Community asked to be vigilant against further spread of fire ants


Redland City Council is backing the State in calling for community vigilance against the spread of Fire Ants after another Redland suburb was added to the State’s high risk fire ant restricted areas.

The State Government last week announced that Sheldon has now been added to the existing high risk Redland suburbs of Mount Cotton and Redland Bay.

Division 6 Councillor Julie Talty said the imported South American ants present a serious social, economic and environmental threat.

“I am disappointed to learn that another suburb in my Divisions is now on the restricted area list.

“While the State Government is responsible for the program to halt the spread of imported Red Fire Ants these efforts must be backed up by the vigilance of all Redland residents and businesses,” Cr Talty said.

“Reports of any suspected Fire Ants should be made directly to Biosecurity Queensland (DAFF) on 13 25 23.

Councillor Lance Hewlett, Council’s Portfolio Chair for Community Services, Environment and Regulation said Biosecurity Queensland in the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) has a large program in place aimed at trying to detect, identify and eradicate these serious pests.

“While Council has little involvement in these controls measures, it is still subject to the movement restrictions that all people and commercial enterprises in infected areas must comply with.

“These controls are designed to reduce the spread of the pest by restricting the movement of materials such as soil and gravel from inside a restricted area (red or orange zone) to outside a restricted area.

“Residents in infected areas should take the opportunity to visit the State Government’s website to familiarise themselves with this serious pest and the control measures in place.

“The impact on commercial businesses and residents are generally in the form of these movement controls and risk management planning for commercial operators.”
The list of restricted items under the Plant Protection Act 1989 and the Plant Protection Regulation 2002 includes soil (includes fill, clay, overburden, scrapings, topsoil, decomposed granite (deco), potting media and any other material from the ground), mulch, manure, bark, hay, pot plants, potting media, turf, sleepers and logs, gravel and poultry litter.