Monthly Archives: July 2013

Tickets for 2013 Moreton Bay & Islands Tourism Awards on sale


Tickets are now on sale for the 2013 Moreton Bay and Islands Tourism Awards’ gala dinner on July 18 at the Redland Performing Arts Centre (RPAC).

This year’s winners will be named across 15 categories – from ecotourism and festival and events, to adventure tourism, deluxe accommodation and excellence in food tourism.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said the annual awards were invaluable in supporting and strengthening tourism, particularly in the Redlands.

“The awards showcase the local tourism industry, celebrate sustainable business procedures and excellence in customer service and innovation, and encourage environmental awareness and risk management practices,” Cr Williams said.

Straddie

“Tourism plays a key role in the Moreton Bay and Islands regional economy by attracting visitors, jobs and growth, and it is one of our priority sectors here in the Redlands.’’

“It is appropriate this year’s event is being hosted in the Redlands, where Priority Development Areas have been declared for the Toondah Harbour and Weinam Creek precincts in a major boost for local tourism.

“The awards attracted 23 submissions from 19 businesses across 15 categories – with 13 of the submissions from 10 Redlands operators, from the mainland, North Stradbroke Island and Southern Moreton Bay Islands.”

A joint project of Redland City Council, Brisbane City Council and Moreton Bay Regional Council, they are open to tourism operators in Redland City, Brisbane’s bayside suburbs and the Moreton Bay region.

Redland City Council Tourism portfolio spokesman Cr Craig Ogilvie congratulated all entrants for their commitment.

“These award submissions are incredibly detailed and contain a great deal of information about how each business delivers its services and experiences,” Cr Ogilvie said.

“The willingness of businesses to put in that effort shows a strong commitment to excellence and to our tourism industry.’’

Last year three successful Redlands business – Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, Big Red Cat – Sea Stradbroke and Straddie Kingfisher Tours – were inducted into the Hall of Fame having won their categories for three consecutive years. They now cannot enter the same categories but can nominate in new ones.

The award categories are: Tourist Attractions; Festivals and Events; Ecotourism; Heritage, Cultural and Indigenous Tourism; Specialised Tourism and/or Business Services; Tour and Transport Operators; Adventure Tourism; Tourism Restaurants and Catering Services; Standard Accommodation; Deluxe Accommodation; Hosted Accommodation; New Tourism Development; Excellence in Sustainable Tourism; Outstanding Contribution by a  Volunteer or Volunteer group; and Excellence in Food Tourism.

RPAC will host the event on its expansive Concert Hall stage – the first time in its six-year history the RPAC stage has been used in this way.

Tickets are now on sale through RPAC Ticketing, on 3829 8131, boxoffice@rpac.com.au or online at www.rpac.com.au.

Redlands wildlife on show


The Redlands’ reputation as a haven for wildlife is set to go international with a Japanese documentary team filming in the city.

Japanese director Shotaro Tsuji was in the Redlands at the weekend to document local wildlife conservation and rescue operations.

The film, Mystery Australia, will be shown on Japanese television later this year.

koala

It visits the Redlands property of Koala Action Group member Jenny Anthony, home to koalas and kangaroos and part of two Redland City Council habitat protection programs – Land for Wildlife and a Voluntary Conservation Agreement.

The documentary will also highlight the dedicated efforts of the Redlands’ after-hours Wildlife Ambulance service, with a crew accompanying its nightshift volunteers on a rescue.

Japanese production company CP International said it selected the Redlands for the documentary because of its koala conservation efforts.

Redland City Council spokesman for the environment Councillor Paul Gleeson said this was recognition of the Redlands progressive attitude towards wildlife conservation, particularly in looking after its koala population.

“Council took over the operation of the after-hours Wildlife Ambulance in 1998 and our
officers co-ordinate this service,’’ Cr Gleeson said.

“But it relies on the hard work and dedication of the caring volunteers who work through the night to save injured and distressed wildlife. These volunteers are extremely passionate and dedicated, with many of them also having full-time jobs.’’

Cr Gleeson said Redland City Council was committed to programs to encourage and assist residents to enhance habitat for koalas and other wildlife.

“The most important of these is the Koala Conservation Agreement Program, which is a partnership between landholders and the council to plant, manage and maintain koala trees on their property,’’ Cr Gleeson said.

“Our Parks and Conservation officers are responsible for restoring and maintaining habitat in the city’s parks and conservation areas, as well as identifying and planting corridors to provide movement and connectivity.

“For all this to draw the attention of international documentary makers is very satisfying.’’

Rates notices on their way


The majority of Redland City residents will be in for a pleasant surprise when rates notices arrive in the mail from next week.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said Council’s 2013-14 Budget, adopted on 27 June, would result in only a modest rates increase across most rating categories.

“Redland City Council’s 2013-14 Budget included a headline rates increase of only 1.43 per cent – the lowest in South East Queensland, for the second year running” she said.

“For an average owner-occupied property valued at $282,000, using an average amount of water, this equates to a rates rise of just 1.1 per cent.

“Council has achieved this very modest rates and charges increase for average Redlanders despite absorbing millions of dollars in external costs imposed on Council by other levels of government, such as the Federal Government’s carbon tax and State Government approved electricity price hikes (up 22%) and bulk water charges (up 16.7%).

“Without these external factors, we could have seen a rates freeze – or even better – for many Redland City residents.

Cr Williams said the 2013-14 Budget had also included rate reform, reducing the number of rating categories from 45 to 22.

“This will mean some residents may see a change to the rating category on their rate notice,” she said.

“While this will be a positive change for the majority of residents, there will also be a small number of residents who will see an increase in their rates as a result of the changes.

“The changes to rating categories will reinstate separate canal levies for residents at Raby Bay, Sovereign Waters and Aquatic Paradise, splitting this cost from their general rate to ensure transparency.

“The residents who live in these areas told us they wanted separate canal levies. We have delivered, providing greater transparency in how the funds are raised and how they are spent on the canals and the lake.”

Cr Williams said there were a range of options to assist people to pay rates and manage their budgets.

“This includes direct debit, which carries no additional fees, providing a simple, safe and effective way to avoid unnecessary penalties,” she said.

“Payment frequencies can be tailored to suit individual circumstances – in full, weekly, fortnightly, monthly – and payments can be made in advance.”

Other payment options include BPAY, Interactive voice recognition (IVR) and online through the MyServices portal.

Rate notices are issued quarterly, in July, October, January and April. There is an 11 per cent interest charge – set by State legislation – on overdue rates, calculated daily.

Below are examples of rate notices for the average Redlands rating categories.

Below represents an average residential owner occupied home using an average 200kl of water per annum, which will see a 1.1% increase in general rates on average.

Average Residential Owner Occupied property valued at $282,000

2012/13
$

2013/14
proposed 1a $

$
Variance

%
Variance

General Rate

$1125.26

$1185.51

$60.25

5.4%

Environment Levy

$99.80

$65.00

-$34.80

-34.9%

Landfill Remediation Charge

$50.00

$60.00

$10.00

20.0%

 Sub-total

 $1275.06

 $1310.51  $35.45

 2.8%

Utility charges
Waste 240lt

$318.50

$325.00

$6.50

2.0%

Water Access

$252.25

$257.55

$5.30

2.1%

Water Consumption (200kl)

$455.70

$539.54

$83.84

18.4%

Sewerage

$730.41

$633.75

-$96.66

-13.2%

Sub-total $1756.86 $1755.84 -$1.02 -0.1%

Total

$3031.92

$3066.35

$34.43

1.1%

 

Below represents an average residential owner occupied Southern Moreton Bay Island property, which will see a 0.9% increase in general rates on average.

SMBI Residential Owner Occupied – Rating Category 3a|3b

2012/13
$

2013/14
$

$
Variance

%
Variance

Valuation (Average)

$52,000

$52,000

$0.00

0.0%

Rate in the Dollar

0.01813781

0.01751090

-0.00062691

-3.5%

General Rate

$943.17

$910.57

-$32.60

-3.5%

Environment Levy

$99.80

$65.00

-$34.80

-34.9%

Landfill Remediation Charge

$50.00

$60.00

$10.00

20.0%

Rural Fire Levy (Macleay Is)

$10.00

$10.00

$0.00

0.0%

SMBI TransLink Operations Charge

$0.00

$85.46

$85.46

100.0%

Sub-Total

$1,102.97

$1,131.03

$28.06

2.5%

Utility Charges
Waste 240lt

$318.50

$325.00

$6.50

2.0%

Water Access

$252.25

$257.55

$5.30

2.1%

Water Consumption (200kl – average)

$455.70

$539.54

$83.84

18.4%

Sewerage

$730.41

$633.75

-$96.66

-13.2%

Sub-Total

$1,756.86

$1,755.84

-$1.02

-0.1%

Total

$2,859.83

$2,886.87

$27.04

0.9%

 

Below represents an average mainland commercial property, which will see a 0.7% increase in general rates on average.

Commercial Mainland – Rating Category 6

2012/13
$

2013/14
$

$
Variance

%
Variance

Valuation (Average)

$765,000

$762,000

-$3,000

-0.4%

Rate in the Dollar

0.00423900

0.00433718

0.00009818

2.3%

General Rate

$3,242.84

$3,304.93

$62.10

1.9%

Environment Levy

$99.80

$65.00

-$34.80

-34.9%

Landfill Remediation Charge

$50.00

$60.00

$10.00

20.0%

Sub-Total

$3,392.64

$3,429.93

$37.30

1.1%

Utility Charges
Waste 240lt

$318.50

$325.00

$6.50

2.0%

Water Access

$252.25

$257.55

$5.30

2.1%

Water Consumption (200kl – average)

$455.70

$539.54

$83.84

18.4%

Sewerage

$730.41

$633.75

-$96.66

-13.2%

Sub-Total

$1,756.86

$1,755.84

-$1.02

-0.1%

Total

$5,149.50

$5,185.77

$36.28

0.7%

 

Below represents an average Raby Bay residential owner occupied property, which will see a 3.6% increase in general rates on average.

 

Raby Bay Residential Owner Occupied – Rating Category 1a|1b

2012/13
$

2013/14
$

$
Variance

%
Variance

Valuation (Average)

$860,000

$860,000

$0

0.0%

Rate in the Dollar

0.00359689

0.00336300

-0.00023389

-6.5%

General Rate

$3,093.33

$2,892.18

-$201.15

-6.5%

Environment Levy

$99.80

$65.00

-$34.80

-34.9%

Landfill Remediation Charge

$50.00

$60.00

$10.00

20.0%

Raby Bay Special Charge (Std Lot)

$1,440.35

$1,901.26

$460.91

32.0%

Sub-Total

$4,683.48

$4,918.44

$234.96

5.0%

Utility Charges
Waste 240lt

$318.50

$325.00

$6.50

2.0%

Water Access

$252.25

$257.55

$5.30

2.1%

Water Consumption (200kl – average)

$455.70

$539.54

$83.84

18.4%

Sewerage

$730.41

$633.75

-$96.66

-13.2%

Sub-Total

$1,756.86

$1,755.84

-$1.02

-0.1%

Total

$6,440.34

$6,674.28

$233.94

3.6%

 

 

 

Christmas in July at Redlands IndigiScapes


A festive feel will take over the Redlands IndigiScapes Centre next week with Christmas in July offering residents a night of yuletide cheer.

Traditional Christmas fare will accompany a delicious Indigi-style treat at this community dinner.

The evening will also feature carols by a live performer.

Don’t forget to bring along your wrapped gift (to the value of $5) for a Secret Santa game.

What: Christmas in July Community Dinner

When: Friday 19 July, 7pm

Where: Redlands IndigiScapes Centre, 17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba

Cost: $35 per person and BYO alcohol

Booking are essential and close 17 July. Payment is required at the time of booking.

For more information, phone IndigiScapes on 3824 8611.

Our Redlands – hot off the press


Redland City Council has today launched Our Redlands magazine – a 32-page tool for raising awareness of Council decisions, programs and activities as well as highlighting some of the city’s enviable places and inspirational people. Our Redlands is also available online.

The magazine, which replaces the Residents’ Report flyer, contains more comprehensive information than its predecessor and is presented in a crisper, cleaner and more contemporary format. It also saves ratepayers about $60,000 a year and is less than half the cost of sending a letter to Redlands’ households.

Mayor Karen Williams said this, of course, is in line with Council’s philosophy of delivering better value and customer service at every level of the organisation.

“While we have achieved much in this regard – our organisational restructure alone saves just shy of $2 million a year – it is still a journey as we set about ticking the boxes in terms of efficiency, reducing red tape, improving service delivery to our priority customers, and making it easier to do business with Council,” she said.

Our Redlands magazine will be delivered to island residents through a letter box drop and also placed in stands throughout the City.

Cr Williams said Redlanders could take pride in the fact the City was entering an exciting new era.
“The declaration of both Toondah Harbour and Weinam Creek as Priority Development Areas by the State Government paves the way for their development as key transport hubs and we will be consulting with all stakeholders during the next 12 months,” she said.

“Add to this the Cleveland CBD incentive scheme to revitalise the City’s civic heart and the shopping precincts at Capalaba and Victoria Point, as well as the identified residential estates now in the preliminary planning stages.”

Cr Williams said Redland City remained the best place to live, play and do business.

“I urge all Redlanders to develop an even greater sense of pride in our great City and work together to sell our great City as a preferred destination for both business and pleasure,” she said.

“While we may be small in comparison to our neighbouring local government areas, we should proudly be ‘little but loud’.

“We have a great deal of which we can be proud – our unique islands and enviable lifestyle, our proximity to Australia’s third largest city and its key transport links, the affordable cost of housing, low unemployment, our commitment to sustainable development and, of course, our fantastic sense of community.

“Let us all get out and help put our Redland City on the map.”

Community grants program – round 1 open


Round 1 of Redland City Council’s 2013/14 Community Grants Program opened on Monday 8 July 2013, and will run until 16 August 2013.

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams encouraged community groups and individuals to apply, saying almost $800,000 was distributed from Community Grants ($637,000) and Councillors’ Small Grants ($159,000) programs last financial year.

“The Community Grants Program allows us to tap into the ideas, knowledge, skills and commitment of Redlands’ residents and groups, and support the work they do in our community”, Cr Williams said.

“Past successful applications have helped junior sporting clubs with strategic plans, enhanced wildlife habitats, assisted with rebuilding community clubs and supported cultural exhibitions.

“Think big – if you’re helping our community we may be able to help you achieve your goals.

“I encourage anyone doing a worthwhile not-for-profit activity in Redlands to look at the selection criteria and apply if you are eligible.

“Council also offers free workshops to help people develop an application – we want people to succeed and are committed to getting the best outcomes for our community.”

Submissions for funding are invited for the Organisation Support, Project Support, Conservation, Capital Infrastructure and Regional Arts Development Fund categories. The separate Councillors’ Small Grants program takes submissions all year.

Free “Tools for a Successful Grant Application” workshops will run from 10 – 18 July 2013.

Bookings are essential and eligible individuals and organisations who wish to apply for funding in Round 1 2013-14 are encouraged to attend.

To book your spot at a workshop, call 3829 8911.

Program guidelines and application forms are available online at www.redland.qld.gov.au/CommunitySupport/Grants or by phoning the Council’s grants team on 3829 8911.

 

Second anniversary of Quandamooka land rights agreement


Yesterday marked the second anniversary of a historic native title agreement acknowledging the Quandamooka People as the Traditional Owners of North Stradbroke Island, Peel Island, Goat Island, Bird Island, Stingaree Island, Crab Island and the surrounding waters of Moreton Bay.

On 4 July 2011, Redland City Council also signed an Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) with the Quandamooka People.
Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said it was important to celebrate the anniversary, as it served as a reminder of how far reconciliation efforts had come, and the goals ahead to be achieved in partnership with the Quandamooka People.

“The fourth of July will now always be a day of significance for the Quandamooka People, who not only celebrate the signing of the ILUA with Redland City Council but also the anniversary of the Federal Court officially acknowledging native title, which was the first agreement of its type in south eastern Queensland,” Cr Williams said.

“The anniversary is also an opportunity for us to reflect on how our partnership has strengthened and grown over the past two years.

“We have been proud to work with the Quandamooka people on many exciting community initiatives, including the inaugural Quandamooka Elders forum in February 2013, the transfer of the island’s camping grounds management to ‘Straddie Camping’ and many cultural opportunities such as Reconciliation Day celebrations.

“Redland City Council is dedicated to ensuring we have a continued relationship with our Traditional Owners based on mutual respect and partnership, and a shared commitment to forge a strong and vibrant future for our region.
“Council will continue to strengthen its ties with Traditional Owners, support their role as custodians of their traditional lands and help to educate our community on the living indigenous cultural heritage of the Quandamooka people.”

The anniversary was celebrated with a community gathering of Quandamooka Elders and family members, who shared their rich culture and history with people on North Stradbroke Island.

Speech makers paid homage to the Aboriginal leaders and Elders for their fierce determination in successfully bringing about the consent determination for Quandamooka People two years ago.

Division 2 Councillor Craig Ogilvie said the event paid tribute to those who continued to pursue the native title claim over so many years.

“It was moving to see Aboriginal leaders and Elders being recognised, with an amazing photographic display capturing the original 4 July event and celebrations,” Cr Ogilvie said.
Yesterday’s celebrations included a water blessing and sand blessing and ended with a cultural demonstration of artefacts from the Quandamooka region.

Council telecommunications issue resolved


Redland City Council experienced technical difficulties with its phone system in the Cleveland area yesterday (Thursday 4 July). The phone system is now operational.

Council is working with Telstra to identify the cause of the disruption and to help minimise the likelihood of any future disruptions.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this outage.

communications

Telephone system outage: Thursday 4 July 3.45pm


Redland City Council has been experiencing technical difficulties with its phone system this afternoon.

Council has switched over to its after-hours answering service where you will be able to leave your contacts details and a message.

We apologise for any inconvenience and will get back to you as soon as we can.

communications

2013–14 Budget – clarification


Council would like to clarify the Page 5 article in the Bayside Bulletin on Tuesday 2 July 2013, relating to Redland City Council’s 2013-14 Budget.

Some information under the heading “What’s gone up” is incorrect. All fees, charges, levies and rates have not increased 1.43 per cent, as per the article.

The headline rate i.e. the rates revenue, including utilities charges, increased 1.43 per cent – the lowest such increase of comparable councils in South East Queensland. The average owner-occupier mainland residential ratepayer will pay an average 1.1 per cent more in rates and utility charges – again a far smaller rise than other councils.

rab-bay-sunset

Council is absorbing several millions of dollars in costs imposed by other levels of government (carbon tax, bulk water and electricity charges) rather than passing these on to ratepayers in the form of higher rates.

Council will also deliver – for the first time in many years – a small surplus.

The article also incorrectly reports the TransLink levy for the Southern Moreton Bay Islands has gone up $34.80.

A special charge of $85.46 is being imposed for the first time, to raise revenue for the contribution demanded by the State Government. The impact of the special charge will be offset by a similar reduction in the accelerated infrastructure component of island residents’ rates.

Council is very aware of the cost of living pressures on residents. It struck the 2013-14 Budget to provide where possible cost of living cost relief.

The article does correctly report that Council has reduced quite dramatically its utilities charges, by $96.

Council has also reduced the environment levy by $34.80 to further reduce the impost on ratepayers.