Council devices keep rubbish from waterways


Redlands Coast residents are being asked to think about how they dispose of their rubbish after a newly-installed trash rack captured 8.5 tonnes of waste from local stormwater in just two weeks.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the newly-installed trash rack was part of Council’s network of 587 stormwater protection devices that helped prevent waste ending up in Moreton Bay.

“Last year Council removed about 280 cubic metres of litter, vegetation and other material from our network of stormwater protection devices – that’s enough to fill more than four average-size backyard swimming pools,” Cr Williams said.

“Anything from trees and logs through to toys, balls and takeaway cups are collected in these devices, and without them this material would have ended up in our local creeks and Moreton Bay.

“With a wet summer expected, there is likely to be increased stormwater runoff into our local catchments, so we are urging residents to think about where you throw your rubbish to ensure it doesn’t end up in our creeks.”

Division 10 Councillor Paul Bishop said the Birkdale trash rack was installed on Agnes Street, alongside a public park, following concerns about localised flooding and pollutants entering Woodgate Canal.

“Two weeks after it was installed, Council officers inspected the trash rack as part of storm preparedness and noted it was already half full,” Cr Bishop said.

“Further heavy rain filled it further, resulting in it being emptied three months ahead of schedule.

“The trash rack will help reduce road flooding by preventing rubbish from blocking the drain.

“Council officers have advised that no animals have ever been caught in council rubbish traps or gross pollutant devices.”

Redland City Council uses a range of Stormwater Quality Improvement Devices, including bioretention basins, bio-swales, grass swales, vegetated swales, detention basins, sedimentation basins, constructed wetlands, inground and open gross pollutant traps (GPTs), trash racks, litter baskets and sediment traps.