for key projects identified in the Gumpi (Dunwich) Master Plan to be delivered through a future South East Queensland City Deal where appropriate.

“And we will be making representations to the State Government to emphasise Council’s commitment to working in partnership with it and the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation (QYAC) on delivery of the master plan,” Cr Williams said.

“We urge the State to re-establish the Minjerribah Ministerial Forum and invite us along to guide all this through.”

Councillor for North Stradbroke Island Peter Mitchell said the draft plan also needed to offer more clarity over the future of mining lease areas and the sand loading facility.

“A full understanding of what rehabilitation works are needed and alternative uses needs to be sufficiently advanced to ensure we know the extent of any contamination and the potential rehabilitation costs and responsibilities,” Cr Mitchell said.

“There is also no progress on a detailed structure planning of One-Mile despite both QYAC and Council reaffirming just how important this is. The State needs to meet its responsibilities in consulting and engaging directly with QYAC on One-Mile.

“It must commit to the identification and delivery of the critical services and infrastructure requirements required to support the One-Mile community at no cost to Council or the broader Redlands Coast community.”

Cr Williams said cost estimates to deliver five of the projects identified in the GDMP was already in the order of $100 million.

“But we still haven’t been informed what additional costs will be associated with other elements of the draft GDMP,” Cr Williams said.

“What we do know is that significant further investigations and planning work is required to more accurately understand potential delivery costs, as well as the on-going costs of management and maintenance and the critical infrastructure upgrades required to make the Junner Street ferry terminal an all-weather facility.

“For the GDMP projects to be delivered, it will almost certainly require substantial government funding commitments which we have yet to see.

“Without them, what confidence can the island community have that the key initiatives outlined in the draft plan will be delivered to support the island’s transition from mining to a tourism-based economy.”

Applications open for Redland City Council Sponsorship Program


Applications are now open for Round 1 of Redland City Council’s annual Sponsorship Program.

Mayor Karen Williams said almost $140,000 was available over two rounds of sponsorship this financial year to support community-based events and initiatives held on Redlands Coast.

“Council sponsorship helps local organisations, community groups and individuals run a diverse range of events, projects and initiatives that directly benefit our community,” she said.

“From food and wine festivals and vintage markets to fireworks displays, fun runs and fishing competitions, we know that events provide immense economic benefits for Redlands Coast and attract visitors from far and wide.

“Council is thrilled to have the opportunity to support our event organisers in delivering some much-needed light relief to our hard-working community while supporting our local economy.

“Sponsorship can take the form of either financial or in-kind support, and the first round of the program is available for activities planned for December 2021 through to November 2022.

“I would encourage all event and activity organisers to consider applying for this support.”

Since 2016, Council has awarded more than $920,922 in Sponsorship and more than $1,844,587 in Community Grant funding. This includes about $259,000 to support local businesses impacted by COVID-19 in 2019-20.

Applications for Round 1 of this year’s Sponsorship Program will be accepted until 13 September 2021 and will support activities and events that provide tangible and measurable benefits to the Redlands community.

There are categories for minor sponsorship (up to $15,000) and major sponsorship (more than $15,000).

Funding opportunities are also available in the first round of the 2021-2022 Community Grants Program which closes on 23 August, with grants up to $10,000 to support local community organisations and individuals to undertake projects for the benefit of the Redlands Coast community.

Applications for Capital Infrastructure Grants of up to $50,000 will open in September, and a second round of both Sponsorship and Community Grants will open in February 2022.

For eligibility criteria and to learn more about how to apply for grants or sponsorship, visit Redland City Council’s website or call 3829 8999.