Help save the glossy black-cockatoo


Redland IndigiScapes Centre has glossy black-cockatoo conservation events happening in the next two months and we’re putting the call out for volunteers.

These stunning birds are unfortunately one of the more threatened species of cockatoo in Australia, and listed as vulnerable in Queensland.

It’s easy to help, just sign-up for the glossy black-cockatoo annual survey or the food and habitat tree planting.

Tree planting: More than 700 trees need to be planted on Sunday 21 September 2014 from 9.30am – 11.30am at Karrawarra Park, Macleay Island. IndigiScapes supplies the equipment; you just need to bring your own sun-smart clothes, water and enclosed shoes

Anyone commuting to this event from the mainland can catch the 9am ferry departing from Weinam Creek Marina, Banana Street, Redland Bay.  Please register with IndigiScapes on 3824 8611 to arrange transfers from the Macleay Island ferry terminal to the planting site.

Glossy black-cockatoo survey: Council will be conducting the annual glossy black-cockatoosurvey on Sunday 19October 2014. To join the glossy black-cockatoo survey, residents are asked to attend a volunteer workshop in September or October to hone their skills and be allocated a survey area before the survey day. Registration dates and details are available on the IndigiScapes website.

For more information or to register for workshops and events, visit IndigiScapes website or call 3824 8611.

One thought on “Help save the glossy black-cockatoo

  1. Lindsay Hackett

    I applaud Council for continuing the good work in surveying the Glossy Black Cockatoo.
    We already know much about where this Cockatoo lives and its lifestyle.
    What we seem to be missing is effective action by Council to actually protect this bird and, most importantly, its habitat.
    Much of the important habitat is on bush blocks that are privately owned. Will Council purchase these blocks en masse to provide sanctuaries for this bird in the areas it has chosen for many reasons, or act as usual to permit development to destroy habitat and the species that depend upon it?
    Planting trees in Karrawarra Park on Macleay Island for the Glossy Black sounds fine, but where is the scientific evidence that this bird will relocate to that area after Council has allowed the wholesale destruction of its preferred habitat.
    And this ignores the feral and domestic cat problem that Council generally fails to act upon notwithstanding its Local laws.

    Reply

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